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The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

2
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In this sense, yes. "Far apart" is always used when comparing two specified places or things. "Far away" can have one of the things implied, usually the speaker's or listener's location. Chicag …
answered Jun 5 by David Siegel
1
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All of the listed forms are perfectly acceptable and feel natural to me. It has been turned off from the main socket. could also be It has been turned off at the main socket. and i thin …
answered Jun 7 by David Siegel
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The first two sound very unnatural. I would not use the word "section" as a verb in this context. I would say things such as: Part the hair in the center. Divide the hair into two sections. …
answered May 27 by David Siegel
4
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If one is going to use "priced" I would suggest "priced at", but far more natural would be I want one of the dollar-fifty cokes, please. One could also specify by size: I'd like three of the …
answered May 29 by David Siegel
1
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I would not say Let me stick it for you. I might say: Let me stick it (back) on for you. I would be more likely to say Let (re)fasten it for you. but that is a matter of style. I w …
answered May 7 by David Siegel
1
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"Buffering" applies to the quite specific case where a video must be loaded into the memory of a digital device before it can be displayed. The memory used for this purpose is known as a "buffer". "Bu …
answered Apr 12 by David Siegel
1
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Yes In AmE, I hear "rooting for" far more often than "support" in this sense, and I pretty much never hear "supporters" used to mean "fans of". But "Which team are you a fan of" is more common yet. …
answered Jun 8 by David Siegel
1
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Fore one thing the sentance: It looks like that it's gonna rain today. is incorrect. One should not use "lile that" in such a construction, and "gonna" is rather informal particularly for writing. O …
answered Apr 26 by David Siegel
5
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I, for one, hear a significant difference between "still" and "steal" or "steel". I would call the vowel sound that I make, and typically hear, in "still" a "short-I", while I would call the vowel sou …
answered Jul 10 by David Siegel