31 votes
Accepted

“ What is the different between COVID-19 antibodies that you “ - Is the word different wrong in this sentence?

Yes, that's a typo. "What is the difference" would be correct. Typos can slip in even in the most professional writing, but things on the internet exist on a wide spectrum of formality. The ...
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22 votes
Accepted

"In my early 20s, ..." or "In my earlier 20s, ...."

"In my early twenties" is a common, idiomatic expression and refers to the early part of your twenties, as a whole. But I see nothing wrong with "in my earlier twenties" in ...
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  • 74.4k
19 votes
Accepted

Can I call a door to the left 'left door'?

He came in from the left door makes sense, but does sound a bit unnatural to me. I would say one of the options below first (probably depending on how exactly the doors were configured). See Google ...
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14 votes
Accepted

How do native English people know what is a gradable adjective?

I think that you have misunderstood the meaning of very. Here is the entry from the Cambridge Dictionary: (used to add emphasis to an adjective or adverb) to a great degree or extremely If you want ...
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  • 56.5k
12 votes

Can “exacerbating” be used as an adjective

In general, yes. My mind immediately sprang toward the collocation "exacerbating factors," for instance. See this post for more on what exactly is happening syntactically (although the vast ...
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  • 334
11 votes

Can I call a door to the left 'left door'?

It sounds perfectly fine to me. Here's an example from the web: We can arrange to close the left door a little bit before the right door. — Relativity for Everyone: How Space-Time Bends It means ...
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  • 12k
10 votes
Accepted

Why is noun+adjective allowed?

I would say "insurance included" or "babysitter included" are examples of participial phrases: they use a participle to describe something about the main sentence. Participial ...
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  • 35.8k
8 votes

How do native English people know what is a gradable adjective?

Same way we know any other part of English: from the meaning discovered by listening to the use and examples of others. In the case of sphenoid, the word is so rare that there is no idiom that extends ...
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  • 153k
8 votes

"In my early 20s, ..." or "In my earlier 20s, ...."

I think most folks would say "earlier in my twenties" rather than "in my earlier twenties."
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  • 89
7 votes

Sentences structure subject+verb+object+adjectives

When we say "verb the object adjective", we mean "make the object adjective by verbing". "Boil the kettle dry" means "make the kettle dry by boiling", just as &...
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  • 35.8k
6 votes

What's the proper adjective associated with Seattle?

As pointed out by ColleenV in the comments, both "Seattle" and "California" are most idiomatically used as noun adjuncts in this context, i.e. you can say "the Seattle hotel&...
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  • 207
6 votes
Accepted

What is the "present future"?

The paragraph before provides important context: The future is full. We just do not yet know what it is. The events that will fill it are as concrete, factual and specific as those that fill our past....
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  • 12k
5 votes
Accepted

Is it good to end a sentence with several adjectives without noun?

In your example, "white" is a noun. Colours can be adjectives or nouns. Example as an adjective: She was dressed in a brilliant white dress. Saying "she was dressed in white" is ...
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  • 74.4k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it wrong to use -ed adjectives when using Personification or Transferred Epithet?

FWIW, I think the sentence: A bored pencil tapped the desk while the cruel minute hand refused to move. is a perfectly valid sentence. In fact, I think it is extremely evocative of the situation ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Do you always need 'the' before superlative adjectives?

Overview The test is correct. "Attending a school with over 800 students was her worst nightmare." is proper grammar. Details In most cases, when a superlative is used directly before a noun,...
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  • 34.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "somebody is integrate'?

Neither of your sentences would be understood by a native speaker to mean that James is a man of integrity. You need to say that he is a "man of integrity" or that he "has integrity.&...
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  • 2,853
4 votes

Is there a word for phrases that have an adverb and an adjective starting with same letter in it?

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked? The term is alliteration, but it's not restricted ...
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  • 1,158
4 votes

'Writing': is it a gerund (noun) or present participle (adjective) in this sentence?

A writing table is a table for the purpose of writing on, not a table that is in the act of writing. Writing here is a gerund used as an adjective. https://medium.com/@engtuto1/can-gerunds-be-also-...
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  • 32.3k
4 votes

How often is fine used to describe a good person during greetings?

When someone asks "are you fine" today? How are you? Are you alright? Are you okay? they want information about your particular status that day. Perhaps you look tired, or you were ...
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  • 6,539
4 votes

We say "super chill", so is it valid if I say "super mature"?

In the sense used in your example, "Super" is an adverb. An adverb according to Merriam Webster: a word that ... is often used to show time, manner, place, or degree [of something] Super ...
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  • 2,142
4 votes

Is it possible to use the phrasal verb "stand out" as an adjective?

In the sentence 'Tamara’s blue hair really makes her stand out' the phrasal verb 'stand out' is used as a verb, just like 'walk' in 'Tamara’s injured leg really makes her walk slowly'. She stands out ...
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4 votes
Accepted

How to use adjective followed by two separate things that are being described?

Yes, you need at least one article: Rob has to find a suitable shirt and hat. You don't have to provide an article for "hat," or repeat the adjective suitable; the ones attached to "...
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  • 8,697
4 votes
Accepted

Invasive (adjective)

The definition you quote seems to be from the English Language Dictionary made available by Google, and provided by Oxford Languages, and obtained when doing a Google search on "Invasive ...
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  • 34.1k
3 votes
Accepted

Can we swap (adjective+noun) with (noun+adjective)?

The word "involved" here is an adjective; it modifies "people" by indicting which people are being discussed. Both "involved people" and "people involved" ...
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  • 34.1k
3 votes

The Position of the "Necessary"

In "the confidence and skills necessary to make successful scientific presentations", "necessary to make successful scientific presentations" is an adjective phrase that ...
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  • 3,193
3 votes

How do native English people know what is a gradable adjective?

When sphenoid is an adjective, it is an anatomical usage, and technical usage at that. One would never apply sphenoid as a multiple, as in its state as a noun, it is strictly singular. One could, ...
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  • 740
3 votes

Is it actually appropriate to use "unconditional" with words such as love or nothingness?

Something that is "conditional" has conditions. In a legal context, these may be qualifying conditions. For example, you may see a special offer advertised, but the 'small print' advises you ...
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  • 74.4k
3 votes
Accepted

"The Willis Tower is taller" or "the Willis Tower is the taller"

When comparing two or more things using than, you use a comparative, for example better or more dangerous: The Burj Khalifa is taller than any other building. -many things, The Willis Tower is taller ...
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  • 56.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Should the adjective "problem" not be used before a noun?

Enough is sometimes used after nouns. The reversal is a form of emphasis. It is a little old fashioned and literary, and is acceptable in formal writing. Example - "Columbia College Today: At the ...
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3 votes

Compound adjectives with articles or not?

The first is wrong - the correct form is "a half-litre bottle".

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