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In casual conversation, you can safely use these two phrases interchangeably. It's a very small nuance, but I generally use "that's true" when someone presents new information or ideas I hadn't previously considered, and "that's right" when someone reminds me of something I previously knew. I'm not sure this is an official rule of ...


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He has been tired to study. This is currently ungrammatical. It could be rewritten as either: a. He has been too tired to study. Meaning, he cannot study because he is overly tired. Tired in this case is acting as an adjective, and the present perfect form of "to be" ("has been") is the verb. (see Note 3) Or: b. He has been tired by ...


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In the present day, I felt gloomily would be taken for an error in standard English— one says I felt gloomy. We regard feel (and various senses of other verbs of states of being like sound, taste, or appear) as a linking verb (copula) when there is an adjective complement, as the subject and its complement are being related or equated: I feel happy ≈ I am ...


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I see "hot-shot", "hotshot" an "hot shot" used. Are all of them correct? All of those seem to be used to some extent. Cambridge suggests both "hotshot" and "hot shot", Collins mentions all three forms. Is "hot-shot" a natural adjective to put on a business man who is successful? It's natural, but ...


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[1] These students are [difficult to teach]. [2] Different types of models will be necessary, [depending on what forecast horizon is most important]. [3] Forecasts that need to be produced frequently are better [done using an automated system than with methods that require careful manual work]. In [1] the infinitival clause is, as you say, complement of &...


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He looked stunned when he realized that she lives here. Yes. The sentence is fine if she still lives there. However, the past sentence is still preferred regardless of whether she still lives there or not. He looked stunned when he realized that she lived there. This is due to the phenomenon called 'back-shift'. In English grammar, backshift is the ...


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To support stevekeiretsu's answer, I see on the IRS website (mirror): Unmarried individual (or married filing separately): Total value of assets was more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year, or more than $75,000 at any time during the year. As a result, it indeed seems ok to use "tax" as as adjective.


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The correct word to use is widow. My father died when I was nine, and so my mother was a widow with four young children. This is because with 'a' you should use the noun widow instead of the verb widowed. Alternatively, you could say My father died when I was nine, and so my mother was widowed with four young children. widowed is the past participle of ...


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With “a” present before it, you would use “widow”. You would say this as either: My father died when I was nine, and so my mother was a widow with four young children. My father died when I was nine, and so my mother was widowed with four young children. So, in this case, it’s the first of the two sentences.


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BillJ: Your sentence is distinctly odd, but nevertheless "taken" is a past participle verb modifying "photos". Although it's only a single word, it is still analysed as a past-participial clause. Me: A past-participle is a modifier that works like an adjective. Some adjectives are past participles that have basically become adjectives, e....


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You may think in this way: At what moment does the imitation process begin? (The imitation process begins) when the collection is presented on catwalks through some of the photos taken. The part inside the parenthesis is omitted. And now strike the below part to make the meaning of 'taken' clearer. The imitation process begins when the collection is ...


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