22

"In my early twenties" is a common, idiomatic expression and refers to the early part of your twenties, as a whole. But I see nothing wrong with "in my earlier twenties" in contexts such as: A person currently in their "early" twenties, speaking about the even earlier years (eg they are 23 and speaking about when they were 21). ...


8

I think most folks would say "earlier in my twenties" rather than "in my earlier twenties."


2

Your friend is correct: we find information on the computer, we also move files and install programs on the computer. It is similar to how we say that we watch the news on TV, listen to music or a talk show on the radio. In all these cases we are not talking about the physical objects themselves but their concept or idea. (It doesn't really matter what ...


2

Pigments turn the leaves red. No, red is not a noun in your example. It is an object complement functioning as adjective modifying the noun leaves. Wikipedia has an example very similar to yours. She painted the barn red. – Adjective as object complement [A]n object complement is a predicative expression that follows a direct object of an attributive ...


2

Lay bare is a phrasal verb... ...but divide over is not! The headline (which I assume it is) refers to a division (difference of opinion) within NATO over (about) Russia.


2

Both are grammatically correct. In (a), running identifies the boy, in (b) it identifies the action you want to put a stop to. In real life, with a busy road nearby I think the situation would be obvious to bystanders and you would only need to shout "Stop that boy!" If you must include running, possibly (b) is more likely (but that's opinion-based....


1

Most things related to using computers, phones, tablets or the internet tend to use "on" in English. I usually listen to music on my phone. I love watching videos on Youtube. I am learning English using the app on my tablet. I found the information on my computer.


1

I used google to find out about "infinitive phrase 'modifying an adjective'" and after a little research I found this example: The movie was too quiet to hear. The infinitive "to hear" modifies the adjective quiet.(* but see below) Note that while it modifies the adjective (it tells how quiet it was), you couldn't just replace it with ...


1

Example 1 "...until it is soft." indicates a final state to achieve. "...until it is softened" indicates a change, but leaves unstated how much change, that is just how much softer must the become. Also, I think most fluent speakers would be more likely to say: You can cook cauliflower until it has softened. This third form is ...


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