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1

The main difference between those sentences is that one is grammatically correct, and the other is not. He is a God-worshipping. This is wrong, because (as you've correctly noted), "God-worshipping" is an adjective, not a noun. "is" can take either an adjective or a noun, but when using an adjective, you cannot use an article ("a"/"an"/"the"), because ...


0

I'd say entitled would be the best adjective for this. But greedy would also be true.


0

"I am feeling" is a redundant and improper form, what about "good" as an adverb...lol! Why people try to change the grammar rules of the English language? To confuse us even more? What do you earn when you change "I feel" to I am feeling? Just nothing. "I feel" itself means "I feel at the moment". Then why to change it giving it progressive form? If it ...


0

"Gasping", the -ing form of the verb "gasp", can function as a gerund (a noun) or as part of a conjugated verb. The gasping was audible. (noun) The man is/was gasping audibly. (part of a progressive verb).


1

Yes it is. It attributes a property, goodness, to the pants. If the expression were "The pants are good.", that would be a predicate adjective. What other possibility did you have in mind?


0

Which of these two choices (-minded or -driven) to choose depends on the manner of thinking of the doer, as in this case, about money. Minded: having a mind especially of a specified kind or concerned with a specified thing —usually used in combination, such as narrow-minded or health-minded Driven: propelled or motivated by something —used in ...


7

In my opinion, it is redundant but somewhat necessary to inform the general population. The word "pandemic" describes the outbreak of a disease which already has (or is very close to) affect every community in the world. To understand the glossary better, you have to look at the endemic and epidemic as well. Endemic describes the outbreak of a disease ...


28

Not redundant. Every definition of pandemic that I’ve read specifies that the word is used when referring to widespread diseases and not just global ones. For example, see Wikipedia’s definition. Disease travels a lot faster and further than it did before, because people do, so I’m not sure how many more non-global pandemics we will have. The Black Plague ...


0

First, "meal" is not an idiomatic verb. I suspect that what you mean As he didn't eat a meal, he [wants/wanted] to make his payment a few dollars short. "Payment" is a noun, the direct object of "to make," rather than an adjective or adverb. And As he didn't eat a meal, he [wants/wanted] to make a few dollars short payment is not idiomatic at all. "...


1

I assume you mean a computer serving information, not a waitress serving food. Yes, it's a common metaphor.


0

"we" is a subjective pronoun, "me" is an objective pronoun. We decided it should belong to me. I decided it should belong to us. Subjective pronouns don't take adjectives, and objective pronouns only rarely take adjectives. I want to be the best me I can be. The good me wants to eat healthily, but the bad me wants to eat junk food. Note how ...


0

Your question makes no sense. Phrases lacking verbs are not grammatically correct or incorrect although they may well be uncommon or puzzling. In practice it would be possible to include both your examples in sentences in the right context. It all depends on how you construct your sentences. For example: He's not in love with clever you, he's in love ...


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