Hot answers tagged

58 votes
Accepted

What adverb could I use before "apologizing" to mean "a lot"?

The word you are looking for is profusely. Adverb profusely (comparative more profusely, superlative most profusely) In great quantity or abundance; in a profuse manner. The run left him sweating ...
Richard Winters's user avatar
30 votes

I will grab a taxi back. vs. I will grab back a taxi

I will grab a taxi back means that you intend to hail a taxi for your return journey. I will grab back a taxi is not an alternative way of saying the above. 'Grab back' sounds like someone has taken ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 96k
26 votes

In the phrase "there's a good film on late", does "on" mean "on TV"?

In this sentence "on" is not short for "on TV". Here it means "scheduled". It is the same use of "on" as in "What have you got on tonight? - I have a ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 6,115
25 votes

Why do we say 'aim high' instead of 'aim highly'?

"Aim high" isn't telling you in what manner to aim, but where to aim. "Aim high, above the basket, in order to have the basketball reach the basket." "Aim carefully" ...
David Peel's user avatar
12 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

As a native speaker (Manchester, North England) with a reasonable bit of public speaking experience, I actually think it would be best to avoid trying this compliment altogether. "Off the cuff&...
roganjosh's user avatar
  • 271
12 votes

Why do we say 'aim high' instead of 'aim highly'?

It's not an idiom, it's just a directional phrase, similar to "turn left", "go West", or "look up". Here, "high" is indeed an adverb, acting as a direction; you ...
JounceCracklePop's user avatar
11 votes

I will grab a taxi back. vs. I will grab back a taxi

Astralbee's answer is correct. I'll add the reasons. In the first sentence, "grab" is the main verb, and the direct object is "a taxi". The word "back" is an adverbial ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 48.8k
11 votes
Accepted

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

While I don't think there's an idiom specifically for speaking with notes but largely independent of them, it would sound natural to compliment them for the ways that doing so improved their speech. ...
Radvylf Programs's user avatar
9 votes

What adverb could I use before "apologizing" to mean "a lot"?

You could just say I was deeply apologetic
hulio_entredas's user avatar
9 votes

Why do we say 'aim high' instead of 'aim highly'?

It's idiomatic, one of a family of idioms including "think big", "act bold" and (perhaps) "try hard", in which the word "high/big/hard" serves figuratively in ...
James K's user avatar
  • 202k
8 votes

I will grab a taxi back. vs. I will grab back a taxi

"I will grab a taxi back" means that you plan to take a taxi to return home or to your starting point after completing an activity. "I will grab back a taxi", on the other hand, is ...
Shayan Poursadeghi's user avatar
8 votes

I will grab a taxi back. vs. I will grab back a taxi

gotube's post is still wrong (after the edit). Adverbials can certainly come between a verb and its direct object. (The contrary claim has now been removed from that post.) But it is still wrong to ...
user21820's user avatar
  • 1,365
7 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

We would normally only mention notes or cards if they were not used, to praise someone for that. For example 'he spoke without notes'. If someone spoke mostly without notes, we could say that. If ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
7 votes

adjective (happy) or adverb (happily)

Your example would be My parents are very happily married. Because that is the common form of that phrase and happily is the adverb form. But, nuance.... My parents are very happy married. works ...
DTRT's user avatar
  • 5,024
6 votes
Accepted

Are sentences containing "never" affirmative or negative?

Never is a negative polarity indicator. This can easily be verified by adding a confirmatory tag question to the sentence: I have never seen Singapore, have I? I have never seen Singapore, *haven't I?...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 2,208
6 votes
Accepted

What is happening in the sentence "He stood, brazenly naked,"

Despite the name, adverbs are not only for verbs: An adverb is a word or an expression that generally modifies a verb, adjective, another adverb, determiner, clause, preposition, or sentence.
dubious's user avatar
  • 922
6 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

Another choice might be to compliment the speaker for “sounding natural.” “Natural” is the opposite of sounding stilted or overly-rehearsed. If you tell a speaker that they “sounded really natural up ...
Angelica Barberry's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

adjective (happy) or adverb (happily)

You should use "happily". This adverb modifies the adjective "married". Adjectives modify nouns; adverbs modify verbs, adjectives and other structures. So you need an adverb ...
James K's user avatar
  • 202k
5 votes

dead/deadly serious - sure

Dead used in this way is informal, and is an intensifier. It does not mean the same as deadly. It happens that, because of the meaning of serious, dead serious and deadly serious overlap; but they are ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 73.7k
5 votes

Questions on "can go so far"?

Many English adverbs are quite flexible about their position within an utterance, and only is certainly no exception in this respect. Strictly speaking, since only modifies so far (not go), OP's ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How many adverbs are allowed?

There's no imposed limit on the number of adverbs you can use in the same way that there is no limit on the number of adjectives you can use. A beautiful, big, red flower. He suddenly ran, quickly ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 96k
5 votes

What adverb could I use before "apologizing" to mean "a lot"?

Try synonyms for effusively, abjectly, obsequiously, etc. Rather than an adverb, I might also use an adjective, or a different verb to express the same idea, e.g., I groveled, apologizing to them. I ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
5 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

There's no commonly understood idiomatic expression that indicates a compliment for speaking well without looking at notes. The closest I can think of would be to say, "You spoke well, and you ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 48.8k
5 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

As you suspect, the phrase "speak freely" means "speak frankly and openly," and the phrase "speak without notes" implies that the speaker didn't use any written materials ...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,672
4 votes

What does 'ever' modify?

Short answer - it modifies 'first'. It is very common to say something is the 'first ever' to make it clear that it is the absolute first. For example, what would you think if someone asked "what ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 96k
4 votes

What does "to speak without notes" imply when giving praise to a speaker?

I would say that the speaker gave the speech or presentation "by memory" or "from memory". Carol gave an excellent presentation and even delivered it almost entirely from memory. ...
David's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

Question about adverbs and what they modify

'Always' is qualifying the copular independent clause (here, also the matrix sentence) 'I am hungry'; this is a typical adverbial usage. It adds temporal detail to the statement 'I am hungry'. It ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

Which one is correct? "decide suddenly to stop" or "decide to suddenly stop"

In the first you "suddenly stop". In the second you "decide suddenly". So the adverb modifies a different verb. The two verbs are chained together, so we understand that a sudden ...
James K's user avatar
  • 202k
4 votes
Accepted

"The layer of haze starts out tenuous": why not "tenuously"?

An adjective can be a "subject complement". If I say "The elephant looks big," then big tells us something about the elephant, not its eyesight. In this case, "tenuous" ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 10.1k
3 votes
Accepted

a question about "as". is it a typo of "is"?

It is not a typo. This meaning of as is probably best defined as "in a particular way or form". They rated the toffee in some way; in what way? as being more bitter (etc.) As is the the ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible