23

The words Christian and religious both can be either adjectives or nouns. Both of your sentences make sense if you add in the indefinite article, but they mean different things (and the second one uses somewhat specialized terminology). Using Christian as a noun and religious as an adjective: He's a religious Christian. This means that he is a ...


19

While I don't dispute Canadian Yankee's excellent answer, if you specifically wanted to know which order these should go in if you want to use them both as adjectives, then the answer is, it depends on what you want to emphasize. The more common order would be this: He's a religious Christian man. That means he's a Christian man who is very devout. ...


9

Honestly, neither of these sounds like proper English so I'm not sure if it's best to answer the question itself (the order of adjectives) or help rephrase the sentence. We would tend to say, in English, for what you describe, simply "He's a devout Christian" with one adejctive and one noun. To address the original question, English has a fairly strict set ...


9

While the other answers are good for your specific sentence, in general, in English we don't say [noun] is [adjective] [adjective] . we say [noun] is [adjective] and [adjective]. So it would be grammatical to say "He is religious and Christian." or "He is Christian and religious." but neither "He is religious Christian" or "He is Christian religious" ...


7

It's worth copying in a line quoted by the top answer when this was asked about on ELU... "Unfortunately, the rules for adjective order are very complicated, and different grammars disagree about the details". I'd also have to say that "opinion" is a very slippery (not to say subjective) word category. If beautiful is an "opinion" word then the same must ...


7

The easiest way for a native speaker to distinguish between a descriptive and classifier adjective is to attempt to intensify it. Consider the following: The old train The very old train The steam train *The very steam train While you can intensify descriptive adjectives (the very old train), you can't do it to classifiers, at least without some kind of ...


6

The 'standard' order of adjectives is the Royal order of adjectives, memorised as DOSSACOM Q. This is standard across all varieties of English, and even non-English languages that allow prenominal adjectives. Whether English users get it wrong is more difficult to answer. Underlying the royal order of adjectives is another ordering of determiner > ...


6

The grammatically correct one is I want two other methods. This implies that the two other methods, combined with the original method, are not the only appropriate methods. The asker is thinking that the methods you already told him/her about aren't adequate enough, and wants two more methods. "other" should have some modifier or quantifier or ...


5

Other posters have talked about the order of cumulative adjectives, but I don't think that really applies when the adjectives are the complement of the copula. A copula can't take cumulative adjectives: "It's a red coat" ✅ "The coat is red" ✅ "It's an amazing red coat" ✅ "The coat is amazing red" ❌ "The red coat is amazing" ✅ So while you can say "The ...


5

Instinctively, "Old-fashioned leather gloves" sounds correct to me as a native BrEng speaker. And I would agree that "old-fashioned" is an opinion rather than a "type", because they certainly were not "old-fashioned" when they were made so that cannot really describe the style. It is a matter of opinion that they are no longer in-style and therefore old-...


4

In general, in English, adjectives come before the noun that they modify, so version (2) doesn't work: you placed the noun somewhere in the middle. The other two are basically fine, but there are some guidelines for the order of adjectives when you have more than one, for instance this from the British Council: Adjectives usually come in this order: 1. ...


3

The phrase in question appears in this sentence:  I often think about a big ideal house in the suburbs I would live in without noisy neighbors to disturb me.  The word "ideal" has more than one sense.  In this context, "ideal" seems to mean something closer to "imaginary" than "optimal".  If so, it represents a material or a ...


3

There's a standard order, I guess (just search "English adjective order" for examples): What the adjective expresses Examples ------------------------------- ------------------------------ Quantity four, ten, a few, several Value/Opinion delicious, charming, beautiful Size tall, tiny, ...


3

Short Answer Both in American and British corpus, there are entries for this order - strong healthy, and no entry for the reverse order of these two words. The correct order is - strong healthy. Long Answer Grammatical Explanation :- Adjectives occur in noun phrase. Within noun phrase, the correct position of adjective is between the determiner and ...


