Hot answers tagged

27

This seems to be a mistake. The original documentation, from 2013, reads: The World Wide Web was built over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). A User Agent, like a web browser, uses HTTP to request a HTML document. The browser then formats and displays the document to its user. HTTP is used to ...


10

Adverbial "home" works like other little words in English that follow a word for a motion and indicate the destination of that motion. There is no standard term in common use for these words, but it would be reasonable to call them destination particles.* Here are some examples: Be sure to take the trash out tonight. Next, we should carry the couch ...


8

Firstly, it’s “than” not “then”. Secondly, neither are correct, with the second one being particularly wrong in its placement of “rather”. The first one at least sort of sounds like it’s trying to say: Men are rather impressed by beauty. “Rather” here just means “very”. I imagine what you are trying to say is: Men are impressed by beauty rather than (by) ...


7

That's not idiomatic. The main reason is because when you talk about passing something (or its opposite, failing), it's an either-or matter. You either passed the exams or didn't. Using well to describe "how much" you passed the exams doesn't make a lot of sense. If you really want to talk about "how well" you performed or did your exams, you can say: ...


6

When you say "at home" you are specifying where you are, or where an action is taking place: I write at home. I study at home. I work at home. All of these mean that you are carrying out the action indicated by the verb (write/study/work) whilst in your own home. "Go home" and "write home" idiomatically mean that you are writing to your home address,...


5

Any more (two words) can be used as: (A) an adverb about quantities or numbers - is there any more beer? Have you seen any more birds? Used like this, it means roughly the same as 'some more'. (B) also an adverb, meaning 'no longer' or 'in the past but not now'. In this meaning, we use it in the end position - I don't drink tea any more, bus tickets are ...


5

It's almost a trick question because neither sentence in the question is grammatical. The verb responding requires modification by adverbs, not adjectives. The sentence can be simplified like this: ✘ The private sector is responding proactive. ✔ The private sector is responding proactively. ✘ The private sector is responding concurrent. ✔ The ...


4

"Come to" is a phrasal verb which means "to become conscious again after an injury or medical operation". come to phrasal verb with come ​ to become conscious again after an accident or operation: Has he come to yet? Come to (Cambridge Dictionary) In English, a phrasal verb is a phrase such as turn down or ran into which ...


4

It's a sentence adverb: American Heritage Dictionary "sentence adverb" "An adverb or adverbial phrase that modifies an entire sentence, especially in establishing the attitude of the speaker or writer, as thankfully in Thankfully, there was enough for everyone."


4

These sentences do not mean the same thing to me. There is a different nuance with regards to whether Jim has been in the city for years or whether he has simply been around the city for years. I will comment separately on each sentence. 1. Jim had been in Washington for years, and knew all the right people. The sentence tells me Jim has lived and worked ...


4

The quote seems to be in error, until you check a dictionary: "8. (archaic) Not yet brought forward, produced, or exhibited to view; out of sight; remaining." "Yet to be revealed", "yet to come", or as you suggested "ahead", would make more sense in modern English.


3

Using "from" in the examples you provided is confusing, it creates ambiguity. For starters, the phrase "away from" is commonly used to measure distance, not time. So examples a and c are dismissed. Regarding b and d, it's not conclusive whether we are talking about a point of time before or after graduation. Say we are in the year 2019 and graduation was on ...


3

An adverb can modify a verb, or another adverb, or an entire sentence or clause. Since the concept of "counterintuitive" involves both what happened and what someone would expect to have happened, and the conflict between the two ideas, the meaning of the whole thing is a little bit complex, and the adverb is frequently used to modify whole sentences and ...


3

Yes, "I get tired quickly" is perfectly good English, as is "I get tired easily." Each has a slightly different meaning, so the best choice would depend on your intended meaning. "I get tired quickly" emphasizes the amount of time that it takes for you to get tired, perhaps while engaged in a specific activity mentioned in the context, such as walking or ...


