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As Orbital Aussie noted, the speaker is using 'baby speak' to make it easier. The correct term is: triangular hole Similarly, you have quoted a difference between British and North American English, whereas my experience of both places is that use of the term 'right-angled triangle' would be used when speaking formally and / or to adults, whereas you ...


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Colours are both noun and adjective: Adjective: I like the red shirt. Noun: I like red. However, that doesn't really help your example, for two reasons. The main one is that it is not quite clear what you mean. I'm guessing that you mean "a shirt just like this, but in red", or "an red example of this kind of shirt". We wouldn't say that as "a ...


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It is not the case of any unreal conditional. It's a usual case of the Future Conditional (or, Conditional One). So, the grammatically and semantically right grammar structure for the idea behind your question is that: If am not busy tomorrow, I will come with you. The reason is that there is no unreal event in the - if clause. This event is really possible. ...


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I make a cake on Saturdays. [regular voice, action verb] The cakes are made of flour, sugar, butter and eggs. Passive voice: to be made of The moon is not made of cheese. The universe made the moon.


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You are using a verb “it’s”. You are using 3rd person of verb "to be": is. That means that sentence is in present continuous. The correct answer is "it is snowing" you can also say “it’s a snowy day” because snowy is an adverb.


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I presume you are asking for an adjective to modify "thief." "Audacious" means "extremely bold." Whan applied to "thief," it does not entail "visible" or "public." That attribute may be what makes a thief audacious, but climbing down a high wall into a building full of armed guards and watch dogs would also be "audacious." The word you probably are looking ...


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Actually you don't care about microns, you are asking about thickness. This means that you don't need use the units of measurement. Provided you have established that you are talking about the regulations for bags, then: What is the maximum thickness of plastic permitted for bags in your country? This is a typical XY problem, and in fact you had already ...


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to board Flight 139 = an infinitive phrase What Is an Infinitive Phrase? (with Examples) An infinitive phrase is the infinitive form of a verb plus any complements and modifiers. The complement of an infinitive verb will often be its direct object, and the modifier will often be an adverb. For example: He likes to knead the dough slowly. (...


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I doubt that there is an adjective that conveys that complex concept. Sometimes you need more than one word to convey a thought; otherwise any book longer than one word would be verbose and redundant. But "universally comprehensible" or "humanly comprehensible" should work. By the way, and this is an unsolicited opinion, I do not think "coherent" expresses ...


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Because participles can play a role as adjectives, they can be formed into adverbs. Drunkenly is an example that is used with fair frequency. However, the formation of adverbs from perfect participles seems to be rare; what is far more common is the formation of adverbs from present participles. I have no explanation for this; it is simply a personal ...


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I have a feeling that there isn't one single word that describes (1) "someone who is constantly striving for glory" and (2) "someone who loves to be admired or loved for what they did" at the same time. My answer gives you relevant terms which can be made to work depending on the context and how you phrase the sentence. For the first one, you can use (a)...


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These are called semantic differentiation scales in marketing and customer satisfaction questionnaires. semantic differentiation They work through opposite ends of a scale like: good/bad or satisfactory/unsatisfactory. This group of words does not conform to a regular good/bad scale semantically as it uses the word sufficient, the opposite of which is ...


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Because they are different semantic categories of words, you can't rank sufficient on the same scale as good, satisfactory, or bad. Consider the following: "I see you can't even afford a cup of coffee. Would $1.30 be sufficient?" "Yes, thank you. If that's all you can spare, it will still get me what I need for the moment." "I see you can't even ...


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Satisfactory and Sufficient seem to have very similar meanings. I would not be able to distinguish between them. Your list has the problem that four out of five options suggest "no action needs to be taken". Using "satisfactory" suggests to some people "everything is okay" but it suggests to others that "Improvements need to be made". I would suggest (...


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A minority language is one spoken only by a minority of people in a region. However English has never been a minority language in England (at least not in the last 1000 years). An obscure language is one which few people know about. But it isn't clear that English was ever particularly obscure, compared with other European Languages. A regional language ...


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