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19 votes
Accepted

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

Although the meaning of 'no-go' is negative, the sentence - It's a [... kind of] day is positive, so you must use 'too'. Compare We're not going to have a fine day tomorrow either.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.5k
9 votes
Accepted

Adverb "environmentally"

Close enough that in most situations they are interchangeable. Structurally the first has the adverb acting as a modifier of "disastrous", and the second has the adverb as an adjunct of the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
7 votes

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

As Kate Bunting says, grammatically it's positive, so it's "too" rather than "either". And there should be a comma between "today" and "too". However, it might ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
5 votes

Adverb "environmentally"

OP's first version is the "syntactic default" for English - the adverb (environmentally) goes next to the verb (is). The second version is a "stylistic inversion" with exactly the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
3 votes

Is “either” or “too” better in "It's a no-go today ____"?

I agree with what Kate Bunting and Acccumulation already said. Just wanted to add that an even more natural/informal way of stating the same idea (at least to me), would be something along the lines ...
user182308's user avatar
1 vote

"They ventured nervously into the water." & "He nervously ventured out onto the ice."— Difference between "ventured nervously" & "nervously ventured"?

They ventured nervously into the water. They nervously ventured into the water. For both pairs, each example means the same as its counterpart, but ventured nervously is more common than nervously ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

"Too much" versus "much too"

Too basic = more basic than it should be. Much too basic = a lot more basic than it should be. Much sugar = a lot of sugar Too much sugar = more sugar than there should be. You would use “too much” ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 3,877
1 vote

"Too much" versus "much too"

It's worth noting that, when an adjective is modified by "much" (and some similar words), it can go before the article. So this is also an option that some people might find less awkward: ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
  • 3,211

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