9

I would use "a book of the student's choice". Of X's choice (often of your choice, but equally valid as of my choice, of her choice, of the President's choice, etc.) is an idiom that means "that X chooses from all of the available options". This implies that the student can choose any book, but unlike optional, means that the choice ...


4

In your sentence the noun compliance is not an adjective, but an attributive noun. M-W explains: Attributive here means "joined directly to a noun in order to describe it". There are a few differences between attributive nouns and adjectives, among which the most important, according to M-W, are: An attributive noun can only modify a noun when ...


3

"Happy to accept" is the idiomatic use. In the sense of "content or satisfied" the usage is either ... happy to (do something) ... happy with (something) The first three use this pattern. But there is no need to use a continuous or perfect form. The perfect would suggest that you were satisfied with the consequences of acceptance; ...


2

In your example you are abstracting your telescope to include properties of the telescope. Which is fine for most situations. Your first sentence sounds fine and will be understood in most situations. Saying your telescope is more precise, however, leaves your statement open to interpretation. Is it more precise in that you have more control over its ...


2

If you want want to achieve that task, you should do something more manual. This is correct. Manually turns manual into an adverb - which doesn't work. However, the word manual when used like this might have a strong connotation of "blue-collar labor" - working on cars, building houses, literally getting your hands dirty, etc. An option is to use ...


1

"Inferior" is not a the comparative degree (in English, it is the comparative degree in Latin) However it's meaning is relative. It means "lower down" or (in this context) "less good". So you don't need to form "more inferior". And this usage quirk is what the question is trying to get at: You don't tend to form the ...


1

I am trying to emphasis the greatness of consequences. Then I suggest you use this instead: serious consequences If you had to use catastrophic, you could juse use catastrophic consequences If you really had to emphasize catastrophic, you might add truly: truly catastrophic consequences


1

Yes, the phrase is redundant. They both mean something like "large and terrible." Of the two, "catastrophic" is the more informative, so I recommend using that on its own. Whatever subtle distinction is added by "tremendous" is not worth the added burden of reading it. In common usage, "tremendous" is also ambiguous: ...


1

You can split before the word "of". So, "of hot milk" is a prepositional phrase, which modifies "a glass" to form a noun phrase "a glass of hot milk" "a" is an article, and "glass" is a noun.


1

"Red" here is a predicate adjective. It modifies "face" by means of the linking verb "turn." "Bright" can be used as a predicate adjective. It works that way in each of the following: The lamp is bright. The sun is hot and bright. In #2, "hot" and "bright" are distinct qualities of "the sun.&...


1

Actually what you ask in your question is different from what you ask in the title. The answer to the title might include "selectable", but of course this word cannot be used the way you want, because what you want is not an adjective for "able to be chosen" but rather for "that is to be chosen". One option (already given by ...


1

None of your suggestions work very well to my ears as you are describing the telescope when what you really want to do is to describe the operation of the telescope. I would suggest This new telescope gives a much sharper image This new telescope gives a much clearer image


1

Sure. "Margin of error" is a noun phrase. If you want to characterize it with the adjectives "damnable" or "trivial" or "catastrophic", you can do that.


1

As computer game technology has increased, graphics have become higher in resolution. Terms like 'chunky' and 'blocky' have often been used to describe computer graphics using larger pixel sizes, either in comparison to contemporary graphics of the time, or by modern standards. Back in the 1980s, game designers often had to make a choice between a wide ...


1

The question here is the difference between very and too. See those examples so you can understand: That tree is very big She sings very beautifully But we use VERY/TOO MUCH before comparatives He is very much taller than his brother (positive idea) This is too much more expensive, I can't buy it (negative idea) Rest: VERY MUCH / TOO MUCH (+ noun) I ...


1

To complement the answers of FumbleFingers and apaderno (kiamlaluno), it's worth noting those instances when little is used to denote a personality trait. little/small dog In this example the adjectives “little” and “small” are interchangeable, they modify the noun dog. It means the dog is particularly small, unless it is said jokingly of a Great Dane or ...


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