3

The word just has a range of meanings - the one applicable to OP's cited context is as per this definition in Merriam-Webster... just 2a: by a very small margin : BARELY Example usage: just too late Hence just down the road means down the road, but not very far down the road (i.e. - nearby). Note that it's pretty arbitrary whether the place is up, ...


3

... a no less firmly established boundary, - a boundary which is at least as firmly established. It is similar to the Maths "not less than" which is mathematically the same as "greater than or equal to".


2

"Well before" is "before", and not just "before", but "quite a bit before", or "significantly before." In other words, there was enough time between the idea for the book and the storyline, that there can be no doubt which came first.


2

I have added some brackets to show how to group the words: (My (previous (good computer))) cost me $500. In the past I owned a good computer, and it cost $500. The adjective "previous" modifies "good computer". (My ((previously good) computer)) cost me $500. In an unspecified time (but probably the present), I own or owned a computer which cost $500....


2

"My previous good computer [...]" means "the good computer I owned before my current good computer". "My previously good computer [...]" means "my computer which used to be good but is no longer so". I hope this helps.


2

It is Kubernetes terminology. Understanding Kubernetes will help you understand declaratively because airship is leveraging on Kubernetes technology. Kubernetes (K8s) is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. It groups containers that make up an application into logical units for easy ...


2

Not an English expert in any way but I would like to put my two cents in. "In during" sounds plainly wrong, what I would use instead is "while". In your first example: "I was headed to the library while talking to my mom on the phone." In your second example: "I was waiting for Judy in the lobby while talking to my mom on the phone." Also, this may not ...


2

ran over him ... is the correct form. "To run over" is a verb phrase, and therefore, is best kept as is. There are cases where you can add words in the middle but this isn't one.


2

The phrase "up your bottom" is a standard phrase, perhaps an idiom, in UK English for "inserted anally". The phrase "up your rear" is perhaps more common in US English. Compare "up the spout" for a bullet in the chamber of a gun, ready to fire (although this phrase has other senses as well). As with many other idioms, the phrase is not entirely logical, ...


2

Given I am X, what's valid for X is in almost all cases is the following: an adjective (I am hot, I am third, I am ready) a noun or pronoun (I am a cat, I am a worker, I am him, I am George) a verb's present participle form, these always end in -ing (I am walking ..., I am envying ...) a verb's past participle form if it makes sense to express a state and ...


2

Your example makes better use of "other": Sorry, I just meant something I observe in other discussions, not in our past topics But in other contexts, you can use other adjectives. See below: In the different discussions that I had, I noticed... During the various discussions in the past... You may even use "elsewhere", but with a different word ...


2

The top voted reply on HiNative is spot on: Really is used much more often. Truly is higher register. Truly has more emphasis. I have two more to add to this: Truly sounds more heartfelt: Truly you’re a great friend. Truly can sound pretentious if you’re speaking casually. Really doesn’t have this problem: This is fine: This music really is loud! ...


2

The word late, doesn't mean "till a later time." More accurately, it means "after the desired time." "The plane's depature is late" is no guarantee it will leave at a later time. It just means "The plane's departure is after the desired time." Using your examples I worked past the desired time at work today. He stayed up past the desired time ...


2

"On the other hand" is used as a form of contrasting two different issues or two different benefits. "This option is good but the other option is also good," or "This option is bad but the other option is also bad." It gives no preference to either option; that is entirely determined by what the options are. If we leave for vacation today, we can meet up ...


2

They're both correct and perfectly ordinary English. English allows a lot of flexibility in the placement of prepositional phrases and adverbs in general. Here are some variations, which are also grammatical: Yesterday, we met each other by chance in the subway. Yesterday in the subway, we met each other by chance. In the subway yesterday, we ...


2

Since whole modifies the noun week, it is an adjective (but see below about determiners). Here are other sentences with an adjective modifying week: It rained all of last week except on Sunday. It rained twice during that unpleasant week. Adverbs modify anything other than a noun: a verb, an adjective, a preposition, another adverb, or a whole ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible