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46 votes

Sentences containing "refused to close his bar because"

Both of the sentences are grammatical, but you're right that they are either ambiguous or don't mean what you want them to mean. To make the meaning explicitly clear, use despite instead of because: ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
35 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

What about good old "so"? German-made parts are way too expensive, so we ordered Chinese ones. This is by far the most natural way of saying this.
minseong's user avatar
  • 2,088
19 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

I guess you want to use a subordinate conjunction (or a phrase with similar functionality) which simply means "because". In this context, I can mention several ones as below: Thus Therefore Hence ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
18 votes

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

Sentence (a) is awkward. Sentence (b) is colloquial. In (a) the word "hardly" would be more concise than "almost don't": My sons hardly talk to each other. In (b) you could replace ...
Old Brixtonian's user avatar
10 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Given: assigned as a basis of calculation, reasoning, etc.: Given A and B, C follows. dictionary.com So your sentence would read: German-made parts are way too expensive. Given that, we ...
AndyT's user avatar
  • 2,133
9 votes

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

I would easily understand a., but it's not natural. To capture that meaning, you could say, "My sons practically don't talk to each other" or "My sons pretty much don't talk to each ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
8 votes

Is "last two years ago, I was in a classical concert " a correct sentence?

*Last two years ago is incorrect because it combines two constructions with different senses: Ago is a preposition which, unusually, follows its object. That object is a measurement of distance in ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
8 votes

How to identify the adverbials in a phrase?

It is clear that your daughter's teacher (or textbook) makes a distinction between adverb and adverbial. Adverb is the traditional term for a class of words—those words which by themselves can '...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

How to identify the adverbials in a phrase?

"Adverbial" is a function, not a word/phrase category, that may be realised by an AdvP (he spoke quickly), a PP (He spoke with enthusiasm), an NP (He’s speaking this evening). In your first example, ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
7 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Your phrase as-is is exactly what I'd use. Except I would probably change it to "this," not "it." German-made parts are way too expensive. Taking this into consideration, we ordered Chinese ones. ...
Teacher KSHuang's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

in four months / after four months / four months later

I would use "four months later" here. "After four months" is ok if you have a bit of context. For example, he was sentenced to death. After four months of failed appeals, he was ...
BobRodes's user avatar
  • 15k
6 votes

flew one meter into the air?

"One meter" describes the peak height (skier to ground) of the jump. We don't know how far the skier travelled horizontally in the air before coming down again (but presumably she did travel ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
6 votes

Sentences containing "refused to close his bar because"

He refused to close his bar because of the pandemic. He refused to close his bar because there was a pandemic. He gave the pandemic as a reason for refusing to closing his bar. He refused to close ...
CJ Dennis's user avatar
  • 4,032
5 votes

Usage of 'quick' as adverb

quick can be both adjective and adverb. In spoken language it may be used instead of quickly as an adverb mostly in exclamations or comparatives. Come quick, Larry's on TV Quick! there is a ...
Ahmad's user avatar
  • 8,939
5 votes

Usage of 'quick' as adverb

‘Quick’ (without -ly) is an adverb, as well as an adjective. An adverb does not have to end in -ly and often such adverbs that do not are called ‘flat adverbs’ (see Flat adverbs are flat-out useful). ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
5 votes

"very well above", "so well above", "so much above"

Personally I would say well above and very much above and none of the other options. However, let us take a look at Google Ngrams: It seems like in the past "so much above" was more common, ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
5 votes

How to tell if adverb clauses are essential or not?

The difference is not whether the clause provides information, but whether it changes the information in the rest of the sentence. Your first examples: The package came at 8:30, after you had left. ...
IMSoP's user avatar
  • 4,396
4 votes
Accepted

Usage of 'quick' as adverb

I see quickly as the correct adverb; I would correct my children if they said: He's running quick. However quick is widely used as an adverb, and in some phrases seems to work better: a get ...
djna's user avatar
  • 7,608
4 votes

Is "last two years ago, I was in a classical concert " a correct sentence?

"ago" is used to specify a time point in the past when something happened. Before "ago" you need a time period like "two years" or "10 minutes" to specify how long ago it happend: 5 minutes ago ...
Ahmad's user avatar
  • 8,939
4 votes
Accepted

Why can “bigly” or “big league” become a confusing question?Do they belong to the same part of speech?

I think the whole thing is pretty silly myself -- I thought it was obvious he's been saying "big-league" but not fully enunciating the last G (a fairly common way to pronounce it). I don't think ...
cbh's user avatar
  • 1,759
4 votes
Accepted

Early vs Earlier

Early means 'before a specified or expected time'. earlier also means 'before a specified or expected time' and the specified or expected time can itself be an early time, in which case "earlier" ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
4 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

If you definitely want a single word, then I would go with 'accordingly' - "in a way that is appropriate to the particular circumstances". "German-made parts are way too expensive. Accordingly, we ...
chipples's user avatar
4 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Consider: In light of or similar phrases. From the Macmillan Dictionary because of a particular fact In light of your good driving record, we’ve decided to overlook this offense.
Davo's user avatar
  • 4,130
4 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

The majority of answers are looking to satisfy the original requirement and don't seem to consider sentence order. What you are trying to convey can be said in a single short sentence without archaic ...
charmer's user avatar
  • 241
4 votes

Passive voice in the reduced adverb clauses

Your sentence is grammatical. "Being well-treated" is an introductory participle phrase used as an adjective to describe the subject of the main clause (she). That being said, it is a little bit ...
joiedevivre's user avatar
  • 4,660
4 votes

Does English (proper) allow "sharp ass claws"

It's slang, not 'proper English', but the meaning is very different depending on where you put the hyphen. Sharp-ass claws Its claws are remarkably sharp Sharp ass-claws It has claws in its ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
4 votes

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

The reason one of these sounds awkward and one does not has to do with the what "almost" is doing in each sentence. (I am not talking about formal grammar rules, I don't know those very well....
msouth's user avatar
  • 494
4 votes
Accepted

Why use an adverb in "an arbitrarily large number"

There is no verb. The adverb "arbitrarily" is modifying the adjective "large". Adverbs can modify verbs, but they can also modify adjectives, determiners, or other adverbs. an ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
3 votes

Early vs Earlier

Early as adverb means before the usual or expected time; earlier means before the present time or before the time one is referring to. So, the second sentence could be understood as asking to come ...
apaderno's user avatar
  • 20.9k
3 votes
Accepted

"the way" vs "in the way"

The issue here is that "way" has a large number of meanings. In the first sentence (which by the way is the only one where I could use "in the way" though it tugs at my ears) you have 4 a : ...
DRF's user avatar
  • 1,717

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