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Results tagged with Search options questions only user 88627

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

3
votes
2answers
My mom wants to stop at a restaurant. But we had already passed it. So my dad says: We're already a mile ahead of the restaurant. Is the use of "ahead of the restaurant" natural?
asked Feb 6 by It's about English
2
votes
3answers
Someone replied to a question I asked( on a website). He wrote: Ajjdj skidid sksksko...... So I said: Sorry but I don't talk gibberish. Is the use of "talk gibberish" natural? Can it be: …
asked Mar 12 by It's about English
0
votes
1answer
Four friends are running.(for fun.) So one of them asks: Where's C? So others reply: We left him behind. But he'll soon catch up with us. Is the use of 'leave behind" natural? B couldn't keep u …
asked Mar 24 by It's about English
2
votes
1answer
If someone thinks I'm faking my identity, trying to be someone I'm not, and claiming me to be "A" can I use: He suspects me as A. Is the use of "suspect as" natural?
asked Jan 29 by It's about English
0
votes
2answers
If a remote control has no batteries in it,is it natural to say: I have to put the batteries in the remote control. (Or should it be : I have to insert the batteries in) And if we remove the bat …
asked Mar 25 by It's about English
0
votes
1answer
Is it natural to say: Why don't you just turn your collar up? Does it sound as natural as "Why don't you just "pop your collar"? And what about "turn down" instead of "fix": Like: Turn your …
asked Mar 18 by It's about English
1
vote
3answers
A person offers a bit food to his friend. So his friend says: Sorry I can't have it. Because if I do,you won't have much left.(/you won't have enough left). So what sounds natural? Option 1 or o …
asked Mar 6 by It's about English
1
vote
1answer
Is "shake a cloth out" used in AmE? Like: He shook out his clothes. He shook out the rug.
asked Feb 21 by It's about English
1
vote
4answers
I text my friend: Hey,you still on for lunch? Instead of this, can I use: Hey,you still up for lunch? Are "on" and "up" interchangeable in this context?
asked Mar 22 by It's about English
0
votes
1answer
A girl was looking for her notebook. Someone had stolen it. So the teacher was searching everyone's bags. So the notebook was found in a girl's notebook. She replied: I don't know how her note …
asked Jun 18 by It's about English
0
votes
2answers
Does "check" sound natural and is its use natural instead of "go through/search": He has checked my phone. He has checked my wallet. Someone has checked my bag. Someone has check …
asked Jun 18 by It's about English
0
votes
2answers
Someone had lost something on his way home. So his friend found it and brought it back, what will be a natural way to express that: I found it on the way. I found it on a road. And does the …
asked Jun 18 by It's about English
0
votes
2answers
I had turned on the AC and the room had cooled down after a while. Later on my brother opened up the door, so I wanted him to close the door. I know I can simply say "Close the door", but I want t …
asked Jun 21 by It's about English
0
votes
1answer
What will be a natural way to increase the length of "last one to. "? Two people are racing to the camping site in their cars. So one of them says: Last one to the camping site has to do the co …
asked Jun 25 by It's about English
-1
votes
1answer
A story is taking place in the present but then it is like "5 years later" or "5 years ago", what will be a natural way to express that: 5 years ahead: The story has gone a few years ahead. (Or …
asked Jun 10 by It's about English

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