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This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

3
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When you compare two things, people or situations, you use than. For example, I am taller than you. Your car is more expensive than my car. Life is harder in our country than in your country. The ad …
answered Nov 10 '14 by Khan
1
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Both the phrases mean a large number, amount or quantity of. So there is no difference in meaning between "I have a lot of friends" and "I have lots of friends". These phrases are informal. The phrase "lots of" is more informal. They are almost interchangeable. …
answered Oct 2 '14 by Khan
1
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If the plan is carried out smoothly..... The conjunction "if" is also used in imaginary and conditional sentences. It's used for saying that one thing can or will happen depending on the happening o …
answered May 7 '15 by Khan
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Which school are you in? Which school were in? Which school are you at? Which school were you at? (BE) Although these sentences are grammatically correct, they are not common in use. Instead, the …
answered Nov 30 '14 by Khan
0
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I don't think there's any significant difference in meaning between these sentences. Both the sentences are indicative that Tu Pee, because of its hunger, was able to eat a horse. The only subtle …
answered Nov 26 '15 by Khan
1
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There's is no difference in meaning between endeavouring and endeavoring. In fact, words that end in -our in British English end in -or in American English. For example, colour, neighbour, humour, etc. in British English are spelled as color, neighbor, humor, etc. in American English. …
answered Jan 14 '16 by Khan
1
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mentioned by the PO. Accordingly, I don't find any difference in meaning of "come off and take place" except that (per these dictionaries) "come off" is informal and "take place" is common both in …
answered Oct 24 '14 by Khan
0
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common in use. I think there is a little difference in meaning of these phrases. When we say much the same, we mean almost or exactly the same equipment. However, when we say much of the same equipment, we mean a large amount of the same equipment. …
answered Aug 28 '14 by Khan
1
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I think the adjective "possessed" with the preposition "of" and "with" are used in different senses, hence not interchangeable. As you know, we use "possessed of" to mean to have or own, and we use po …
answered Nov 22 '14 by Khan
1
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It's more idiomatic to say it's time, without an article in front of time, when we use the form it's followed by a past subjunctive or to-infinitive. It's time to celebrate the New Year.
answered Jun 21 '16 by Khan
1
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Yes, they convey the same sense. However, the former is better as the repetition of "costs" in the latter is unnecessary.
answered Feb 7 '16 by Khan
1
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Sometimes, when you go a short distance on foot, you use walk followed by over to. For examples: The policeman walked over to me and asked for my identity. Walk over here. I want to talk to you.
answered May 15 '16 by Khan
26
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There is a difference in meaning between “a little” and “little”. The meaning of “a little” is positive. It means some or a small amount, such as, “I have a little money.”, “He made a little … progress.”, etc. If we look at these sentences, the difference between “a little” and “little” will come across easily. The former may be satisfactory for a particular purpose while the latter is not. …
answered Oct 1 '14 by Khan
1
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The answer to this question is quite simple. When we talk about passengers we mean only passengers, not passengers + pilot + engineer + officers +other crew or staff working on the aircraft, which fly …
answered Oct 2 '14 by Khan
2
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I think it's more common and natural to say "on television" if you refer to broadcast by television; the use of the article "the" is optional and uncommon. So we can't say that the use of "the" is gr …
answered Apr 4 '15 by Khan

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