26 votes
Accepted

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

The other answers do an excellent job explaining too adjective to infinitive, so I won't address that. I'll try to explain a different aspect of this, which might be what you're finding so surprising: ...
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23 votes
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Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

Some English speakers feel that '100 per cent' is overused as an expression, especially in connection with things that cannot be measured. For example, you couldn't say a pronunciation was '87% ...
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20 votes

Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

Understandable? Yes. Almost all English natives would understand your intended meaning. Correct? I'd say so. Some might argue that it should be an adverb like "fully", but if it's correct ...
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17 votes
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Can we use "much more superior"?

Don't say: My game is *much more superior to yours. But say: My game is far superior to yours. This is because superior is a non-gradable adjective. Non-gradable adjectives can't be used ...
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  • 26.8k
13 votes

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

The construction in question is: too adjective to verb Examples: I'm too tired to drive I'm too bored to continue I'm too dizzy to stand The "too" here is crucial -- it's saying you're ...
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10 votes

Which sentence is grammatically incorrect?

This may be a regional thing (I'm from London) but I definitely find sentence 3 odd: This is a deep lake to swim As another answerer has already mentioned, I would generally expect to see: This ...
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  • 1,162
10 votes
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How to say if I want to select a few largest sizes of apples?

I actually wouldn't say "sizes of" at all, because we're not selecting sizes, we're selecting apples, and saying "sizes of" is redundant if we're already saying "largest". I would say The largest ...
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  • 35.9k
10 votes

Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

‘100% correct’ is grammatically correct in this context, though the organization of the sentence is a bit atypical for many more formal dialects of English and may be difficult for some people to ...
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9 votes

Mary's house is near to/next to the hair salon.

Next to implies an immediate vicinity; whereas near to implies "a short distance away." In this way, you can have a next-door neighbour, who lives next to you, but your bank, a short drive away, ...
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8 votes

Which sentence is grammatically incorrect?

All five sentences are grammatically correct. Sentences #3 and #4 are the trickiest. These two sentences are perfectly idiomatic: . 2. Do you have something to eat? . 5. She lived to be ninety. ...
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8 votes
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What is the difference between first hand and hands-on?

"Hands on" means there is/was a physical interaction. You might have hands-on experience baking cookies, for example. First hand means "directly." For example, a person who directly worked with drug ...
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  • 1,987
7 votes

Mary's house is near to/next to the hair salon.

Most (not all) native speakers say near {some thing or some place} rather than near to {some thing or some place}. And we say next to {some place} never next {some place} She left her umbrella ...
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6 votes

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

I am tired to drive. (wrong) The sentence is wrong because there is no such construction in English. Or, rather, a similar construction exists but it serves as a kind of a passive construction: ...
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5 votes

There is a little water in the pot. There is some water in the pot

"A little" has greater emphasis on there being a small amount than "some." In that sense, "a little" is less than "some." For example, someone who leaves a pot on the stove for far too long and ...
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  • 1,749
5 votes
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It was the most helpless I have ever felt in my life - what does "the most helpless" mean?

It is the superlative form of helpless: I feel helpless today. I feel more helpless than I did yesterday. However, I felt the most helpless last week. In fact, last week was the most helpless I've ...
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  • 6,639
5 votes

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

The phrase "too tired to drive" is an instance of the general construction "too <adjective> to <verb>", which is used to indicate that the person or thing being described cannot (or will ...
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5 votes

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

This is grammatical: I'm too tired to drive. but this isn't: I'm tired to drive. Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical? Your example #1 means that it is expected that you ...
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  • 4,920
5 votes
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How should I understand "of the 8th"?

The sentence is saying that the Greek Archaic period lasted from the 8th century BC to the 6th century BC, and that Ancient Greece existed from the Archaic period to the end of the antiquity, which ...
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  • 206
5 votes
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How does this "varying with age..." phrase relate to the rest of the sentence?

the precise number of layers varying with age and the nature of the forest This is a new clause, equivalent to The precise number of layers varies with age and the nature of the forest, but by ...
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5 votes

"Your clothes are small size" --- Is this grammatical?

Both of the original poster's suggested corrections are grammatically and semantically correct. #2 ("small in size") is an idiomatic expression, but is not usually used to describe clothes. #1 is ...
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5 votes
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The meaning of "late" in "the late Buddy Holly"

"The late" in these cases does not refer to his occupation -- unless, of course, you consider "no longer being alive" an occupation. "The late Buddy Holly" means "...
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  • 1,379
4 votes

How can I figure out whether a word is an adverb or an adjective?

Phrase-oriented grammar There is no simple rule. But here is the key: in English, you must learn to recognize phrases, not just individual words. In English, phrases are often indivisible units of ...
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  • 27.4k
4 votes

what is the function of "a foot" in this sentence?

It is a noun that is part a premodifier in the following phrase: only a foot or so high The above phrase in its entirety is the complement to the subject. The phrase only a foot or so is a ...
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  • 5,074
4 votes
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Adjectives to describe rectangular and round objects?

for rectangular objects - box shaped for round shapes for aerodynamic efficiency and nice appearance - streamlined
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  • 30.9k
4 votes
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Which sentence is grammatically incorrect?

The answer key is not correct in terms of grammaticality, but unfortunately more context is needed. "Swim" can be used transitively to mean that you are traversing/going a certain distance in ...
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4 votes

Usage of "at its zenith"

Apotheosize can simply mean to glorify, to idolize, so not necessarily to raise (higher than something's highest height). Oxford Dictionaries Dictionary.com
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  • 9,889
4 votes
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Can a blunder be egregious?

Actually, Cambridge (that you linked to) looks like the only one to emphasize the mistake as big or serious in the definition. Oxford Merriam-Webster Collins Dictionary.com These all agree that a ...
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4 votes
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What's in a name?... Wait, or is there?

In the phrase adjective clause, "adjective" is not an adjective: it fails most of the tests for adjectives. It is a noun modifying another noun: a very common structure in English. In this ...
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  • 65.1k
3 votes
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What is the adjective for "problem solving"?

With the addition of a dash, problem-solving can be used adjectivally before a noun. In fact, a lot of similar adjectivals can be formed with the active participle ending in -ing: habit-forming, all-...
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  • 6,639
3 votes

Does healthy or strong go first when used together?

Short Answer Both in American and British corpus, there are entries for this order - strong healthy, and no entry for the reverse order of these two words. The correct order is - strong healthy. ...
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