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Results tagged with Search options user 95517

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

3
votes
When you use the phrase "law enforcement" as a collective noun, you treat it as singular. Police is plural, police officer is singular. As a side note, if you were looking for a plural, you would ha …
answered Sep 3 by Valkor
7
votes
While people encroaching on a road might functionally close it, close has an official connotation. It can also suggest either a temporary or long term closure. Blocked is ambiguous, and could be appl …
answered May 16 by Valkor
0
votes
You should use both. It is clear and still concise. If you must choose, use capability because it the more fundamental problem.
answered May 15 by Valkor
0
votes
Both sentences are correct. "Raining" is a very tricky one because it is actually a gerund. It is functioning as a noun in this sentence.
answered Jul 24 by Valkor
1
vote
Swinging is a very unusual way to describe this, as FumbleFingers noted in comments. To strictly answer your question, no, it would not be a natural use. However, if you are trying to emphasize a par …
answered May 16 by Valkor
1
vote
Using your title as a Google query, there are many articles discussing this question, and with varying conclusions. The short answer is that the word is too new to be right or wrong yet. Consider your …
answered Sep 3 by Valkor
3
votes
Thank you for linking to the post where the statement originated. It explains the very odd, and perfectly correct, syntax of (thing occurs) with a (percent) chance. The most concise you should make t …
answered Jul 24 by Valkor
0
votes
The term mnemonic is the best fit to describe a remember-word, but in English it can also commonly refer to a song or rhyme.
answered Aug 8 by Valkor