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2 votes

How to use "devoid of" correctly

A place is devoid of something. It was midnight and the stadium was devoid of fans. You can use the word figuratively of a person: On that medication for hypertension she felt empty, devoid of ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

“Only vs itself” which one should I use?

I have noticed itself being used in this way in Indian English. In any other English, as far as I know, it is ungrammatical. If I correctly understand what you intend, you don't need an extra word ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

"A purple bander copy"

My guess is that it's a (purple) (bander copy) - or Banda copy, Banda being one of the common brands of spirit duplicators, which typically used purple-coloured wax. "Banda" was somewhat ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
0 votes

SHOULD I USE steady or steadily?

The former (steady) is an adjective. So, this word will be used to describe a noun. Steadily will be used in present progressive sentences. This means that any sentence that is on going, or happening ...
ethan lamb's user avatar
0 votes

Which form is more natural? early or earlier

Getting up early means getting up earlier than usual. If I wake up at 7:00 every day, then 6:00 is early, and 6:55 is also early, especially if I gave myself five extra minutes for a reason. For ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
3 votes

If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

To my Canadian ears, "roomy" only applies to things that can hold their shape, so a "roomy shirt" is incorrect. Many jackets are stiff enough that if you put one on that's too ...
gotube's user avatar
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11 votes

If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

It's not unnatural as a rule, but it might be unnatural in context, and there may be a better word: a "baggy shirt", an "oversize shirt", even "comfy shirt" might carry ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
17 votes

If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

roomy clothes is a well-attested collocation in both British and American English. Check Google Books for details. I like a really roomy shirt. I hate feeling constricted. Here's a pattern for a ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes

Difference between "reliable witness / source / data / information" and "dependable witness / source / data / information"

Most often a reliable witness refers to one deemed honest, one who seems as though they are offering truthful, accurate testimony; what they say comes across as forthcoming and unevasive, and their ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote
Accepted

1) Can "solid" mean "considerable/substantial"?— "solid money/success/age"— 2) Can "solid" mean "imposing/important-looking"?— "solid appearance/man"

Can the word "solid" be used in the meaning of "considerable, substantial"? No. There are some circumstances where the size of something makes it solid, so both words can be used ...
gotube's user avatar
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1 vote

1) Can "solid" mean "considerable/substantial"?— "solid money/success/age"— 2) Can "solid" mean "imposing/important-looking"?— "solid appearance/man"

Yes, solid can mean "considerable, substantial." However, to apply this usage well, you should think of it as metaphorical or symbolic. If I punch the solid wall I will hurt my hand; but I ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
0 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

The other answers have thoroughly covered the difference between partially freezing and freezing solid, but with the clothes example my mind immediately jumped to freezing onto something. If you said &...
aantia's user avatar
  • 379
4 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

The way I'm used to using and hearing the phrase (in America) is that "frozen solid" refers to and re-emphasizes the rigidity of the substance, not its temperature. For example, if a river ...
Jamin Grey's user avatar
16 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Firstly, to freeze doesn't only mean to change from a liquid to solid state due to a temperature change. To freeze also means for something to get stuck, or for something or someone to stop moving. ...
Kaz's user avatar
  • 6,726
-6 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Froze is a verb (past tense). Solid is an adverb. It's like saying "She ran quickly" or "He waved excitedly" or "He died happily".
Fattie's user avatar
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23 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

Sometimes a body of water is described as frozen when only the surface is ice, but there is liquid water beneath. The term frozen solid specifies that the entire body of water has become ice; there is ...
Peter's user avatar
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34 votes

Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

There are different degrees of freezing. A light frost is different from a frost that penetrates through something. So saying "froze solid" you mean that the freezing was complete and ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
-1 votes

What does the word "solid" mean in the context of detective work when talking about an aspect of a crime

If you're studying for an exam, you can say I have chapters 1 to 6 down pat. The practical meaning is that you know that material well. Similarly, if a detective says about the criminal charges of &...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
3 votes
Accepted

What does the word "solid" mean in the context of detective work when talking about an aspect of a crime

Does this mean that the detective has reliable evidence that what transpired in the client's house was in fact a burglary? Can only the fact that someone broke in can be gleaned from that (not who did ...
fatalerrer's user avatar

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