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44 votes

Why does "new" go before "huge" in: “New huge Japanese company”?

Without a special context, "huge new Japanese company" is correct, and the version you present is incorrect. This phrase should follow the normal adjective order rules as you describe them. ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
28 votes

Loud heavy/heavy loud metal band

The term "Heavy metal" is the name of a specific genre of music. See the Wikipedia article. A "heavy metal band" is a band that plays such music exclusively or primarily. A "...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
23 votes

He's "religious Christian" or "Christian religious"?

The words Christian and religious both can be either adjectives or nouns. Both of your sentences make sense if you add in the indefinite article, but they mean different things (and the second one ...
Canadian Yankee's user avatar
19 votes

He's "religious Christian" or "Christian religious"?

While I don't dispute Canadian Yankee's excellent answer, if you specifically wanted to know which order these should go in if you want to use them both as adjectives, then the answer is, it depends ...
joiedevivre's user avatar
  • 4,660
9 votes

He's "religious Christian" or "Christian religious"?

Honestly, neither of these sounds like proper English so I'm not sure if it's best to answer the question itself (the order of adjectives) or help rephrase the sentence. We would tend to say, in ...
pickarooney's user avatar
9 votes

He's "religious Christian" or "Christian religious"?

While the other answers are good for your specific sentence, in general, in English we don't say [noun] is [adjective] [adjective] . we say [noun] is [adjective] and [adjective]. So it would be ...
MMAdams's user avatar
  • 396
9 votes

Why does "new" go before "huge" in: “New huge Japanese company”?

Most likely because ‘huge Japanese company’ is the noun phrase being modified by ‘new’, not ‘company’ or ‘Japanese company’. English is generally exceedingly strict about ordering of categories of ...
Austin Hemmelgarn's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

The order of adjectives: Is it exactly the same in GB, the USA, and elsewhere in the English-speaking world?

The 'standard' order of adjectives is the Royal order of adjectives, memorised as DOSSACOM Q. This is standard across all varieties of English, and even non-English languages that allow prenominal ...
Roaring Fish's user avatar
  • 1,453
5 votes

Word Order: "the village crazy lady" vs. "the crazy village lady"

crazy lady in this instance is treated as a set phrase - a crazy lady is a slang expression for (at best) a woman who is somewhat eccentric, to someone who might have considerable mental issues. It's ...
mike's user avatar
  • 9,863
5 votes

He's "religious Christian" or "Christian religious"?

Other posters have talked about the order of cumulative adjectives, but I don't think that really applies when the adjectives are the complement of the copula. A copula can't take cumulative ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Adjectives order (old-fashioned)

Instinctively, "Old-fashioned leather gloves" sounds correct to me as a native BrEng speaker. And I would agree that "old-fashioned" is an opinion rather than a "type", because they certainly were not ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
4 votes

Asking for grammatical explanations for why "The book has two pages missing." is right

The structure in the sentence below is described as have + an object + present participle in grammar books. The book has two pages missing. The lady has several people waiting. The children had many ...
Lambie's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

What does "phantom central" mean?

Here, "central" refers to a telephone switchboard or something like it, essentially a central location where communications are routed from. "Phantom" is used as an adjective to ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Does use of superlative adjective affect the order of adjectives?

If one of the adjectives is a superlative, by definition this implies there are others of the same general type. So the youngest small man implies there are other small men who aren't so young, and ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"yellow useless part" or "useless yellow part"?

According to the rules of adjective order at Ginger, quality (useless) comes before color (yellow), but how seriously this is supposed to be taken, I can only guess!
JMP's user avatar
  • 1,256
3 votes

Order of adjectives "a big ideal house" or "an ideal big house"

The phrase in question appears in this sentence:  I often think about a big ideal house in the suburbs I would live in without noisy neighbors to disturb me.  The word "ideal" has ...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar
3 votes

Which order of adjectives is correct?

There's a standard order, I guess (just search "English adjective order" for examples): What the adjective expresses Examples ------------------------------- ------------------------------ ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.9k
3 votes

Order of adjectives for hair

I suspect that most native English speakers would choose your first option. But if you were engaged in a conversation with someone about this person's hair in which the other speaker said: I was ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
  • 25.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Is the adjective order "sunny, secret, green" correct?

The most usual order of adjectives is this: 1 a general opinion: exquisite, terrible 1 b specific opinion: friendly, dusty 2 size: big, small, tall 3 physical quality: thin, rough, untidy 4 shape: ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
3 votes

"good cute girl" vs. "cute good girl": adjective order when they're of the same kind

If you are asking about the order of adjectives, I would use a more neutral example, such as "this is a beautiful, well-made cake" vs. "this is a well-made, beautiful cake." Either one works, ...
SarahT's user avatar
  • 2,462
3 votes

Order of consecutive determinatives

Only all her kindness is grammatical: you can think of it as an abbreviation of all of her kindness if that helps. In a similar way, with a count noun, you can have: none of her friends, some of her ...
Timmy's user avatar
  • 37
3 votes
Accepted

Last year, Joanna bought two ... coats in New York

long, black, leather is correct. Adjectives are always in the following order: opinion, size, age, shape, color, origin, material, purpose. No one really knows WHY we do it this way. Most people don't ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 8,034
3 votes

Which is grammatically correct? "a fat old cat" or "an old fat cat"

These particular words are tricky because "fat cat" (both words stressed) is an idiom referring to a prominent wealthy person, and because "old" can be used colloquially as an ...
nschneid's user avatar
  • 5,137
3 votes

why does expensive goes before professional?

'Expensive' is an opinion. What is expensive to one person is not necessarily to another. It is related to perceived value. Adjectives of opinion always go first. A popular guide to order of ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
2 votes
Accepted

Is there an order for two continuous adjectives?

The British Council for English states We usually put a general opinion in front of a specific opinion: Nice tasty soup. A nasty uncomfortable armchair A lovely intelligent animal ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 1,663
2 votes

Is there an order for two continuous adjectives?

Scottish warm house assumes that there is something called a "warm house" and it is Scottish whereas Scottish hot house would be a "hot house" in Scotland, "hot house" is a specific term. ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
2 votes

Word Order: "the village crazy lady" vs. "the crazy village lady"

Continuing Mike's answer, and referring to JK2's comment, normally there is only one village "crazy lady", in the same way that there is only one village policeman or mayor (obviously a village doesn'...
No'am Newman's user avatar
2 votes

Order of adjectives "a big ideal house" or "an ideal big house"

Your 'thought' matches that of Cambridge Dictionary's entry on the order of the adjectives. In other words, that sentence could be written better as '..an ideal big house...' Nevertheless, you may ...
Maulik V's user avatar
  • 66.1k
2 votes

position of adjective when the noun is followed by preposition

The second sentence makes more sense, because 'suitable' pertains to 'post', which is why they should sit closest to each other in the sentence. What is a 'suitable man' is really the question? ...
Insider_English's user avatar

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