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This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

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Accredited status means that you have the status of being accredited. Accreditation status refers to your status of being accredited or not. Thus someone might ask what your accreditation status is, a …
answered Feb 2 by SamBC
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You're reading a book from 1891. Patterns of English usage have changed. Recommend now consistently is used in this sort of pattern: A recommended B to C. The word order can change, for instance …
answered Feb 28 by SamBC
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Well, firstly the plural of foot is feet. No 's'. The nearest of those to unambiguously mean what you want is the fourth. The first (ignoring the obvious error) could mean a number of things in diffe …
answered Mar 3 by SamBC
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Trivial is a completely normal, everyday part of the English language. It isn't going to be one of the first words kids learn to use, but it should be understood by secondary school age, if not earlie …
answered Mar 13 by SamBC
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It's the "try to get" sense, second verb one, in Cambridge. Or the next one, regarding risk; it could be read either way, and I really don't see the two as being entirely distinct. To court arrest is …
answered Apr 13 by SamBC
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If you're just looking for a job that doesn't involve physical work, regardless of whether it's intellectually demanding, you want office job or desk job. Office job is slightly preferred in British E …
answered Apr 5 by SamBC
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"Pulsatingly" is a perfectly reasonable coinage that fulfils all expectations of how the word is formed. Spellchecks won't like it, but that's par for the course. Use it in most places and no-one woul …
answered Feb 6 by SamBC
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One of the meanings of to resolve is summarised as 'decide', but it has additional nuances over to decide. As Cambridge Dictionaries puts it, it means "to make a decision formally or with determinatio …
answered Mar 13 by SamBC
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Test run can be used in the same way as one noun sense of test, but it does have a more specific meaning. The sense of test in question is that in "run some tests", as opposed to "I had a science tes …
answered Mar 17 by SamBC
3
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Not is acting as an emphatic. It means that the speaker wouldn't let them do it if they didn't pay the person they are speaking to. It is particularly strongly emphasising that that is a strong reason …
answered Mar 21 by SamBC
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I can understand being confused between different noun definitions, but in this case it's the original, literal, physical definition - a building (or a part of a building) for horses (or occasionally …
answered Apr 15 by SamBC
5
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No. A sucker is someone who's an easy mark, credulous, easy to trick. A suck-up is someone who sucks up a lot. To explain further... If you wanted to construct a noun in the same manner as sucker fro …
answered Mar 12 by SamBC
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Yes. To "go through" something, or (generally referring to events in the pasts) "be through" something is used to refer to completing some sort of task on a set of things. It is most generally applica …
answered Mar 20 by SamBC
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The relationship between "get" and "have" is so obvious to a native speaker that we may have trouble actually seeing it clearly. I don't know technical terms to explain it, but I would put it thus... …
answered Feb 1 by SamBC
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To [verb] on means to continue to [verb], generally in the same manner or direction as you were before.1 Thus, to swim on means to keep on swimming, probably in the same direction as they were before …
answered Apr 6 by SamBC

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