3

When talking about someone's (or something's) future prospects, I would use promising. Promising means showing promise or potential. It is something an entity displays. Hopeful, on the other hand, more often means feeling hope; a company's leadership may be hopeful about the company's future. Of course, as you have discovered, "hopeful" can also be ...


1

These all mean basically the same thing -- some arbitrary months in the near future: "in coming months" "in the next few months" (this may suggest more immediacy than other options, but not necessarily) "in the upcoming months" (this is awkward and uncommon) This means next month: "next month" These are not valid: ...


1

Your example is unnatural. To use "whose" to describe what you have specified, you could say In my apartment building, there are twenty apartments several of whose people living there are friends of mine.


1

You can write a book on the various meanings of "get" The OED definition is about 30000 words long, if you include all the examples. These common verbs have many senses that are functional rather than meaningful. Still it is clear that here "right" is an adjective, and describes the answers. "Get" still means "receive&...


1

You can parse it as a participle modifying a noun, or as an adjective formed from a participle modifying a noun. It is very common for participles to be used as modifiers, in just the same way as adjectives. Some participles have certainly become adjectives: bored, broken, tired etc. Others, like "cancelled" only get used as adjectives in ...


1

B and D are natural English, although A and C are not. However, there are some exceptions that allow us to make sentences just as in your A and C examples. For example, if you have a relative clause modifying the noun "test" and it is long enough to keep "make" and "difficult" really far away from each other, then you can use A ...


1

No, it doesn't really work. "Good" is a very bland adjective that simply means something has other qualities on which you might judge it good. A "good meal" might be judged on taste and presentation, whereas a "good movie" would have very different metrics. So, while you can say something is "good", that just sums up ...


1

little things = not very important or serious, insignificant, trivial things (descriptive) little attention = a small amount of attention (quantitative) pay little attention to sth = not take it seriously


1

The word "unassisted" in both of your examples seems to be analogous to the word "young" as discussed in this question on Linguistics Stackexchange: Linguistics Stackexchange "predicative adjuncts..." "The adjectives in question do indeed behave in a unique way. They are dependents of the verb, but they are predications ...


1

They are both grammatically correct; they're using two different definitions of the adverb form. See https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/alone#Adverb Example "a" appears to be usage 2. Example "b" looks like usage 3.3. Whether they're correctly punctuated is a matter of opinion, I think, as it's your second sentence in each example that ...


1

None of this makes sense. And all of it makes sense. Geographical sense? We all live in this physical world. Land, oceans, planets, space, etc. It all makes sense. Evolutionary sense? Evolution makes sense to most people I think. If not, those people don't make sense. Artistic sense? In the eye of the beholder, but it makes sense to them. Legal sense? Not ...


1

All your examples make grammatical sense. What you have discovered is the malleability of English. Just about any adjective can be used to describe the adjectival sense of some action or idea.


1

No - "ahead" is an adverb and is always relative to something: One car is ahead of the other (compares the two positions) On the road ahead (compares to your relative position) In your context, referring to a vehicle that is ahead of another, you could say: The car in front. or, if the cars were competing in a race, you might say: The car in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible