The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 9161

This tag is for questions seeking a word that fits a meaning. If you actually seek a phrase, or don't care, see the "phrase-request" tag.

3
votes
When I'm being served coffee by a business, like at a cafe or on a plane by a flight attendant, the assumption is that they have some prepackaged amount available, so I just respond with the number of …
answered Oct 19 '15 by ColleenV
3
votes
Usually in AmE, the pilot of a vehicle is doing whatever the vehicle is doing. "The driver stopped the car at the red light." and "The driver stopped at the red light." both say the same thing. So i …
answered Mar 11 '16 by ColleenV
2
votes
Often companies that sell refurbished items will have a trade-in program where the seller may get cash for their used item, although usually they get store credit like at Amazon or GameStop. These pr …
answered Mar 17 '16 by ColleenV
2
votes
Depending on how precise you want to be, "Egg Yellow" or "Egg Yolk Yellow" works in English as well. For example, Egg Yolk Yellow (1235C) Rosco E-Colour+ #768 Egg Yolk Yellow (48" x 25') Rol …
answered Aug 23 '18 by ColleenV
1
vote
As has been mentioned in the comments, usually the name of the sale is a shortened form of the terms of the promotion, like "Buy one, get one" or "Buy one, get one half off". Sometimes "Buy one, get o …
answered Mar 11 '16 by ColleenV
0
votes
With no context, I don't know of a verb that distinguishes making a list of items with alphabetical labels from a list with numerical labels. The action is creating the list, so most verbs are disting …
answered Jun 8 '15 by ColleenV
0
votes
Some good synonyms are Trail Off and Ramble. – lurker Dec 27 '15 at 21:09 Sometimes trail off can refer to volume, where the speaker doesn't change the subject, but just starts mumbling. – J.R.♦ D …
answered Aug 7 '18 by ColleenV
6
votes
I think the class of jobs you've used to explain the term would fall under street hustling. Hustling often means prostitution or selling drugs, but can also be used for "off-the-books" jobs that migh …
answered Jul 23 '16 by ColleenV
1
vote
I'm not sure if "constant growth" captures your meaning. Growth, in the sense of career opportunities, is generally a positive thing. Exponential or rapid growth is very good, but constant, or steady, …
answered May 8 '15 by ColleenV
2
votes
I think that "artwork label" or just "label" is the most appropriate word. I found an example of that usage on a "Practical Art World" blog. I have also found "wall tag" as an alternative. I don't lik …
answered Jul 26 '17 by ColleenV
0
votes
One colloquial way to say that might be "singing the blues". For example: "Our cab driver sang the blues about having to work three jobs to support his family, but I think he was just looking for …
answered Nov 18 '16 by ColleenV
1
vote
The term that first came to mind was self-deprecating: tending or serving to disparage or undervalue oneself, but it doesn’t have a negative connotation. You could make it negative by adding “excessi …
answered Aug 28 by ColleenV
1
vote
I think there isn’t a specific word for an “armor holder” because we don’t have heavy suits of armor that need to be suspended that way. We do have other heavy things that we suspend to work on, like …
answered Sep 10 by ColleenV
11
votes
The first thing that springs to mind is fashionista: a person who follows trends in the fashion industry obsessively and strives continually to adopt the latest fashions. Some see fashionista as a pos …
answered Feb 16 '16 by ColleenV
2
votes
If you're not actually playing a game and you're just trying to use gestures to communicate because of a language barrier, you could say something like He mimed driving a car hoping that the local …
answered Apr 10 by ColleenV
1
vote
On a resume, you should only need to label the things that are not work related. I assume that everything on your resume is related to your work unless you tell me otherwise, so I think "Projects" wou …
answered Feb 24 '16 by ColleenV
1
vote
The only phrase that I can come up with other than "social anxiety", which Peter has already mentioned, is "fear of humiliation". In her book Fear and Other Uninvited Guests, psychologist Harriet …
answered Feb 27 '16 by ColleenV
2
votes
The term I would use is courtyard, although there are some courtyards that are accessible from outside the building (only partially enclosed by the building walls) as well as those that are completely …
answered Jun 4 '16 by ColleenV
1
vote
I found this PDF from the University of North Carolina Wilmington titled Organization of a Traditional Academic Paper that I think is a very helpful description of each of the traditional sections of …
answered Jun 27 '17 by ColleenV
1
vote
The simplest alternative to "use crutches" or "walk with crutches" is "to crutch". A onelegged sailor crutched himself round MacConnell's corner, skirting Rabaiotti's icecream car, and jerked him …
answered Feb 5 '18 by ColleenV
16
votes
I would use “drawback”, meaning “an objectionable feature”. For example, I really like that car, but the low gas mileage is a huge drawback that I can’t overlook. “Drawback” is less suitable fo …
answered May 31 by ColleenV
0
votes
Doors tend to be described by the action you take to open them. Your example is a "drop-down" door. There may be other names for a particular style of door, but if you need the most generic way to exp …
answered Aug 9 '17 by ColleenV
11
votes
I would call it a {baby/kid/child} handstand or headstand. If I search Google images for those phrases, the image in your post comes up, as well as some other examples (click for larger size). Han …
answered May 1 '16 by ColleenV
5
votes
I think you might be thinking of squelch or a "wet sucking sound". If you fell into a swimming pool fully dressed, your shoes would squelch as you walked after you got out of the pool. I remember it …
answered Jul 16 '16 by ColleenV
6
votes
The heater in the pictures is called a radiator in the US and UK. It can be either hot water or steam (I don't believe the oil-filled radiators are very common in the US, but they may be in some areas …
answered Dec 5 '16 by ColleenV
5
votes
Mashed is the correct word. A potato fritter recipe on cooking.com has the directions Boil in plenty of salted water until cooked through. As soon as they have cooled enough to handle, peel the p …
answered Dec 18 '14 by ColleenV
0
votes
I took two years off to prepare for the IIT-JEE but was not successful in achieving that goal. The phrase "not successful" in this sentence is neutral to me. The main problem is "that goal" is re …
answered Aug 10 '16 by ColleenV
1
vote
I would probably say "crime-ridden" - dominated or plagued by crime. This part of the city is crime-ridden. This part of the city is plagued by crime. This part of the city is infested with c …
answered Feb 3 '16 by ColleenV
2
votes
I will arrive there at about 8 o'clock or a little later (i.e. at 8:05 or 8:15...) I have read about 10 books on Chinese history or a few more (i.e. maybe 11 or 12, I'm not sure). She looks …
answered Apr 22 '16 by ColleenV
0
votes
I would suggest Natural Law. The idea behind natural law is that we can use reason to recognize some values and rights that we have because we are human. One of the most famous expressions of this ide …
answered Apr 18 '16 by ColleenV

15 30 50 per page