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3

Originally, Mrs., pronounced "missus" was used for a married woman and Miss for an unmarried woman. More recently, Ms., pronounced "miz" had been introduced to mean any woman, regardless of her marital status. Some women choose to go by this because they don't want to be defined by whether they're married. Spelling them as an abbreviation with a full stop ...


3

The pattern 1991-9 should be familiar to most English speakers because this format is sometimes used when referencing page numbers. For example, "pp. 23-5" means pages 23 through 25. But I don't recall seeing this form used for years. 1991-99 looks much more normal. Even more normal (and shorter) in casual writing is '91-'99 if it is not necessary to specify ...


0

In my experience, by far the most common form in written language is etc. It is occasionally written in older texts as &c. (As Mike mentioned, &c. is basically the same as etc. after having gone through some typography changes.) I almost never see it written out as et cetera, and certainly not and cetera. Perhaps in legal documents it might be et ...


4

Basically, I would say that "and cetera" is NOT going to be understandable immediately, by everyone. Nor do I understand your logic - "et" is Latin too, so I think you should stick with the 'status quo' and keep both halves in the same language. Incidentally the & symbol is itself a contraction/ligature of 'et' if I remember correctly, so '&c' is ...


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