9

This is something that has varied with time. I believe that it was once more common to include dots in initialisms (such as F.B.I.) or acronyms (such as U.N.I.C.E.F.), but I think you'll have a harder time finding contemporary news articles with acronyms or initialisms using dots like that nowadays – at least, it was easier for me to find articles with ...


7

This issue has been addressed several times on ELU, including Plurals of acronyms, letters, numbers — use an apostrophe or not? , and What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym? The bottom line is it's largely a matter of stylistic preference whether to include an apostrophe or not in OP's exact context. To some extent, the average preference varies ...


5

From Wikipedia (UTC): Etymology The official abbreviation for Coordinated Universal Time is UTC. This abbreviation arose from a desire by the International Telecommunication Union and the International Astronomical Union to use the same abbreviation in all languages. English speakers originally proposed CUT (for "coordinated universal time"), while ...


5

I own lots of DVDs. DVD is an initialism, not an acronym. See here.


5

WASP is an American English acronym for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant. Consistent with the context, it is usually a derogatory term. It usually has connotations of "born into the ruling class." The fact that about half of Americans are white Protestants with at least some English ancestry does not seem to interfere with this stereotype. Perhaps it is ...


5

I had to look up Manifest; the Wikipedia entry indicates that it takes place in and around New York City. I am a non-enforcement employee of the NYPD. ECT is an abbreviation for Evidence Collection Team; there is a useful summary of the ECT’s role in the Wikipedia entry on NYPD Organization (and the rest of the Wikipedia entry is useful for ...


4

I have only heard aiso pronunciation in AmE. The numbers can be read different ways, but instead of saying "colon" you should say "part, section, article, etc.", depending on how those sections are indicated in the document


4

There is the word mnemonic about which Lexico says mnemonic NOUN A system such as a pattern of letters, ideas, or associations which assists in remembering something. the usual mnemonic for star types is O Be A Fine Girl Kiss Me It is pronounced with a silent initial m. It can be an acronym, such as BODMAS (Brackets, Orders, Division or ...


3

From my experience, it is usually from usage, but seems to follow an informal rule that if it looks like a pronounceable word it is often used that way and usually more than 3 letters. Examples of being used as a word are NATO - North Atlantic Treaty Organization FIFA - Fédération Internationale de Football Association NAFTA - North American Free ...


3

This is just my opinion, but I would say TPL is best because you are capturing significant parts of the word: TemPLate. The T stands for the first syllable, and the PL for the second.


3

In the past (perhaps a century ago), we would refer to "the widow Bush," to indicate that Kate's husband had died. But these days, there is no such convention, so instead we write, "Dear Mrs. Bush, Please accept our deepest condolences for the passing of your husband. We are very sorry for your loss," and then we continue writing whatever it is that we ...


3

This is nothing whatever to do with grammar. Nothing. It is about the meaning of words. For a speaker who retains the original meaning of the acronym, it is redundant: This is not necessarily a problem: we have plenty of redundancy in language. For a speaker to whom the acronym has become opaque, it is not even that: the acronym is simply a modifier for ...


3

If they are synonymous and the terms are regularly used interchangeably, it's probably fine. This term seems to have many different names. An electric vehicle charging station, also called EV charging station, electric recharging point, charging point, charge point and EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), is an element in an infrastructure that ...


3

There is no great, universal answer to your question. Sorry. "Answerer" works just fine though.


3

While the term "WASP" literally comes from the acronym "White Anglo-Saxon Protestant", it has come to connote not that literal demographic but a rather privileged and insular class/caste of American society, with very characteristic clothing, tastes, haunts, etc, which tends towards some forms of conservatism and defense of tradition and the status quo to ...


2

Strictly speaking, it's only an acronym if you can pronounce it as a word. Scuba & laser are 2 that spring to mind. Otherwise it's just an abbreviation.


2

It stands for Run Of Site. This means if you go for ROS, your advertisement in the form of banner, link, image, media or whatever will run on the targeted site. The page of that site could be any. However, a little difference you must understand is this. The source is Digital Marketing Glossary. Run of site or ROS is an ad buying option by which ad ...


2

Yes, use of the indefinite article is certainly most common before the names of such qualifications: I want to do an MA. I am doing a BTEC (or B.tech). It seems incorrect to me to not use an indefinite article before them. This is because they are shortened versions of the real words (MA = Master of Arts, for example), and we have omitted the word '...


2

The question asks if it is okay to write "electrical vehicle charging apparatus (EVSE)" when the EVSE is an abbreviation for "electrical vehicle supply equipment". The question overlooks one important point: a parenthesized text doesn't have to be the abbreviation of the noun that comes before it. For example, consider: The North American Telemark ...


2

Traditionally, when writing to a married lady or referring to her in writing, one would use her Husband's name, such as: Mrs. John Kennedy, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue... For a widow this would then revert to her own name, such as: Mrs Jackie Kennedy, ..... However, in modern times this cannot be assumed to be polite in all circumstances, as not all ...


2

Sure it's not "Chill Black Guy"? In this context, "chill" is used as an adjective to mean "relaxed" and "cool". https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=CBG Here's a video.


2

Neither of these are portmanteaux. To form a new word, a portmanteaux has to use parts of at least two words, more than their initial letters but less than the complete words (although it can use one of the words completely, but not all of them). If you can imagine a scale (with "0' on the left and "10" on the right), portmanteaux are in the middle range, ...


2

N.B. is a Latin abbreviation that usually appears in a footnote as added information that is not necessary in the text, but provides additional information for the reader. Therefore, if the "English speakers" you have encountered have not learned how to write papers with footnotes, they are unlikely to be familiar with this abbreviation. In working with ...


1

I believe better choices are: SEA, by its Spanish acronym SEA, its acronym in Spanish


1

'Call letters' are the string of 4 letters radio (and broadcast TV) stations in the US are assigned as an identifier - WCCO, KQRS, etc. 'Gag call letters' are simply joke versions. The joke in the examples given is that they (roughly) spell insults or curse words - the sort of joke a 12 year old might come up with. 'WDOPE' - 'Dope', 'KUNT' - 'cunt'. I have ...


1

Dictionaries should usually include a usage guide that explains what things like N-PLURAL mean, but yes, your guess is basically correct. Trousers is one of the nouns in English that can really only be used in a plural form: He wore trousers Never He wore a trouser There are a few words like this: trousers, pants, scissors, clothes, glasses (but ...


1

I'm trying to give you a possible answer based on a 10 minute study on commonly used acronyms. There is no formal rule as such. But based on my personal observations, some acronyms can be read out as if they were actual words. This is usually for acronyms which doesn't sound funny when spoken. An acronym with a vowel, at some position, has a higher chance of ...


1

According to Wikipedia (highlighting by me): An acronym is an abbreviation, used as a word, which is formed from the initial components in a phrase or a word. Usually these components are individual letters (as in NATO or laser) or parts of words or names (as in Benelux). There are broad currents of consensus but no universal standardization of various ...


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