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19 votes
Accepted

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

Although the meaning of 'no-go' is negative, the sentence - It's a [... kind of] day is positive, so you must use 'too'. Compare We're not going to have a fine day tomorrow either.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
9 votes
Accepted

Adverb "environmentally"

Close enough that in most situations they are interchangeable. Structurally the first has the adverb acting as a modifier of "disastrous", and the second has the adverb as an adjunct of the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
8 votes

Placing an adverb between a verb and an object?

To paraphrase "Pirates of the Caribbean", think of this more as a guideline than an actual rule. With creative writing, it is often possible to place the adverb anywhere it sounds good. Because ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
7 votes

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

As Kate Bunting says, grammatically it's positive, so it's "too" rather than "either". And there should be a comma between "today" and "too". However, it might ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
6 votes

Is "especially so you" correct and idiomatic in this dictionary definition?

Does it make more sense if we insert that? to divide something into many small parts especially so that you can use the result for your own purposes If not, then let us consider one of the ...
Em.'s user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

"function models ONLY two variables at a time" vs. "function ONLY models two variables at a time" - place the adverb correctly

There can be a subtle difference between the two sentences—although they would not normally be distinguished from each other in common use. In method A, function B only models two variables at a ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
5 votes

Placing an adverb between a verb and an object?

[I had already written most of this before @Andrew posted his answer. It says pretty much the same thing, but I thought I might as well post it, having written it.] "Don’t put adverbs between the ...
fred2's user avatar
  • 5,823
5 votes

word usage “only”

This isn’t a correct way of saying only. In these cases, rather than saying ‘only’ you would say ‘alone’; I am at home alone. I am at the railway station alone. You could also say: I am the only ...
Buzzyy's user avatar
  • 995
5 votes

Adverb "environmentally"

OP's first version is the "syntactic default" for English - the adverb (environmentally) goes next to the verb (is). The second version is a "stylistic inversion" with exactly the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

A locative complement before the direct object - is 'Do not park here your motorbike' correct?

In this sentence, here is an adverb of place that applies to the verb park. According to this guide, it is normal to put adverbs of place at the end of a clause. They sometimes go at the start of ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
4 votes

The position of ALSO in a sentence

I would interpret these two sentences with slightly different meanings. The context would probably give a much stronger indication of the correct interpretation, though. You also are allowed to see ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
4 votes

The warden told the boys to (quickly?) clean their rooms (quickly?)

What you have likely encountered is an exam-maker's intolerance for the split infinitive, i.e. the insertion of any word in a to-infinitive between to and the verb. To quickly clean is a split ...
choster's user avatar
  • 17.7k
4 votes
Accepted

What determines the position of the adverb? Example: I could never learn to swim. or I never could learn to swim

Strictly speaking, they mean something different. One is a statement about future events, and the other is about past events. I could never learn to swim. Looking forward, learning to swim is not ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
4 votes

Does English (proper) allow "sharp ass claws"

It's slang, not 'proper English', but the meaning is very different depending on where you put the hyphen. Sharp-ass claws Its claws are remarkably sharp Sharp ass-claws It has claws in its ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
4 votes

"function models ONLY two variables at a time" vs. "function ONLY models two variables at a time" - place the adverb correctly

I think that in your particular context, both sentences will be understood correctly. However, I would use the second sentence, because "Function only models two variables at a time" can theoretically ...
CowperKettle's user avatar
  • 36.6k
4 votes

Placing an adverb between a verb and an object?

The rule you've quoted is not always followed. See this discussion, in which it is pointed out that the adverb can go between the verb and the object when the object is long or complicated. Note, ...
hguler's user avatar
  • 545
4 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to place "smiling" after the verb instead of at the end? "She reread smiling the typed note"

In this context, "smiling" isn't an adverb of manner, and it does not directly modify the verb itself. Rather, "smiling" is a reduced form of "while smiling", or "...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Is the sentence incomplete without the use of There at the end of the sentence? What is the purpose?

It is not incorrect to put there at the end of that sentence. Without there the listener (reasonably) infers that the horses and donkeys are there. The purpose of there is merely to say that the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
3 votes

Can we use "indeed" in negative sentences to emphasize the negative point?

You can use indeed in a negative sentence. In an isolated sentence like this, "indeed" would more likely be in agreement to another's statement. He isn't very wise No, He indeed is not a wise ...
eques's user avatar
  • 4,485
3 votes
Accepted

Does English (proper) allow "sharp ass claws"

xkcd comic https://xkcd.com/37/ This would be understood to mean "sharp-ass claws" where "sharp-ass" means something like "extremely sharp". Adding "-ass" to an adjective to intensify it is a fairly ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes
Accepted

also have or have also

The difference between these 2 sentences are only a matter of opinion and preference, both: Whoever was in your shoes, they would also have done that. and Whoever was in your shoes, they would ...
Veraen's user avatar
  • 436
3 votes
Accepted

she really grew THAT nail THAT long

Your quote is problematic, but not because you use the word that twice. The problem is that your quote doesn't match your picture. If the person's hand looked like this: then you might want to ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
3 votes

Using While in a sentence

If a man is tasked with hitting on a girl while wearing a skirt and heels, that means the man has to be wearing a skirt and heels at the time he does the hitting-on. If he has to hit on a girl, ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
3 votes

The adverb "today" before the verb "be" in the middle of a sentence. Correct? But there's no such a rule

Today can be placed there because in these sentences it does not attach to the verb but to the subject noun phrase. [Traffic jams today] are hardcore. Other expressions of time can do the same ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
3 votes

word usage “only”

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, only can be used in two ways: as an adjective, meaning that there is a single one of something. as an adverb, meaning 'not more' When it is used as an ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
3 votes

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

I agree with what Kate Bunting and Acccumulation already said. Just wanted to add that an even more natural/informal way of stating the same idea (at least to me), would be something along the lines ...
user182308's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How can the position of 'only' change the meaning of a sentence?

Side note: I'm not sure what the intended meaning of the sentence is. Perhaps you meant to say, "It only seemed that way as India took the lead from Australia", i.e. Australia had the lead but now ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
2 votes

A locative complement before the direct object - is 'Do not park here your motorbike' correct?

?? Do not park here your motorbike. Frankly, it sounds like something a learner would write. But it is simply not idiomatic. This is because adverbs modifying verbs do not appear between the verb ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What is the right position of emphasis adverbs in a short answer?

It depends on the word(s) chosen and on the question posed. Are you laughing at me, punk? I am indeed. Indeed I am. no I indeed am. To be sure, I am. I am, to be sure. noI, to be sure, am. I ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes
Accepted

Which is correct: the master’s dissertation will <officially> be <officially> added <officially> to your curriculum

As @J.R. points out in the comments, "officially" can be added in more than one place in your example sentence. Officially, the graduation year is when the dissertation will be added to ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k

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