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2

In normal speech, I would say A. This is formally ambiguous, (but not in practice). But in writing, I might prefer B, which avoids the ambiguity.


2

In writing, I stayed some days is potentially ambiguous without context. In speech, if you meant on some days and not others you would put a stress on the word some. It rained some days would probably be interpreted as on some days unless you included the word for.


2

I'm not sure what your example would mean, but you can definitely use two adverbs coordinated by "and", for example: This car can get you quickly and economically to your destination. The cook quickly and deftly chopped the vegetables.


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Simply put, subject + be + adverb. From the Cambridge Dictionary Don't worry, I'll be home soon. make it shorter, we get I'll be home. In the example, "I" is the subject, "will be" is the to be verb, home is adverb, as the Dictionary clearly says that. To make a sentence grammatically correct, we just need to construct subject + ...


1

There are two extra words in your second example "even been", although you could just use the word "even" by itself. "Even" is used to show that something is surprising, unusual, unexpected, or extreme. So, the second example is just a list of problems associated with sleeplessness, but the first example which says "it's ...


1

Kshitij. There is a lot to unpack here. First, too: Normally too has a different meaning from very: it is saying that something is in excess. Too afraid (see below) means not just very afraid but more afraid than she should be; afraid to a degree that is wrong or bad in some way. Secondly, normally we qualify adjectives with very or too, not with very/too ...


1

Too and very are not the same. "Too" means "in excess". More than what was wanted or good. "He drove too fast" means that he drove faster than was good for him (e.g., dangerously or illegally). "Very" just amplifies the meaning of the adjective or adverb. "He drove very fast" just means faster than fast, but ...


1

Firstly, why would you need to "find an adverb". If you can understand and communicate effectively, do you need to do this at all? However this doesn't work. At best it can find "Adjuncts", ie words that are not required for the sentence to be grammatically complete. Some adverbs are adjuncts, but so are some adjectives and nouns. ...


1

How would you complete the following sequence, until point 10? I wouldn't I wouldn't even add “secondly” because of the number of points, instead I would divide the list according to urgency or utility. First and foremost, the law must respect… Next the following measures are recommended… (mention the five or six items etc.) After that, (...


1

Theoretically you can go down as many steps as you want. So fourthly, fifthly, sixthly, and so on... However in reality, it gets problematic when the numbers get above fourthly or fifthly. Note that we are talking about the ordinal numbers intrinsically (first, second, third...), and ordinal numbers can be both used as adjectives and adverbs. So the -ly ...


1

You can either say, "That's exactly why" or "For that exact reason". "That's the exactly reason why" is incorrect way of expressing because it doesn't make any sense in English language. "For this/that very reason" is pretty much similar to which we have discussed above.


1

Yes, you can use those phrases like that. It might be clearer if you separate the time phrases: "Ten years ago, I lived on a small island for one year." (Note that usually, one says "on" an island, not "in".)


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