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The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

3
votes
It's conversational and elliptical, and means "Perhaps John is the better person to ask" either because John would know the answer or it's in John's area of responsibility, or something along those l …
answered Dec 11 '18 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
5
votes
The phrase explode in our faces there is a figurative, not a literal, expression. Literally it means "to blow up (like a bomb) unexpectedly". Figuratively, it means that the situation suddenly turne …
answered Jul 19 '18 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
How much guitar.... is grammatical. I think it's analogous to this transitive: How much food do you eat each day? You eat how much food per day? How much distance do you travel each day? …
answered Jul 6 '18 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
Yes you can ask "Can I use your phone a little". The question would not imply that you need to place a single call. You either want to place several calls or you want to use the phone for some other p …
answered Jul 6 '18 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
2
votes
Sometimes the past tense is used in a question when the speaker is unsure of information given earlier in the conversation, perhaps because of a faulty memory, or would like the other person to repeat …
answered Jul 5 '18 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
0
votes
I didn't watch the film, but "it's just that ...." is often used to introduce the reason for some discontent, issue, trouble, or concern. "It" refers to the situation that is the basis for the feel …
answered Oct 11 '17 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
You can say this, but there are better alternatives. It would need all the hyphens (so, "father-in-law-to-be") but I don't like it. I'd just say "future father-in-law". If you jilt the bride-to-be o …
answered Sep 27 '17 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
key can be an adjective (of paramount importance, necessary, critical, crucial) or a noun.
answered Jul 29 '17 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
4
votes
If you wish to "reciprocate the good vibe" you could ask for a "rain check". Literally a rain check is a voucher one receives when a game or other event with paid admission is cancelled because of in …
answered Oct 16 '16 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
The underlying metaphor is that of the "sympathetic string" on a musical instrument, which vibrates when another string is plucked or strummed. So, when you say that something resonates with you, you …
answered Apr 3 '16 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
5
votes
I got it done can mean either: I had someone do it for me or I managed to complete it. I got my homework done before class this morning. I got a cavity in my molar filled. She got her …
answered Nov 12 '15 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
1
vote
Imagine that when person "A" says "this" or "that", he and the person spoken to (person "B") are looking at the same thing. It's as if they are pointing at the thing with a finger. Now, when someone …
answered Dec 20 '14 by Tᴚoɯɐuo
2
votes
In American English, "might" is used as a request only if the person being asked to perform the request has already volunteered. I know you're very busy. Is there anything I can do to help? -- Y …
answered Dec 13 '14 by Tᴚoɯɐuo