80

It is a pun on the name of the Dutch artist M. C. Escher (the initials stand for Maurits Cornelis, but the full names are almost never used), who is famous for mathematically precise prints of surreal spaces that seem to fold into themselves or "go around" where nothing ought to go around. For example, look at Waterfall or Möbius Strip II. An esker is ...


73

Whether you say a or an is determined by the pronunciation of the next word, and nothing else. If the next word begins with a consonant sound (not necessarily a consonant letter!), you say a, and if it begins with a vowel sound (not necessarily a vowel letter!), you say an. So yes, you are correct: if you write or read "SP", you would say "an SP", because "...


61

It's one way of showing plurals that is used with acronyms. It's widely-used, but whether it is correct is the subject of debate. It may be best to avoid its use in formal or professional documents. Generally, CPUs will always be considered valid, while CPU's may or may not be (this applies to other acronyms). You may find these resources interesting: ...


59

The expression is used to call out (= to draw attention of others upon) a lie or a negligent or deceitful mistake. As you have found already, BS stands for bullshit, a profanity that basically means "nonsense". The verb "to call" can mean "to cry out", and it is often used when someone says something short in order to stop everybody else from going further....


54

You typically don't spell out shorthand or acronyms for units of measurement, especially if the shorthand is not easily pronounceable. In this case, say "gigabytes". Colloquially, native speakers may also say "gigs".


45

Punctuation is a matter of style. Here, 's is almost certainly used to pluralize the initialism CPU, but whether this is appropriate depends on which style manual you, your editor, or your organization follows. The New York Times stylebook, which is derived in large measure from Associated Press style, has this to say about plural abbreviations: Use ...


45

To call is to declare a decision or judgment, especially in a game or contest, but in any context where the participants are expected to abide by certain rules. For example The referee called the ball out. (sport) I call heads. (a coin toss) I call foul. (the speaker believes his or her adversary has broken a rule or has acted in an ...


40

No. When "US", "UK", "UN", "UAE" etc are used as nouns, they have the definite article "the" preceding them. We are going to the US next week. The UK held a referendum on EU membership. The issue will be raised at the UN. However, when they are used attributively, as though they were adjectives, there is no article. UK law prohibits ...


27

"G" is "Ground Floor". In some countries, the bottommost floor of a building is the ground floor, and the floor above that is the first floor. In the US, ground floor and first floor are used interchangeably, with the next floor up being the second floor. "M" is "Mezzanine". This is sort of a "half floor" that doesn't extend across the entire span of the ...


24

These are actually called acronyms or initialisms. The few editing guides I checked (like this one from the American Psychological Association) say to use this guide: The general rule for indefinite articles [before acronyms] is to use a before consonants and an before vowels. The trick here is to use your ears (how the acronym is pronounced), not your ...


23

With units of measurement like that, you write them without any plural marker, but say them with the plural marker Examples: 64GB → Sixty-four gigabytes 1GB → One gigabyte 30km → Thirty kilometers 1L → One liter 2L → Two liters As for saying 'Gee Bee' instead of gigabytes, that's harder to answer, and ...


20

You say I/we/etc. call B.S. when someone is being insincere, untruthful, or when something is false, misleading, or some similar circumstance. It generally means you don't believe someone. You can similarly just say "B.S." or "bullshit". For example A: I ate three cheeseburgers for lunch today. B: I call B.S. Two, maybe. But not three. A: I pulled ...


17

It means that the person is a Republican member of Congress from the state of Tennessee. The "(X-YY)" convention is widely used in the news media to refer to current and former members of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate, with X denoting the person's political party (usually R for Republican or D for Democratic) and YY denoting the state he or ...


16

Because when you pronounce 'SEO', it starts with the vowel 'es' (listen to it), in Hindi- 'ए' (एसीओ). The rule of articles apply the way we 'pronounce' the word. When you write it the full term - Search engine optimizer, you pronounce each word differently so it is 'a search engine optimizer' (अ सर्च एंजिन ओप्टिमाईज़र) Even further, if you pronounce SEO ...


