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8

"Sometimes" obviously means some times, so it wouldn't make sense to use that negatively the way your example suggests. When used this way as an adverb of frequency, 'sometimes' sits in the middle between never and always, so you wouldn't just negate it - you'd use a better adverb. "Some" can by default mean 'not all'. For example, "...


2

It's not really "between verbs" in this case because "don't drink" is the negative form of "to drink". Here the construction is negative and sometimes is sort of negative in the sense that it's less of something. For example, you generally can't use rarely or hardly to split the negative construction either. I.e "I don't ...


2

Most people would assume the where if it were omitted. But without it, the two statements: We're heading to the place and you're going to have your next challenge are linked only by implication. In written texts, punctuation would make things clearer. You could describe numerous situations in which the two statements would not be linked at all. Context would ...


1

"Sharply" implies a change in the rate of increase: prices rose sharply on Tuesday Implies that the rate of increase on Tuesday suddenly changed. Whereas "steadily" means the opposite: with no changes in the rate of increase. Thus the two are opposites. Instead of "sharply and steadily" I propose "rapidly": Prices ...


1

"His wishes still haven't come true." This is the usual and correct way of saying it - even though the corresponding affirmative sentence "His wishes still have come true" sounds unusual (at least in British English). "His wishes haven't come true still." This may sometimes be heard - in casual conversation, someone might add ...


1

In your example, it is correct and perfectly idiomatic. In fact, it adds something to the sentence, as "on a voluntary basis" sounds more organised than "voluntarily", and you would expect work to be organised. However, I would not agree that we can make this substitution 'in general'. In fact, structures like this can be overused by ...


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The war had ended [a month or so before]. I finished college [the year before]. "Before" isn't a modifier, so it doesn't modify anything. Modern grammar classifies "before", not as an adverb, but as a preposition. In the above examples, the bracketed elements are PPs (preposition phrases) where the NPs "a month or so" and "...


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Wild monkeys are a problem for many areas in Japan. Every year they cause heavy damage to crops. However, the farmers are fighting back. That should be the correct answer since the word is used to introduce a remark that contrasts with or appears to contradict anything previously said. You can use though since it's synonymous with however, but 'however' is ...


1

This seems to be a UK vs USA English issue. This USA dictionary has else listed as both an adjective and adverb. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/else This makes sense to me. But under this same dictionary's UK definition, "else" is listed as both an adverb (as does the Cambridge dictionary) and as a determiner (which I'm unfamiliar with). so the ...


1

To rephrase more thoroughly it means : Which of your reasons for wanting to work here is most important to you? It is a very standard question on job interviews, and something of a trap as one who is too exuberant about what a valuable employee s/he would be, may be rejected as insincere, and one who explains that the job has the best paycheck available ...


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