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You wouldn't typically do that with a single word adjective, but you would with an adjective phrase. I met a girl cute as can be. This is a book interesting to people who love computers, but no one else. That dog with eyes black as coal is mine. France is a country famous for its beautiful sights. A person smarter than me needs to ...


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I believe you're a bit confused. Instead of [noun] [adjective], it should be [adjective] [noun]. So, your original idea becomes, [adjective] [noun] equals [noun] [that is] [adjective]. And it's true for every sentence that you've mentioned. She is a cute girl. She's a girl that is cute. This is an interesting book. This is a book that ...


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The word "whole" is certainly used as an adverb. However, there are situations that this word is not acceptable as an adverb.


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The video seems to me to be poorly made, and I found several more strange errors over the course of a minute or two, so I think "more richer" is just a mistake. For example, here is the first sentence of the video, with errors marked: Once there was a rich merchant, [1] he decided to load all his wealth into his two ships to [2] the [3] other lands to ...


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Yes it can be an adverb - just not in your example sentence. An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb. In your example, it is modifying the noun "week". For it to be an adverb, there would need to be another adjective or verb used, for example: It's a whole new ballgame. That's a whole other story.


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In the cited context, even is an optional "intensifier" (in He got [even] richer, the implication is he was already quite rich before the later increase in wealth). But whether or not even is included doesn't affect the grammatical issue as regards how English expresses comparatives and superlatives. Briefly, monosyllabic adjectives usually take the ...


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Since whole modifies the noun week, it is an adjective (but see below about determiners). Here are other sentences with an adjective modifying week: It rained all of last week except on Sunday. It rained twice during that unpleasant week. Adverbs modify anything other than a noun: a verb, an adjective, a preposition, another adverb, or a whole ...


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It rained the whole(entire) week except on Sunday In the sentence whole modifies week which is a noun. So it is a an Adjective. It is not an adverb.An adverb usually does not modify a noun or a pronoun.It may modify a noun phrase or sometimes a whole sentence.


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Only a small difference. Consider using a simpler adjective and noun "red" and "cat". Are both [of them] red cats? This asks both about the colour and the species. The answer could be "No, they are red dogs" or "No, they are black cats". (or "Yes, they are") Are both cats red? This assumes they are cats, and asks only about the colour. The answer ...


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Yes, both are grammatical. We are dealing with ellipsis. Both examples are viable examples can be made more compact without loss of sense by Both examples are viable or by Both are viable examples The first form of ellipsis is turned into a question Are both examples viable? The second form is turned into a question Are both viable ...


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The question is grammatically correct, but the teacher would be more likely to say Is anybody absent/away today? The yes/no part of your proposed answers is not correct, though. If nobody is absent, the students would answer "no" to the teacher's question: No miss, everyone is here today There are additional problems with your answers when one or ...


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"Yes miss, everyone is here today." or "No miss, everyone is not here today." Both sentences above are answers to the question "Is everyone present today?" or "Is everyone here today?" They are not proper answers to the question "Is any student absent today?" To which, the appropriate answer would be "Yes miss, Carla is absent. She is sick." ...


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You can make both work, but you are missing articles and verbs. If you simplify the sentence to the bare minimum of "He offered me" then to answer the question "what did he offer?" you would say "a price" so "He offered me a price." Then we want to describe the price, we can say either "a price ten dollars lower" or "ten dollar lower price." Notice dollar ...


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Acutally, the wordhippo website does it quite well: https://www.wordhippo.com/ For example, when we search for an adjective for the noun flower, the website returns six adjectives: flowery (pertaining to flowers, or decorated with or abundant in flowers) flowered (a plant that has produced flowers, or something that is covered with flowers) flowering (a ...


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Grammatical but Possibly Awkward Overview The example sentences in the question are not grammatically wrong. Adjectives are most often followed by nouns, but elided forms and various fixed phrases and idioms can alter that. However, this sort of construction can be awkward, and often recasting it will improve and clarify the sentence. This depends very ...


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I am not at my best until lunch. At one's most/least [adjective] is a fixed idiom; it may or may not be elliptical for at its most/least [adjective] state/condition/..., but those nouns would call for in rather than at. That is, we rarely say at a state or at a condition, we say in a state etc.


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These sentences do not use correct grammar. Every adjective must be followed by a noun. Examples: INCORRECT: She got married at 25 when she was at her most beautiful. CORRECT: She got married at 25 when she was at her most beautiful stage in life.


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Overview I think any of "inconsistent" "irregular", "variable", "varied", or "uneven" could work for this. I think you have been too ready to accept a single definition as barring a perfectly valid use of a word. The choice of which term to use there is a matter of style and personal choice. Dictionary citations Irregular Merriam-Webster gives: ...


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"Worker A had regular weekly earnings... " works fine. consistent or steady also can be used with the same meaning. I think the problem lies in your research. You did the right thing, but unfortunately Google and Ngram do not always return the results you would expect. I've been chided here for quoting their statistics, so I don't rely on them any more. ...


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Your example makes better use of "other": Sorry, I just meant something I observe in other discussions, not in our past topics But in other contexts, you can use other adjectives. See below: In the different discussions that I had, I noticed... During the various discussions in the past... You may even use "elsewhere", but with a different word ...


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Our own identities were simply given to us complete. Syntactically, the adjective "complete" is not actually located within the subject noun phrase "our own identities", but within the verb phrase "given to us complete", so we can't say it modifies "identities". Semantically, it does of course refer to "identities", so such elements are known as ...


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Yes, you have got it exactly. It is not a common construction. The meaning is Our identities were completely determined without any personal involvement. That is a perfectly comprehensible statement, but not completely plausible because such complete determinism is inconsistent with any sense of self. (I am sympathetic to determinism, but I also ...


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It is also worth noting that "wealthy" is a much politer way of saying that someone has a lot of money than "rich" is. Often, this is a topic that should be talked about with some caution. So for example: He is rich! > There is a slight air of disgust/jealousy perhaps; I am showing my opinion towards the fact that this person has a lot of money and it is ...


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Many of the examples could be interpreted as either a verb or an adjective. "The wall is painted." If you point to a wall covered in paints, then "painted" is an adjective. If you are narrating a story, and there's a live scene of painters actively painting the wall, then "is painted" could be a passive verb construction. "The car is heated." If ...


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Generally, hyphenate two or more words when they come before a noun they modify and act as a single idea. This is called a compound adjective. Examples: an off-campus apartment state-of-the-art design a five-mile-long road A five-year-old whiskey (or whisky sometimes) A five-year-old boy


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