Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 89137

is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

3
votes
People do, informally, use crazy glue as a verb. He crazy glued a hat onto his head. This is easy, as glue is a verb as well as a noun anyway. It's just putting the full product name instead of …
answered Mar 25 by SamBC
1
vote
It sounds formal enough to me that it doesn't seem entirely natural. Speaking from the point of view of British English. You should have unsent it, rather than tell me you could've unsent it. Th …
answered Feb 16 by SamBC
1
vote
I don't think there's any universally-agreed-upon way to say that aloud. It would depend on the audience and the circumstance - does the audience know what purchasing power parity is? Do they recognis …
answered Mar 6 by SamBC
2
votes
There are several options. As long as we're talking about opinions, you could use: What does everyone else think? If you don't want everyone to answer, just to see if anyone else has a different …
answered Mar 25 by SamBC
2
votes
The example is a little silly, because people are unlikely to vote in that situation. Elect, in that sort of context, suggests that they were chosen through a vote. However, the general point of elec …
answered Apr 4 by SamBC
1
vote
Plenty of good, natural English isn't idiomatic. The problem here is actually that "was created" implies deliberate creation, though. Also, "the location" is redundant, it is implied by 'where'. You c …
answered Feb 6 by SamBC
1
vote
Halfway through (your life) That's probably the most general sort of phrase for it that I would use, though there are many different options available.
answered Apr 12 by SamBC
2
votes
In this case, in the dialects I'm familiar with, in is more natural and idiomatic than inside. Now, the why is a gut feeling rather than anything I know about from theory. There's a natural tendency …
answered Feb 23 by SamBC
2
votes
I would say, in my experience as a native British English speaker, that "if needed" would be the most usual, and "if necessary" slightly stronger or more formal. "If it's needed" would actually be qui …
answered Feb 13 by SamBC
0
votes
These three use way in different senses, including idiom or set phrase constructions. In all cases, it descends from the basis of way meaning path or route, and you will find 'way' used as part of str …
answered Feb 17 by SamBC
1
vote
I don't consider that grammatical, but replacing you with to is only one option. It could also be replaced with you will. In other contexts, too, "possible you" can be fine. "It is possible you t …
answered Feb 28 by SamBC
9
votes
I don't know about ungrammatical, but it certainly seems unnatural. It would be more usual to have: The pharmaceutical company Avalon was sued for causing Michael's autism. When it's a group or …
answered Mar 29 by SamBC
4
votes
Yes. That is completely normal, and you will see it in technical documents a fair amount. It's maddeningly non-specific, but entirely expected. If you are going to interviews, be prepared for them to …
answered Feb 21 by SamBC
3
votes
Public, under most circumstances, is an adjective. The grammar you have used would indicate that it was a mass noun, which it is not. The public can be thought of as a set phrase that means "people i …
answered Mar 1 by SamBC
1
vote
This is a point of difference between English dialects. I think most dialects used for formal registers would not use the there, at least not in the formal register. However, if we are talking about a …
answered Feb 23 by SamBC

15 30 50 per page