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The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

-3
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You can say only "to give an autograph" For the reason of this use, look at the graph.
answered Apr 20 by user307254
-2
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According to the ngram only the second variant is found in printed works.
answered May 3 by user307254
3
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MEDICINE can be used both as a countable and uncountable noun. So we can say: "Here is some medicine" (uncountable noun) or "Here are some medicines" (countable noun). See the entry from Oxford …
answered Jul 2 by user307254