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Results tagged with Search options user 87

Use this tag for questions about the meaning and usage of a particular phrase, for which a dictionary cannot answer.

2
votes
No, this is not a common construction in English. If it were used, I think many or most people would understand it with the sense you expect, but English does not express a positive relation with a …
answered Mar 1 '16 by Hellion
7
votes
It is a metaphor for how well the community members interact amongst themselves. If you consider all the individual members as threads, the "social fabric" is made by having those members interact, t …
answered Jun 13 '14 by Hellion
7
votes
"It's not just that (X)" is another way to say "(X) is not the full extent of the problem." In this construction, the target (X) can be almost any assertion, including a negative assertion. Generall …
answered Aug 17 '16 by Hellion
2
votes
The initial noun, trade, is acting as an attributive noun, modifying the following noun to narrow its focus. Based on the definitions that you looked up, then, you can deduce that a "Trade Behemoth" …
answered Aug 12 '13 by Hellion
37
votes
This is a classic example of "morbid humor". "Set fire to X" means "cause X to start burning". So, if you set fire to a man, you are burning him, and he will most likely die in very short order. …
answered Dec 19 '13 by Hellion
4
votes
That is a variation of an idiom, namely "to have (x) thrust upon you"; which means to suddenly, unexpectedly, and unavoidably receive something that you really didn't want. (Note that the past tense …
answered Jun 11 '14 by Hellion
7
votes
When you "raise a point", you are bringing up an issue to be discussed. After someone has raised a point, you can refer to it as "the point [that has been] raised." One possible sense of take is con …
answered Dec 19 '13 by Hellion
3
votes
To expand on the answer given by Ankit: of late = recently had fallen on evil days = had been having problems, or difficulties. I would not consider it an idiom myself, but perhaps it was a more co …
answered Oct 30 '13 by Hellion
5
votes
It's a food: Ribs (probably pork spare ribs, a popular cut of meat). These ribs have been artificially grown in a tank instead of being produced the normal way (taken from a pig raised on a farm), a …
answered Jun 7 '16 by Hellion
1
vote
The structure is a fairly standard simile; stripped down a bit, it says that Murray emerged "as the ... Nadal to [Djokovic's] Federer", which is to say that the match-up between Murray and Djokovic fe …
answered Sep 12 '13 by Hellion
12
votes
In this case, since EAMES already works for COBB, I think the meaning is more along the lines of definition 5 or 5.1 at oxford dictionary.com's ON definition (thanks to MaulikV for the link): (Of …
answered May 7 '14 by Hellion
2
votes
It's definitely not a threat. :-) It is simply a way of expressing an alternative. In this case, we need to give the alternatives because some condiments are best used by themselves, some work bes …
answered Aug 8 '14 by Hellion
2
votes
I think StoneyB has the right sense of it, but the wrong application: It's not that she committed a criminal act, but that she refused to participate in some criminal scheme, and thus is suffering a …
answered Dec 18 '13 by Hellion
4
votes
It is ambiguous; the card could have been folded once, unfolded, and then refolded along the same crease. Or it could have been folded once into (approximately) halves and then a second time, while f …
answered May 2 '14 by Hellion
1
vote
This is a load of inflated language, expressing a few simple concepts with many complicated words and phrases. Maintain tangible quality: You like to keep things working well and looking good. Th …
answered Feb 26 '14 by Hellion

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