3

silly fat cats (or) fat silly cats Silly fat cats is more euphonious. Both are grammatically correct. 'Fat cats' idiomatically means rich people, or rich powerful people. So it could be that you are calling those rich people silly, as opposed to calling those silly cats plump. funny fat cats (or) fat funny cats The rhythm of these phrases is about ...


3

The structure in the sentence below is described as have + an object + present participle in grammar books. The book has two pages missing. The lady has several people waiting. The children had many packages floating throught their imaginations. The pattern also applies to get: To get the kettle boiling. Whereas: |The book has two missing pages| shows ...


3

According to the rules of adjective order at Ginger, quality (useless) comes before color (yellow), but how seriously this is supposed to be taken, I can only guess!


3

I suspect that most native English speakers would choose your first option. But if you were engaged in a conversation with someone about this person's hair in which the other speaker said: I was told that she had short, curly red hair. You might well reply: No, she has shoulder-length, curly red hair. because it's the length of her hair that's of ...


3

The most usual order of adjectives is this: 1 a general opinion: exquisite, terrible 1 b specific opinion: friendly, dusty 2 size: big, small, tall 3 physical quality: thin, rough, untidy 4 shape: round, square, rectangular 5 age: young, old, youthful 6 colour: blue, red, pink 7 origin: Dutch, Japanese, Turkish 8 material: metal, wood, plastic 9 type: ...


3

If you are asking about the order of adjectives, I would use a more neutral example, such as "this is a beautiful, well-made cake" vs. "this is a well-made, beautiful cake." Either one works, depending on what you are trying to emphasize. It would be odd for someone to describe a person as either a "cute good girl" or "good cute girl" because the phrase "...


3

Only all her kindness is grammatical: you can think of it as an abbreviation of all of her kindness if that helps. In a similar way, with a count noun, you can have: none of her friends, some of her friends, most of her friends, and all (of) her friends.


3

long, black, leather is correct. Adjectives are always in the following order: opinion, size, age, shape, color, origin, material, purpose. No one really knows WHY we do it this way. Most people don't even realize they're doing it and if you asked them if there was a rule, they'd say "no". I don't think it's even technically a "rule". But ...


3

These particular words are tricky because "fat cat" (both words stressed) is an idiom referring to a prominent wealthy person, and because "old" can be used colloquially as an intensifier after an adjective: We had a great old time yesterday! (stress on GREAT; a folksy way to say we had a really great time) To refer to a feline that is ...


2

Determining this order of adjectives is not always easy. Try different orders and see which one makes sense: In your first phrase, both orders are actually possible: an old political idea a political old idea There is, however, a difference in meaning. In the first one, you're comparing it to other political ideas and describing this one as ...


2

The problem that I've studied in my work has a global solution that is exponentially stable Given that explanation, #3 is an idiomatic expression of the idea you wish to convey: The existence of an exponentially stable global solution will be investigated. However, I don't much care for "The existence ... will be investigated" when we can say it more ...


2

"global solution exponentially stable" is not grammatically correct. It has the form <adjective> <noun> <adjective phrase>. Both "global exponentially stable solution" and "exponentially stable global solution" seem grammatically correct. They both have the form <adjective (phrase)> <adjective (...


2

The phrase"ninety-story" is a noun phrase. More importantly, it is a measure phrase. We often use measure phrases like this to modify adjectives. The measure phrase always comes before the adjective. Usually, the measure phrase is made from a number and a unit of measurement (a noun). The unit of measurement often measures time or space, but it could be ...


2

The correct one is ninety-story tall. Tall is an adjective that modifies building. Ninety-story is an adverb that modifies tall. Ninety-tall story doesn't make sense because you are selecting modifiers that qualify how tall the building is, not how tall any story is. Story also is not typically an adjective so it is confusing for that reason too. Ninety-...


2

I think most people would say "naughty little kid". "jagged wide scar" would be correct if the scar itself is wide and it is jagged. If the jags themselves are spreading all over the place, it would be a "widely jagged scar". If you want to use these words.


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