4

Basically, I would say that "and cetera" is NOT going to be understandable immediately, by everyone. Nor do I understand your logic - "et" is Latin too, so I think you should stick with the 'status quo' and keep both halves in the same language. Incidentally the & symbol is itself a contraction/ligature of 'et' if I remember correctly, so '&c' is ...


4

Not very common. But it would always be pronounced "eye ee" /ai i:/ The Latin phrase is not well known by English speakers. It is more likely that a speaker would say "that is" instead of speaking "i.e."


3

"M.O." stands for modus operandi, which is a Latin phrase that literally means "way of operating." In casual English, it means "the usual way a specific person does a particular activity." The really important part of that definition is "specific person." You don't use it to describe the typical way any person would do something; you use M.O. when you're ...


3

You are just missing that in rapid speech, auxiliary verbs become reduced and so "how did" can become pronounced as "how'd", and this is a casual, but acceptable, representation of the spoken language. I would put it on roughly the same level of informality as writing "gonna" instead of "going to". These contractions are common in casual or colloquial ...


3

A.k.a. Or aka means (and is an abbreviation for) “also known as”. It is used when someone has another name or title, such as “James Brown, aka the Godfather of Soul” https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/aka (I personally always thought of James Brown’s aka as “the hardest working man in show business,” but that’s not really important here)...


3

Originally, Mrs., pronounced "missus" was used for a married woman and Miss for an unmarried woman. More recently, Ms., pronounced "miz" had been introduced to mean any woman, regardless of her marital status. Some women choose to go by this because they don't want to be defined by whether they're married. Spelling them as an abbreviation with a full stop ...


3

The pattern 1991-9 should be familiar to most English speakers because this format is sometimes used when referencing page numbers. For example, "pp. 23-5" means pages 23 through 25. But I don't recall seeing this form used for years. 1991-99 looks much more normal. Even more normal (and shorter) in casual writing is '91-'99 if it is not necessary to specify ...


2

If ambiguity is a concern then don't abbreviate at all. There isn't a standard abbreviation for "documentary" so say or write the word in full. This is unlike, for example, "romantic comedy" which does have a standard abbreviation "romcom". I'm not really interested in romcoms so I switched to the Discovery channel and watched a documentary about Lions ...


2

When speaking with a group of people who share a common interest you may encounter abbreviations such as the one you suggest. In which case using such terms can be be both efficient and also give a sense of belonging to group. However introducing a new abbreviation needs to be done with caution. In this case, unless you've seen subs in use elsewhere in ...


2

This reference Google books "random variable RV" on page 619 says "A random variable (often denoted RV) is a variable..." Pp. 619 and 624 show examples of the plural. RV, the abbreviation, should be in capital letters, and it should be pluralized as RVs, with the plural s in lower case. This is discussed here: Stack Exchange ELU apostrophe in abbrev. etc.


1

If you are writing to a particular style guide you could consult it to see if there is any particular guidance. You should also look to see if there is any established usage for the particular abbreviation, as the answer could differ for other abbreviations. In this case (and in most instances of initialisms), the established use is "RNGs" For example on ...


1

OTOH is an abbreviation for the phrase On The Other Hand It means to present factors which support opposing opinions.


1

It stands for As Far As I Know. AFAIK in British English messaging & social media ABBREVIATION FOR as far as I know https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/afaik


1

I can't find any reference of 'd being an abbreviation for did. What am I missing? It's not an abbreviation with a fixed number of valid things it can stand for. 'd means simply some letters have been ommitted, followed by a d - that's all. Apostrophes can stand for any missing letters. In this case, yes, it would be did.


1

This is strictly a question of style. Your best bet is to look at published literature in your field and see what others do. For what it's worth, if you search the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) for "as of Aug", "as of Jan", etc., you find very few hits overall that include just the month but not the day; and among those, only one hit comes ...


1

aka ( eɪ keɪ eɪ ) also a.k.a. aka is an abbreviation for 'also known as'. aka is used especially when referring to someone's nickname or stage name. ...the writer Barbara Vine, aka Ruth Rendell. https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/aka


1

"tl;dr" did originally mean "too long, didn't read". But some use it preemptively as if to say "I know this that I wrote is too long, and most won't read it, here is a short version". Personally I think the best way to use "tl;dr" is not to use it at all. It is disrespectful and dismissive. But many do not agree with that view.


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