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Results tagged with Search options user 94

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the sound, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

1
vote
When the is followed by a vowel sound, it is usually pronounced /ðiː/ (dhee), so that the e sounds like the ee in see or fee. When the is followed by a consonant sound, it is usually pronounced /ðə/ …
answered Jan 31 '13 by ctype.h
10
votes
I'll and all are homophones in many dialects, including mine. In many other dialects, I'll, isle, and aisle are homophones. Generally, either of these pronunciations will apply. It seems that the firs …
answered Mar 15 '13 by ctype.h
18
votes
3answers
Speakers of languages such as Italian and Spanish tend to have difficulty pronouncing the 'I' in words such as it and is correctly. For example, they might pronounce "it is" as "eat ease." Are there …
asked Jan 27 '13 by ctype.h
8
votes
No, it is pronounced /ˈɹɑndeɪ̯ˌvu/ (ron-day-voo). Rendezvous comes from the French rendez-vous, meaning a meeting or appointment, and its pronunciation was very much influenced by French pronunciation. …
answered Feb 1 '13 by ctype.h
1
vote
I can think of only one rule for th not being pronounced as [θ] or [ð]. If t and h are part of separate syllables, then they are pronounced separately, e.g. lighthouse. The h may or may not be silent …
answered Mar 21 '13 by ctype.h
1
vote
I don't think there is any general rule that can be applied in every case; you just have to know which words have silent letters. A silent e is often employed to modify the pronunciation of the … preceding vowel, functioning much like a diacritic would in many other languages. For example, in at and ate, the a is pronounced differently. In cases like this, the silent letter serves to disambiguate written words and indicate pronunciation. …
answered Feb 3 '13 by ctype.h