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2

I have added some brackets to show how to group the words: (My (previous (good computer))) cost me $500. In the past I owned a good computer, and it cost $500. The adjective "previous" modifies "good computer". (My ((previously good) computer)) cost me $500. In an unspecified time (but probably the present), I own or owned a computer which cost $500....


2

"My previous good computer [...]" means "the good computer I owned before my current good computer". "My previously good computer [...]" means "my computer which used to be good but is no longer so". I hope this helps.


0

This fun is a noun. It is described by a lot of.


2

I gather you're extrapolating from the use of "dead" as an intensifier in other expressions such as "dead certain" or "dead on" (as well as "dead right", "dead on time", etc.) where "dead" means "absolutely" or "perfectly". In English as in any language, you can apply the idiomatic use to a new context, but you may confuse your audience. I would ...


2

I would use with caution. Its not really proper English but is used quite commonly among the less well spoken population. It is becoming more common, but (in my opinion) should not used as an adverb at all. I'm not sure why you couldn't find it on google. I tried "dead as an adverb" and there were plenty of results. E.g. Oxford Learners Dictionary Note ...


4

The more the sincere one's effort is, the faster their one's growth is. Subject to the corrections I've made, there is nothing grammatically wrong with this sentence. You could replace the analytic "more sincere" by inflectional "sincerer", though many speakers dislike the latter. And some speakers (like me) would prefer plural "efforts". If you must ...


9

Your example: The more the sincere one's effort is, the faster their growth is. is very close. There are two fixes you need: you have an extra "the" in the first one. I'll show some examples below. the subject changes from "one" to "their". This is a violation of parallelism. Parallelism just means that between parts (1) and (2), when things are the ...


4

The sentence suffers stylistically for several reasons—and the second article shouldn't be there at all. Any of the following would be more natural: The more one's effort is sincere, the more one's growth is fast. The more one's effort is sincere, the faster is one's growth. The more sincere is one's effort, the faster is one's growth. (I ...


0

Social-liberty-success Or Societal-autonomy-success Or Liberal-life-success


4

The requirements of the question are: an adjective that describes “freedom” or “liberty” the word success This is very difficult. Not every noun in English has a good adjective form. Some nouns have good adjectives: economics — economic (or economical) ecology — ecological trees — arboreal cows — bovine pigs — porcine ...


1

An increase in peoples Civic Freedoms and/or Liberties.


2

An adverb usually follows the verb, but can precede it, possibly giving emphasis to it. Google Ngram Viewer shows that 'he carefully thought' is about half as common as 'he thought carefully'. 'You' and 'they' are similar, but 'she carefully thought' is only about one-tenth as common as 'she thought carefully' and there is no record of 'we carefully thought' ...


-1

In this case the word "carefully" is an adverb; a word that describes the verb. These words usually end in "ly", such as quickly, happily, quietly. To answer your question, you should place the adverb after the verb it describes, so in your question, (1) is correct.


2

You can call it an artificial island: Osaka airport was built on an artificial island in the bay, as there was no more space in the city. When land is reclaimed from side of a river, it is called an embankment. Cleopatra's needle was installed in London on the embankment of the Thames. A large flat area reclaimed from the sea and protected by dykes, ...


1

Land reclamation or “infilled land” are two ways I’ve seen of describing this process.


0

'At, in, on' and ''to' are used as both time prepositions and place prepositions in English. (s) should not be added. I think "time" is an adjective. This is true? True. It may also be referred to as an adjectival noun, noun modifier, or attributive noun. When applying a noun as an adjective, it's usually singular. There are various exceptions ...


0

I have checked some material which says "for somebody to do something" is a compound structure used to be attribute such as "It’s time for everybody to go to bed." So in this example (This is the last call for passengers to board Flight 139 at Gate 57.) this is the subject; is the predicate; the last call is the predicative or complement for subject; and for ...


0

To make it more cognizable let us take up the pattern where we have the preposional complementation by the infinitive clause: "The stewardess called for the passengers to board the plane". Here we are dealing with monotransitive complementation by the nonfinite clause. In this case the construction is that of a preposional verb "call for" and the infinitive ...


0

Notice that all three sentences: This is the last call for passengers. This is the last call to board Flight 139. This is the last call at Gate 57. Are all correct and the final phrases all mean much the same as in the the full sentence. This suggests that each phrase is independent of the others, and in particular "to board flight 139" is not an ...


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