37

Generally, when units of measure are used as adjectives, or as part of a compound noun, they are singular. When expressed as simple nouns, they are plural. Thus, A ten-year-old boy is sitting on the couch. The boy sitting on the couch is ten years old. The boy sitting on the couch is a ten-year-old. As for the hyphenation, exact usage is a matter of style, ...


26

The other answers do an excellent job explaining too adjective to infinitive, so I won't address that. I'll try to explain a different aspect of this, which might be what you're finding so surprising: specifically, how it could possibly be that removing an adverb could render a sentence ungrammatical? As you said, removing "slowly" from "He ...


26

They're attributive nouns. Here, release is an attributive noun. It modifies the head noun directly following it: release date Together they form the nominal release date, meaning "the date of [something]'s release". Add an article to that, and we get a complete noun phrase: [ The release date ]noun phrase had yet to be determined. Your example, ...


18

Yes, it is. Here's why: Nouns can sometimes be used like adjectives. From Wikipedia Noun adjuncts are nouns that modify other nouns. (e.g. language learners, man eater, work clothes, chicken soup, etc.) How does this work for three nouns? (Iphone + release + date) They work for as many nouns as you like.† (e.g. baseball game ticket price ...


17

Don't say: My game is *much more superior to yours. But say: My game is far superior to yours. This is because superior is a non-gradable adjective. Non-gradable adjectives can't be used comparatively or superlatively. (In other words, you can't say or write more superior or most superior in comparison sentences.) Most grammar books would cover gradable ...


14

The construction in question is: too adjective to verb Examples: I'm too tired to drive I'm too bored to continue I'm too dizzy to stand The "too" here is crucial -- it's saying you're tired to such an extent that you cannot drive. Contrast this with: almost too tired to drive In this case, you're still indicating that you're tired, but not ...


12

As J.R. says, that construction is grammatical, and indeed required. A bare adjective, or one modified by one or more preceding adverbs, goes in front of the noun. (I'm adding a determiner, many, to your sentence, to make the structure a little less ambiguous.) Many angry people were protesting. Many passionately and vociferously angry people were ...


10

This may be a regional thing (I'm from London) but I definitely find sentence 3 odd: This is a deep lake to swim As another answerer has already mentioned, I would generally expect to see: This is a deep lake to swim in. And I confess I was quite surprised to see how many people found the original sentence natural. It is certainly true that you can ...


10

I actually wouldn't say "sizes of" at all, because we're not selecting sizes, we're selecting apples, and saying "sizes of" is redundant if we're already saying "largest". I would say The largest few apples are selected or A few of the largest apples are selected (For reference, I would say "largest sizes of" only if I were explicitly referring to ...


9

X year old is a phrase that can be either an adjective, noun or a construct of the verb to be When used as an adjective the correct thing to say is year old. A ten-year-old boy is sitting on the couch. When used as a verb construct it must agree with the noun in terms of quantity. The boy is sitting on the couch is 10 years old. You want to use it ...


9

Next to implies an immediate vicinity; whereas near to implies "a short distance away." In this way, you can have a next-door neighbour, who lives next to you, but your bank, a short drive away, could be near to your house. The key to the answer, I think, is the question, "Do you think you can find it?" This would imply that it's easily found by simply ...


8

All five sentences are grammatically correct. Sentences #3 and #4 are the trickiest. These two sentences are perfectly idiomatic: . 2. Do you have something to eat? . 5. She lived to be ninety. Sentence 5 implies that "she" is dead. "She's ninety" or "She has lived to be ninety" or "She's looking forward to her ninety-...


8

"Hands on" means there is/was a physical interaction. You might have hands-on experience baking cookies, for example. First hand means "directly." For example, a person who directly worked with drug using students as opposed to someone who read a report the first person wrote about their experience. The person who read the report would be said to have "...


7

I am tired to drive. (wrong) The sentence is wrong because there is no such construction in English. Or, rather, a similar construction exists but it serves as a kind of a passive construction: Compare: I am easy to please. Here, you say that it is easy to please you. That someone will find it easy to please you. Try to insert tired, and the ...


