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is for questions about whether or not a particular phrase or sentence is a usual or common way that fluent English speakers might express something.

0
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I am a native speaker of American English. I can figure out what the example sentence means, but the sentence does not sound natural to me. As dwilli pointed out, Not everything that appears to …
answered Jul 20 '18 by Jasper
12
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Here is a rhetorical question that makes the original poster's point: If you don't believe in yourself, who will?
answered Apr 5 by Jasper
10
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This sentence is grammatically correct, and unambiguously expresses your intended meaning. To my (American) ear, it sounds like a nineteenth-century novel. It does not sound natural to me. "As must …
answered Jun 24 '17 by Jasper
3
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In this context, the choice of verb depends on the kind of course being taught. If the course is a seminar, or another style of course where the students actively share their own ideas, "led" or "con …
answered Apr 2 by Jasper
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"[G]et my thoughts in order" sounds natural to me. I probably would not use this expression myself, but I have known people who did. Depending on the context, here are some less formal ways to fill …
answered Jul 24 '18 by Jasper
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Both examples in the original post are grammatically correct. The original poster's proposed definition is better than the dictionary definition. Peepholes can be made on purpose, or can occur natur …
answered May 8 by Jasper