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An Article is used before a noun to indicate if the noun is something particular (the) or a member of a class (a/an).

2
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Both are grammatical, and in the examples the meaning is very similar. "Time for change" implies a general or broad change, and perhaps implies that change is needed but the speaker is not saying what …
answered Dec 26 '20 by David Siegel
1
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To complicate things further, the example that use a definite article in the question could omit it with little if any change in meaning, and the ones which do not use it could have it added, again wi …
answered Jul 13 '19 by David Siegel
2
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The use of articles in (5) is fine, but it might be better split into two sentences. Perhaps: (5) Students stand up for the teacher when the teacher leaves the classroom. …
answered Oct 25 '21 by David Siegel
1
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That should indeed be "a match can be a device made of wood or paper" The articles are needed in this construction. …
answered Nov 20 '21 by David Siegel
1
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I would treat He has a poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. as an elided form of He has a poorly controlled case of diabetes mellitus. ( by the way "mellitus" derives from "mel", a now obsole …
answered Jul 11 '19 by David Siegel
5
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And which nouns take articles changes over time, sometimes rather quickly, and may differ between varieties of English. Indian English, in particular, may differ from US English. …
answered Sep 16 '19 by David Siegel
1
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The normal form here would be: ... but I didn't have such an option on my phone. An indefinite article is used because the missing option is one of several options that the phone might posses (b …
answered Jun 3 '19 by David Siegel
1
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Generally the definite article 'the" is used to refer to a group as a group: The French are noted for their consumption of wine. The rich are often assumed to be arrogant. The beach is a po …
answered Jun 8 '19 by David Siegel
17
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The sentence Since the train was delayed for more than an hour, passengers were given a full refund. is formally ambiguous. One cannot tell from the sentence alone whether the passengers were gi …
answered Apr 22 '19 by David Siegel
0
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Yes Take the torch to light up your way. is perfectly acceptable. It implies that there is a specific torch being refereed to. This might be mentioned later, or implied by context. This usage would …
answered Dec 15 '20 by David Siegel
1
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The sentence: The projections should be viewed in perspective, considering that alarmist Malthusian fears of inability to provide for more than a billion people on earth did not come true. is g …
answered Jun 22 '19 by David Siegel
1
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Repeated articles can be omitted (and are implied if omitted). …
answered Dec 10 '20 by David Siegel
1
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Indeed "the train" is often used for "trains as a general concept" as is "the bus" and "the plane". So is "the road". It can cost much less than the train. could be understood as short for I …
answered Jun 3 '19 by David Siegel
4
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"The"+{adjective} is often used to make a noun phrase meaning "the category or set of things that are {adjective}". For example: Lewis Carrol's "Alice" books create a new form of the absurd. …
answered Apr 26 '19 by David Siegel
1
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As a developer, I would write this as "the return status" meaning "the status value returned by the function being tested". It could be written as "check that the function has a return status of STATU …
answered Jun 14 '19 by David Siegel

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