Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 9259
1
vote
Depending on the context and the tense, the following sentences are possible: Now he plays the guitar as much/long as she plays the piano. Now he plays the guitar as long/much as she used to play … the piano. Now he plays the guitar as skillfully and as much/long as she plays the piano. He would play the guitar as skillfully and as long/much as she would play the piano. …
answered Jun 10 '16 by Khan
0
votes
Usually, we use as necessary, if necessary, when necessary, etc. that can be used for all tenses. I think it is unnecessary to use "was" and "it was" in the first two phrases . So the third phrase "The general public has/have never dealt with it as seriously as necessary" seems suitable. …
answered Oct 3 '14 by Khan
2
votes
As as a preposition is also used to say what a person considers a person or thing is. For example, I regard or think of him as my friend. According to Oxford Dictionary, 'think of as' is a phrasal … verb that implies to consider someone or something in a particular way. For example, I think of this place as my home. When you use the verbs regard or think of in the said sense, you must use the …
answered Jul 1 '16 by Khan
2
votes
The idiomatic phrases "as for" and "as to" mean with respect to, concerning, about, etc. These phrases are interchangeable when you introduce a subject related to what you have just been spoken of … , without any difference in meaning, as follows: He is very fat. As for/to his wife, she is very thin. We have trained staff to run the business. As for/to the money, we'll borrow it from our bank …
answered Jan 9 '15 by Khan
1
vote
I think there's nothing wrong with the sentence presented by the OP. Look at another example as follows: When I get tired, such as when I am working on my computer, I turn to biscuits (Collins Dictionary). …
answered Jul 22 '16 by Khan