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5 votes
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Always Almost or Almost Always?

Yes there is a difference: You nearly burn yourself every time you cook You burn yourself nearly every time you cook So the first means you nearly burn yourself all the time, but it does not ...
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4 votes
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Why use an adverb in "an arbitrarily large number"

There is no verb. The adverb "arbitrarily" is modifying the adjective "large". Adverbs can modify verbs, but they can also modify adjectives, determiners, or other adverbs. an ...
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3 votes

Always Almost or Almost Always?

DialFrost's answer is correct. I'm adding why. As with most adverbs in English, "almost" modifies whatever comes after it. I always [almost burn] myself when I cook. I [almost always] burn ...
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2 votes

Confusion in 'not' sentences

The sentence (1) He didn't play cricket because of Tim can mean either (2) He is playing cricket but not because of Tim (3) Because of Tim he is not playing cricket. If a speaker was saying (1) ...
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2 votes

using real instead of really

It's a very informal usage. Technically, really is an adverb and real is an adjective, but people do use real as an adverb sometimes. You should only use it in very informal contexts, like speaking ...
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2 votes

'very' or 'much' as a modifier for past participle adjectives

Grammatically, “much” can be used as adverb for a participle. What ngram shows is that doing so has been going out of favor, particularly in American English, in written prose for decades. https://...
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2 votes

things to make you anxious

Your example (c) makes perfect sense. Of course you can make people anxious by telling them things. Suppose I wanted to make a person anxious, for some reason, e.g. because I felt like being cruel to ...
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1 vote
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Why isn't 'half' an adjective in this sentence?

You could consider "half" an adjective that modifies "spoon". However, be aware that a determiner is usually the first element in a noun phrase, so it is unusual to put "half&...
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1 vote
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"Sometimes" in different positions

None of them is wrong in any formal sense, and I suspect that, with one exception, all are frequently used. The exception is, as several have commented, #3. It is perhaps more clumsy than the others ...
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1 vote
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Don't occasionally/don't sometimes

No adverbs of frequency can be negated the way you suggest. This is because an adverb of frequency defines how often you do something. When you define how often you don't do something, you are ...
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1 vote

'very' or 'much' as a modifier for past participle adjectives

This is another of those cases where usage has changed over time...
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1 vote
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Can we use existential 'there' and 'there' simply as an adverb of place together?

Yes. Using both types of "there" in the same sentence is acceptable to both native and educated speakers and not redundant. "A cat was there" is grammatically valid, but it shifts ...
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1 vote

Can we use existential 'there' and 'there' simply as an adverb of place together?

There was a cat there sounds 100% natural to me. A cat was there. is grammatical, but less natural, so I would expect it to have some particular connotation: perhaps that the information is surprising,...
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1 vote

How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

Words which are nominally adverbs can also be used to modify adjectives as well as verbs, and in many cases can modify nouns, thus functioning as adjectives. many words in English are not rigidly ...
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1 vote

How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, but adverbs can also modify adjectives, other adverbs, or whole clauses. For example, loudly, slightly, and almost are all adverbs. Here are some examples of ...
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1 vote
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Are "two times" and "twice" interchangeable?

“Twice” is an adverb. I went there twice In the previous sentence, “twice” pertains to the verbal phrase “went there.” “Two times” as a an adverbial phrase is a synonym for “twice.” Sally is twice ...
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1 vote

Do I need "there" in "In my room is a bed"?

I would say that it is grammatical, but not natural, without there. It's grammatical because the fronted locative phrase In my room serves to put the verb is in second place, where it usually needs to ...
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1 vote
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It will be correctly identified vs It will correctly be identified

They are both fine grammatically. Actually, I would tend to use a third form: It will be identified correctly as X. But they all mean the same, and are all perfectly good English.
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