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You would have to refer to the paper's styleguide, but my suspicion would be that it's a way of compactly and specifically saying that the soldier is part of the Indian army. An "Indian soldier" might work for any country's military, as "Indian" is an adjective that might be referring to the soldier's heritage, or a number of other ...


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'Tasty' is informal, casual or conversational; 'delicious' is more formal. A meal may consist of one or more dishes - a meal of soup, curry and rice, and pudding is a meal of three dishes.


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A good rule of thumb is if the removal of the final e changes the pronunciation, don't remove it. It means we can't remove the e from words that end with a ⟨c⟩ or a ⟨g⟩: noticeable (/s/) manageable (/d͡ʒ/) interchangeable (/d͡ʒ/) etc., you cannot remove the final e because if you do, you'll end up with: *noticable (/k/) *managable (/g/) *interchangable (/...


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In It is passed directly ... the "directly" is an adverb telling you how it is passed, so an adverb modifying the verb. In It is passed unmodified the "ummodified" is an adjective telling you about it, so an adjective. There's no grammatical reason to object to placing it after the verb. I wouldn't want to read about passing it ...


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To be brief, "a different age category" and "different age categories" are both correct, with one singular and the other plural. And yes, you do need the article in the singular case. I do want to correct one thing. The adjective is not "a different age". Instead, it works like this: "Category" is of course a noun. &...


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I think that the thing that will help is to imagine the sentence without the adjective and decide if an article is necessary - here's a simpler sentence. I wouldn't mind having a house. We use "a" before "house" because we need an article for the noun... similarly, if we use an adjective, while it's coming between the article and the ...


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No, there can usually be only one specifier in a noun phrase. You proposed parse as [a different age] [category] doesn't make sense. It parses semantically as [a different] [age category]. But either way, there can be at most one article for the whole phrase. You can certainly say different age categories, and this refers to more than one age category, and ...


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As one commenter said, often there isn't much logic to which preposition sounds natural! However in this case, I would think about the meaning of the sentence without the prepositional phrase: The country is full. This seems to be lacking information. We are left asking, full of what? The country is rich. This is a complete thought; the country is ...


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To add to what people have already said, it also adds emphasis by describing the the voice first, before getting into the more mundane details of who owns it etc. Starting with that info and then getting into the evocative description loses a bit of impact. You also lose the mystery of gradually revealing the truth by just throwing it out there immediately. ...


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It was the beautiful voice of a woman. This is the better option because you haven't seen the woman yet, you've only heard her. The focus of the statement is the sound, so it makes sense that you say you heard the voice of a woman rather than a woman's voice. Also, as the woman is singing, you'll find it is far more common with statements about music to ...


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The correct positive response to "how are you doing" is "I am doing well". Often people will say "I'm good", which is idiomatic but probably not strictly speaking grammatical. The negative response, then, would be "I am doing badly". Contrary to U11-Forward's answer, this is perfectly correct and understandable. "...


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The first one is correct. It says "I am doing bad". When you feel good you would say "I am doing good", it's an exact opposite of "I am doing bad". Saying "I am doing badly" would sound strange. As the mentioned in the Dictionary, the meaning of "badly" is: in an unsatisfactory, inadequate, or unsuccessful ...


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The past simple just talks about a past event, whereas the present perfect talks about a past event which is having an effect on the present. Saying your device was repaired only really says something about what happened in the past - it might still be repaired at the current time, or maybe it's broken again, but the past simple doesn't really imply anything ...


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-ing forms can function as adjectives and nouns - here's an example from Practical English Usage: You're smoking too much these days (verb: part of present progressive) There was a smoking cigarette end in the ashtray (adjective describing cigarette end) Smoking is bad for you (noun: subject of sentence) The verb/adjective forms are called present ...


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I think you are conflating present perfect progressive/continuous with present perfect. In present perfect progressive/continuous, "has been" is followed by an -ing verb. He has been running. In your sentence however, "repaired" should be viewed as an adjective, so your sentence has the present perfect form of "to be." Your ...


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I think your teacher is mistaken. Generally, "tall" refers to height (how tall something is), while "high" refers to location. I would personally refer to "the tallest mountains," but I'd say that they have "the highest peaks." The peaks are located high up (at the top of the tall mountains), so that describes the ...


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This is a really interesting question. I think as a general rule we use tall for objects which are attached to the ground near us especially if their vertical extent is greater than their horizontal. So tall person, tower, tree, mast. We use high for larger objects or ones not attached to the ground so high cloud, peak, mountain. So in your example tall ...


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There is interesting recent work on a very similar phenomenon by Adele Goldberg. This work is in linguistics, but it is written in quite a simple style, and can be understood by the non-specialist. Goldberg was interested in why you can say things like The boy is awake but not The awake boy went home See https://adele.princeton.edu/wp-content/uploads/...


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He is small enough to walk. This means that if he were bigger, he couldn't walk. Obviously this doesn't agree with our usual experience with babies, which normally start walking when they get bigger. Possibly the discussion is about "walking the baby", that is, pushing the baby around in a stroller (aka pram), and the meaning is that if the baby ...


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The most common usage of "amicable" is to indicate that a situation is friendly and peaceable when it could easily be hostile. Consider the example from dictionary.com: adjective characterized by or showing goodwill; friendly; peaceable: an amicable settlement. A "settlement"? This is about an argument or legal battle - something that ...


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A subject complement: adds information about the subject usually comes after linking verbs As you rightly said, 'the hawker' is the subject in your example. This could also be written as: A hawker is outside. Written this way, 'outside' adds information (location) about the subject. A preposition shows the relative positioning between two things, so ...


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Has + past participle (what you're calling Verb3) is the present perfect. Is + past participle is the passive. (They can be combined: has been + past participle is a present perfect passive.) But only transitive verbs can use the passive, so is gone and has been gone are not possible verb phrases. However, many past participles can also be used as adjectives,...


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As a couple of comments suggest, normal English would usually use "main site header". It follows the common adjective ordering. I would say that in this case "site" describes a more innate property of the "header", so it goes closer to the noun. You might even think of "site header" as a compound noun, especially in ...


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