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From Merriam Webster: Definition of ship (Entry 2 of 3) transitive verb [...] intransitive verb 1: to embark on a ship 2a: to go or travel by ship —often used with out b: to proceed by ship or other means under military orders —often used with out 3: to engage to serve on shipboard 4: to be sent for delivery the order will ship soon


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First of all, it is not an error to use the passive voice. Many books on style discourage overuse of the passive, but there is nothing erroneous about it. There are some cases where the passive voice is superior to the active voice (particularly in complex sentences.) Second, there are particular situations where the passive voice is less useful than the ...


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I am not sure what the second sentence means. Perhaps it's "You need a book grant to purchase one" or "You need special permission to use your grant for this book". Your best solution is to rewrite the second sentence. Use active or passive voice, but be clear.


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The original sentence sounds fine to me. Your suggestions keep the passive voice. The second suggestion also alters the original meaning. When you say "There must be a sanctioned book grant" you are saying that you are sure there already is a book grant in place. If you must get rid of the passive voice then you can rephrase it as "These books ...


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Here are two sentences that might help make the difference clear. Is the pharmacy open at 9 am? Yes, it opens at 7 am. Does the pharmacy open at 9 am? No, it opens at 7 am. "Does" in a sentence refers to the act of opening, so just the exact time of opening; "Is" in a sentence refers to the state of being open.


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Based on your name, I assume that your mother tongue is Spanish, so I want to give translations of the two sentences: "When is the pharmacy open?" = "¿Cuándo está la farmacia abierta?" ("open" is an adjective) "When does the pharmacy open?" = "¿Cuándo abre la farmacia?" ("open" is a verb)


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Confusion around use of ‘is’ versus ‘does’ is exceedingly common among people learning English as a second language, as it’s a distinction that a large number of other languages make through context (either by usage of specific forms for other words in the sentence, or by choice of words in the sentence). The difference, once you know it, is actually pretty ...


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Why can't I write this: "What time IS the pharmacy open?" You most certainly can. In this case, "is" is a state of being: the pharmacy is in the state of openness between 8AM to 9PM. "When does the pharmacy open?" That also works, because the pharmacy is "doing" (where "do" is the root of "does" ...


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