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3

Think of a similar sentence: They've kept a story secret for a decade. The grammar here is clearly explained by the dictionary, just under "keep": the verb is used "with object and complement". The object is "a story" and "secret" is an object complement because it describes the object. An object complement can be an adjective, a noun, or a phrase that ...


2

unjustly would work: characterized by injustice : unfair // The convict received an unjust sentence. (source: Merriam-Webster) That doesn't really help you if you don't know what injustice means: absence of justice : violation of right or of the rights of another : unfairness


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"Wrongfully" would be the word I'd expect in the first sentence; possibly "erroneously", but I think wrongfully is more common for false imprisonment. https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/wrongfully


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I believe that examples a, b, and c should all use a semi colon. They could, after all, be recast as separate sentences. However, you will see such forms used with a comma or no punctuation at all rather often. Note that in each case "however" could be substituted for 'nevertheless" with little or no change of meaning. In both examples d and e I would ...


2

No; that would entirely change the meaning of the sentence, from saying you are never going to yield to saying you are never determined. It would be like changing I am certain I will never win. to I am never certain I will win. Think of "never" as meaning "not ever" (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/never) - then you want to say that you ...


2

The use of “then” here is an adjective, and sounds better before the verb. They’re both pretty much the same as far as meaning goes. Also, other ways you can say this: “The king reigning during that time” “The king reigning at that time”


2

The first one is actually correct. Here, "throw" is acting as a noun, so you want the adjective (good) rather than the adverb. Your hint here is "your," which always comes before nouns. Another way to think about is "Your action is good." Action is always a noun, so obviously it uses the adjective. And a throw is a specific action.


2

It's an adjective here. Compare the following, which have the same structure: It's a story they've kept private for a decade It's a story they made public a long time ago It's a machine they've kept clean for a decade First definition from OED: secret A. adj. 1. Kept from knowledge or observation; hidden, concealed. a. Predicatively (esp. in to keep ...


1

You have to be careful with songs because the lyrics are often poetic or figurative. They aren't literal so it might be hard for anybody to understand what they mean. When an adverb like 'away' is added to a verb like 'slide' it sometimes gives the direction of the motion of the verb. 'Slide away' means to slide farther in any direction from something. '...


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"Continue to" Without still, the sentence would have a slightly different meaning. The students could have once demonstrated proficiency and therefore would qualify. Still implies they need an ongoing proficiency. Please see the adverb definition in the OED for more info/examples.


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"The door burst open and in they came." This is inversion - the reversal of a normal order of words. It makes the sentence sound more emphatic and emotional. It's absolutely correct. Do you remember the famous song "Here Comes the Sun" by The Beatles? Well, the sentence is just as correct as "she sun comes here," but it puts more emphasis on "here." If you ...


1

His influence is greater. Greater is an adjective. His influence is greater than ever. Ever is modifying greater. (And than ever is an adverbial phrase.) If you drop the use of than, and rephrase the sentence slightly, this will be even more apparent (even if it does subtly change the meaning of the sentence): His influence is ever greater.


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"Recently, my imagination has been working badly" seems to be more appropriate, for the already mentioned reason that it is generally used with present/past perfect tenses. As for the second question, "I've already finished" sounds more appropriate.


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It depends what you mean The CEO only discussed the new venture with his manager. This would normally mean the CEO did not discuss the new venture with anyone else. (The manager could well have talked to others about it, or had no other conversations at all) A second more obscure meaning could be that it was only a discussion, rather than an actual solid ...


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The correct form is "... how they ever lived without them." Saying "... how the lived ever without them." is incorrect syntax.


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You are right that He goes to church on Sunday is the more common way to phrase this sentence; however, He goes on Sunday to church is not incorrect. Changing the order changes the emphasis, so moving the indication of time draws attention to it. This is particularly useful in making parallel constructions: He goes on Sunday to church, and on Monday ...


1

He goes to Church on Sunday... Using "... on Sundays..." is also acceptable. You can also say, with a change of emphasis "On Sunday, he goes to church..." or "He goes to church and sits with his boys on Sunday".


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It doesn't have the sense of "throughout a period", much more "in its entirety". The OED gives several very closely related uses, earliest from the 1400s. With a preceding numeral adverb, expressing repetition He read it twice over over again: a second time: This is the old, old song over again. over and over: repeatedly, many times over. Also over and ...


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likely modifies those; most modifies likely; to get ahead… depends on likely, so likely cannot modify it. Your two paraphrases are nearly equivalent in meaning.


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The phrase clean up after itself means: [Merriam-Webster] : to make a place clean after it has been left dirty or messy by (someone) // His mother is always cleaning up after him. // You should learn to clean up after yourself. The use of up can be used as an intensifier—and it's defined as an adverb in this sense: 6 b —used as an intensifier /...


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