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Results tagged with Search options user 5893

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the sound, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

36
votes
/ sound. From a pure phonetic perspective, the actual pronunciation of word-final /z/ in English often has very little voicing. This is surprising if you're expecting /z/ to be voiced and /s/ to be … would only perceive a word like 'apples' as ending with /s/ if the pronunciation of the preceding /əl/ were very short. …
answered Dec 27 '15 by Paul Dexter
3
votes
First things first, vowel pronunciation in English varies widely between dialects. I'm going to answer as a native speaker from the US west coast. Also first things first, eight and ate are … homonyms, both phonemically as /et/. it is /ɪt/. eat is /it/. However, the actual pronunciation of these words varies considerably depending on the surrounding words in the phrase. Let's assume the words …
answered Aug 4 '18 by Paul Dexter
1
vote
The closest English words to [tʂɑŋ] would be the names Jon [dʒɑn] or John (also [dʒɑn] in my dialect of English). Another somewhat close word is song [sɑŋ].
answered Mar 11 '18 by Paul Dexter
1
vote
Yes, at least I do (from US west coast, but I think it's the same elsewhere in the US). These phrases are a bit confusing because they're normally contracted as well. I would say flaps in: Where' …
answered Jul 15 '18 by Paul Dexter
0
votes
In unstressed syllables, all the lax vowels /ɛ/, /ɪ/, /ʊ/, /ʌ/ are collapsed to /ə/. This means that native speakers don't notice the difference between these vowels in the (unstressed) second syllabl …
answered Apr 23 by Paul Dexter