14

I would say: OP = over-powered


14

sb is an abbreviation for somebody. sth is an abbreviation for something. The sentence means tell somebody to do something. In real life, any person and any thing can be included in the sentence, for example, tell [your student] to [complete their homework]. A dictionary should explain this. Can you use these words in your essays? No. They are not real ...


12

True. The letter is described to show '1000'. The prefix 'kilo' is derived from the Greek word chilioi or khilioi. Its short form was used for the metric system. I still remember the first time I heard of 'K' used for 1000 other than kilogram or kilometer was when the 'Y2K' bug threatened the entire world! I was curious to know and discovered that it was '...


12

Dictionaries traditionally use a lot of abbreviations. This is because, like everything else, they used to just be printed volumes, not online resources, and they were trying to cram as much information into a small a space as possible. Thus, they developed abbreviations for parts of speech, like v. for verb, for characteristics of different words, like ...


12

I found the following on Urban Dictionary. h/t hat tip; tip of the hat Apple is releasing their <insert new slick thingmabob here>. H/t to <insert blog here>, who alerted us of this story. Senator Holierthanthou has been caught with his pants down in public. H/t to originalposter who broke the news. So it sounds like the author is ...


11

I've left a comment already, and the OP has already selected the accepted answer, but I feel compelled to leave a full answer of my own because it feels like there are a number of loose ends. First, it's well established that the use of a vs. an is determined by the sound that comes next, not necessarily the written letter. The Chicago Manual of Style (...


8

They don't, because the word used is "senior", not "elder". ("Senior" is abbreviated "Sr.") When referring to relatives, "elder" is most often used for siblings. In this context, its opposite is "younger". Since these are comparative terms rather than labels, there is not generally a need to abbreviate them.


8

The SI prefix for a thousand is kilo-, officially abbreviated as k—for instance, prefixed to "metre" or its abbreviation m, kilometre or km signifies a thousand metres. As such, people occasionally represent the number in a non-standard notation by replacing the last three zeros of the general numeral with "k": for instance, 30k for 30,000.


8

A Google search for "MA March or May" returns several results stating that in two-letter abbreviations for best before dates, MR stands for March and MA stands for May. From the Canadian Food Inspection Agency: The bilingual symbols for the months in the durable life date are as follows [B.01.007(5), FDR]: JA for JANUARY FE for FEBRUARY MR for MARCH AL ...


7

'K' is short for 1,000. It comes from 'kilo'.


7

The main reason for which this method was created is to avoid repetition of the full name. You will write first the full name followed by the abbreviation in parentheses. Later on, whenever want to use the term in text, write only the abbreviation. Recently, I have found an useful link to the American Society for Microbiology’s site where are discussed ...


7

Ok, following your comments about "outlook resources inc" being the name of the company, clears this up a little. In the USA this would more conventionally be written "Outlook Resources, Inc" - capitalizing the first letter of each word, and a comma between the name and the fact that it is "Incorporated". The fact that it was not written like this made it ...


7

H.E. stands for His Excellency. This is just a type of honorary title used to address government officials like presidents, envoys, ambassadors et cetera during official visits, presidential summits and the like. For female dignitaries, you would say Her Excellency. This is, however, not practiced in western countries. For more information about this ...


6

In English and American academic usage cf. is used only with its original Latin meaning: conferre, “compare”. It usually points readers to arguments and opinions contrary to those just described, with the sense “but compare this to”. At one time you might encounter vide for “see”, but that is hopelessly oldfashioned now. In fact, the major US academic ...


6

Practice varies from publisher to publisher, but these are common abbreviations: K for thousands of dollars, Euros, etc. is a relatively recent adoption from computing and is not yet much used in formal contexts. The usual abbreviations for million and billion are M (or m) and B (or b); you may also encounter Mn (mn) and Bn (bn), particularly with ...


6

At the beginning of a sentence, capitalize the first letter: E.g., a sentence like this one. Inside a sentence, both letters go in lower case: Both letters go in lower case, i.e., neither is capitalized. Capitalization for Latin abbreviations works the same as if you were to spell out the words (which no one ever does). They're not acronyms. The ...


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