5

In your example, "white" is a noun. Colours can be adjectives or nouns. Example as an adjective: She was dressed in a brilliant white dress. Saying "she was dressed in white" is like saying "she was dressed in cotton" or "...in silk".


4

When someone asks "are you fine" today? How are you? Are you alright? Are you okay? they want information about your particular status that day. Perhaps you look tired, or you were recently ill. Your answer (should you choose to respond) addresses that state. Neither the question nor the answer has anything to do with what kind of person you are.


4

A writing table is a table for the purpose of writing on, not a table that is in the act of writing. Writing here is a gerund used as an adjective. https://medium.com/@engtuto1/can-gerunds-be-also-used-as-adjectives-89e5698411f3


2

Here is your closure. Separate is one of the most commonly misspelled words in the English language. Separate can be an adjective, 'set apart, distinct, or not related', and a verb, 'to set apart, to distinguish, or to divide'. Separate is often misspelled as 'seperate', a word that has no meaning and is simply a misspelling. Separate vs seperate ...


2

The classic model of English I grew up with divided everything into 8 parts of speech: Nouns (things, places, objects) Pronouns (take the place of a noun) Verbs (actions) Adjectives (modify nouns) Adverbs (modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs) Conjunctions (connect constituents, phrases, or clauses) Prepositions (placed before a noun and express ...


2

The text you read is incorrect and misleading. When used as an article, the word the is never an adjective (nor an adverb either). It is simply an article, full stop. That is its part of speech. It does not describe a noun. It determines a noun. In the case of a noun phrase involving an adjective in the superlative degree, that leading the is unaltered in ...


2

I imagine the root of your problem here is the use of "times". In English, "times" can be synonymous with the mathematical operation multiplication. For example: 2 multiplied by 2 equals 4. 2 times 2 is 4. Both of these mean the same. The latter is a more simplified way of expressing a mathematical equation. Children (in the UK, at ...


2

Neither texts are valid English utterances. However, they can be slightly modified to make more sense. I read the reports twice more than you. Could be "I read the reports twice as many times as you do/did." Depending on whether read is past tense, or present tense, it would be "did" or "do". And it means there are exactly X ...


2

The example from the question: Beef is tastier as opposed to game meat. is not something that a fluent speaker would say or write. The most obvious way to express what I take to be the meaning would be: Beef is tastier than game meat. That is a straightforward comparison, and is grammatically valid and quite natural. The phrase "as opposed to" ...


1

This is my writing table. I bought a writing table. "Writing" is best classified as a verb phrase functioning as an attributive modifier. It's clearly not a noun, and it fails the usual tests for adjectivehood. For example, it can't be modified by "very". And it can't occur as complement to complex-intransitive verbs like "become&...


1

The sentences are grammatically correct, but "It is likely for you..." is rather verbose, and is generally only used to express an indirect consequence of an action, for example creating an environment where something might happen. If you visit a rough area of town, it is likely that you will be mugged. - indirect consequence If you insult the ...


1

I believe your confusion arises from the fact that there are several different words written "married". There is an intransitive verb "John married" or "John and Jane married". "Married" is the past tense of "marry". There is a verb, in which the subject and object are the husband and wife, or the wife and ...


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