7

I think your confusion comes from the use of the word "of". The word "of" in English can be used when speaking about a part of something. Like "the door OF my house", "the arm OF the chair". But it can also be used when speaking of a characteristic or attribute of something. "The height OF my brother", "the speed OF my car". When we want to talk about the ...


7

Most (not all) native speakers say near {some thing or some place} rather than near to {some thing or some place}. And we say next to {some place} never next {some place} She left her umbrella near the door. The hair salon is next to the bookstore. In your test question, there is a confusing and misleading clue: Do you think you can find it? If ...


6

The term "battle royal" is an unusual construction because it uses the French custom of putting the adjective after the noun (source). As the word "battle" is the noun of the phrase, it takes the plural form. Adjectives do not have plural forms, so it does not make sense to say "battle royals".


6

Here's the relevant "usage note" from dictionary.com, as cited in an answer to a similar question on ELU. Of is sometimes added to phrases beginning with the adverb how or too followed by a descriptive adjective: How long of a drive will it be? It's too hot of a day for tennis. This construction is probably modeled on that in which how or too is ...


6

The phrase "too tired to drive" is an instance of the general construction "too <adjective> to <verb>", which is used to indicate that the person or thing being described cannot (or will not) perform the action <verb> (or cannot be the object of it) because it is excessively <adjective>. Some other examples of the same construction ...


6

This is grammatical: I'm too tired to drive. but this isn't: I'm tired to drive. Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical? Your example #1 means that it is expected that you will not drive. And that the reason why it is expected that you won't drive is that you are too tired. Thus, your example #1: I'm too tired to drive. -- (OP's #...


5

The sentence is saying that the Greek Archaic period lasted from the 8th century BC to the 6th century BC, and that Ancient Greece existed from the Archaic period to the end of the antiquity, which was around 600 AD (ca. stands for "circa", which is a Latin word that is used in English to mean "approximately"). The sentence can be broken down like this: ...


5

It is the superlative form of helpless: I feel helpless today. I feel more helpless than I did yesterday. However, I felt the most helpless last week. In fact, last week was the most helpless I've ever felt in my life.


5

"A little" has greater emphasis on there being a small amount than "some." In that sense, "a little" is less than "some." For example, someone who leaves a pot on the stove for far too long and comes back might say "there is a little water in the pot" to express greater relief at a near miss of a much more dangerous situation, than "there is some water in ...


5

the precise number of layers varying with age and the nature of the forest This is a new clause, equivalent to The precise number of layers varies with age and the nature of the forest, but by casting its verb, vary, as a gerund-participle, varying, we make it incapable of standing by itself as an independent clause so that we can use it as a dependent ...


5

Both of the original poster's suggested corrections are grammatically and semantically correct. #2 ("small in size") is an idiomatic expression, but is not usually used to describe clothes. #1 is not an idiomatic expression. The following options are natural in American English: 3) Your clothes are size "Small". 4) Your clothes are all Smalls. ...


5

"The late" in these cases does not refer to his occupation -- unless, of course, you consider "no longer being alive" an occupation. "The late Buddy Holly" means "Buddy Holly (who is dead)", only phrased in a more respectful way.


4

I guess iPhone release date serves as a compound noun. In that case, it does not take anything. You may read it like this... [iphone release date] and [price] unveiled [Just to address your confusion about the device being released by itself -- Even if I believe it for a while that 'iphone' is the one releasing itself, it takes 'releases', doesn't it! - ...


4

Phrase-oriented grammar There is no simple rule. But here is the key: in English, you must learn to recognize phrases, not just individual words. In English, phrases are often indivisible units of grammar. In your example, "bright red" is an adjectival phrase. The two words together function as a single adjective. You think of them as one unit: She wore ...


4

It is a noun that is part a premodifier in the following phrase: only a foot or so high The above phrase in its entirety is the complement to the subject. The phrase only a foot or so is a premodifier for high.


4

for rectangular objects - box shaped for round shapes for aerodynamic efficiency and nice appearance - streamlined


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