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In English, this type of construction is called a compound noun: it is used to describe a specific type of something. The final noun is the general thing, and any nouns in front of it (yes, there can be more than one) specify exactly what kind of thing it is. As an example, a can is a noun, an opener is a noun, and we can put these two nouns together to form ...


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In English it is possible to use a noun as an adjective Here is an internet article about this: As you know, a noun is a person, place or thing, and an adjective is a word that describes a noun ... Sometimes we use a noun to describe another noun. In that case, the first noun "acts as" an adjective ... The "noun as adjective" always ...


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I am not sure there is a word that will clearly convey what you want to say. Many of those words would technically work, since the "simplest" could potentially refer to the fraction that is already "fully simplified," and so on. If I were you, however, I would rephrase the question slightly to increase clarity. Ask something like: Which ...


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Only all her kindness is grammatical: you can think of it as an abbreviation of all of her kindness if that helps. In a similar way, with a count noun, you can have: none of her friends, some of her friends, most of her friends, and all (of) her friends.


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Yes, "known" is an adjective here and "unknown" is a noun. Known and unknown unknowns have been popularly discussed in this way since Donald Rumsfeld famously used the terms in 2002. Apparently these phrases existed before that, but they were not in popular use. Today, a great many English speakers are familiar with them, even if they don'...


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Verbs don't have "adjective forms". They do have participles, and some adjectives are formed from the participle form of verbs. Often there are multiple interpretations about whether something is an adjective or a participle. We have a couple of normal contexts for "developing" Put the photograph in the developing solution. That looks ...


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The response is no. You are asking the difference between 2 very different adjective. Here you can understand what I mean: differences between operative Vs Operational Anyway,for saying that the machine where used at least once at the premises you should use something like that: The machines were used on the premises / The machines were operational on the ...


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Mathematicians use the term reduced. Lexico has reduce VERB 3.2 Convert a fraction to (the form with the lowest terms). This is supported by the math site Wolfram Reduced Fraction A fraction a/b written in lowest terms, i.e., by dividing numerator and denominator through by their greatest common divisor (a,b). For example, 2/3 is the reduced fraction of 8/...


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It is a “fraction in lowest terms” or a “fraction in least terms.” The numerator and denominator share no prime factors. Shared prime factors can be cancelled.


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I just discovered today that in Portuguese we use "of", which is "de" in Portuguese, because we are expressing a restrictive adnominal adjunct, or "adjunto adnominal restritivo" in Portuguese, and this is our way of expressing this. By the way, in Latin it would be the genitive case, so, I would say that this is just how the ...


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Your rule is too simple to be correct Very few words in English have "ww" in them. In fact 99% of the words that do, are compound nouns that could be written as separate words or hyphenated. I think the only verbs with ""ww" are "bowwow" and "powwow" https://www.thefreedictionary.com/words-containing-ww The ...


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Your sentence isn't very idiomatic. Flabby is about loose skin and extra flesh. It's most commonly used to describe body parts, not people as a whole. It can have a connotation of being overweight, but you can be skinny and still have flabby body parts, because it also has to do with a lack of muscle tone. If you want to indicate that someone is overweight, &...


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