Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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10

Adverbial "home" works like other little words in English that follow a word for a motion and indicate the destination of that motion. There is no standard term in common use for these words, but it would be reasonable to call them destination particles.* Here are some examples: Be sure to take the trash out tonight. Next, we should carry the couch ...


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When you say "at home" you are specifying where you are, or where an action is taking place: I write at home. I study at home. I work at home. All of these mean that you are carrying out the action indicated by the verb (write/study/work) whilst in your own home. "Go home" and "write home" idiomatically mean that you are writing to your home address,...


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Yes, "I get tired quickly" is perfectly good English, as is "I get tired easily." Each has a slightly different meaning, so the best choice would depend on your intended meaning. "I get tired quickly" emphasizes the amount of time that it takes for you to get tired, perhaps while engaged in a specific activity mentioned in the context, such as walking or ...


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It is Kubernetes terminology. Understanding Kubernetes will help you understand declaratively because airship is leveraging on Kubernetes technology. Kubernetes (K8s) is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. It groups containers that make up an application into logical units for easy ...


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"Potentially" is an adverb; so, if someone or something is potentially good, that means they have the potential to be good. The adverb operates on the adjective "good". "Potential", in this context, would be an adjective. Saying someone is "a potential good candidate" would mean that they are both potential and good. It would be the same as saying they are "...


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No - when speaking about time and dates, "from" usually means "any time after", for example: You can arrive from 1pm. (this means you can arrive any time after 1pm) If you actually mean to say that they should have exactly 10 days rehearsal time then you should simply say: You should start rehearsals ten days ahead of the play. Or, if you are saying ...


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You're right to wonder what they're talking about. Here's what they're trying to point out. In this sentence: Now that I'm married, I don't go out in the evenings so much. the word now introduces a subordinate clause: "I'm married". The phrase now that functions like "because" (also a conjunction). In British English, people sometimes drop the that, but ...


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You would put "often" at the end of the sentence, like you did in your example. "I used to go skiing in the winter often." Or perhaps even better would be: "I used to go skiing often in the winter."


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If so, is there a difference in meaning between "You always can trust me" and "You can always trust me"? I believe there is, because in the second sentence, "always" modifies "trust", unlike in the first sentence. You asked if there is a difference in meaning between them. But then you say the position of "always" is the difference - that is not a ...


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Actually they are quite different, and you could even use both in your example sentence: Each chair leg is individually joined to the seat by screws. "Each" is used to refer to multiple things, which are regarded and identified separately. It can group those individual things together, for example, "each day I go to work" is referring to every day that ...


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I don't believe "quickly" is wrong, but "easily" is definitely more common. "Quickly" implies that it is the time that is tiring you, rather than with "easily" it is the effort that tires you.


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A comma can be used to separate clauses in the same sentence. It doesn't always go after the word "therefore". One of the most famous quotes containing the word is: I think, therefore I am. "Therefore" is a conjunctive adverb that you can use as a transition word in sentences and paragraphs. In your example, it begins a sentence, so there must have been ...


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