3 votes
Accepted

compound adjectives with "-made"

No. "-made" denotes who/how something was made, not the material from which it was made. Hence a "man-made disaster" or "home-made bread". "Seaweed-based packaging&...
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  • 506
2 votes

using real instead of really

It's a very informal usage. Technically, really is an adverb and real is an adjective, but people do use real as an adverb sometimes. You should only use it in very informal contexts, like speaking ...
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  • 34.9k
2 votes

Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

There is a difference between the two usages you have identified: Much as is a normal, correct, not informal equivalent of 'even though'. The speaker in the video says 'Much as I think he's a knob, I ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Why isn't 'half' an adjective in this sentence?

You could consider "half" an adjective that modifies "spoon". However, be aware that a determiner is usually the first element in a noun phrase, so it is unusual to put "half&...
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1 vote
Accepted

Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

Seems fine to me, if a bit informal (which is expected for speech). Here are some other examples: Much as we might hate it, negative ads work. (Blog comment) Soon as the sun rises, we'll be ...
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  • 11.2k
1 vote

How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

Words which are nominally adverbs can also be used to modify adjectives as well as verbs, and in many cases can modify nouns, thus functioning as adjectives. many words in English are not rigidly ...
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  • 32.4k
1 vote

How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, but adverbs can also modify adjectives, other adverbs, or whole clauses. For example, loudly, slightly, and almost are all adverbs. Here are some examples of ...
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  • 1,663
1 vote

Should we use possession or can we consider nouns as adjectives?

In your example "document location", "document" is, as user Canadian Yankee said, an attributive noun. The two constructions you mention, attributive noun and possessive, are both ...
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  • 440

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