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It's a fairly poetic phrasing, so it can sound a bit strange! You could think of it as putting more emphasis on what you're always listening to, rather than the act of always listening, but the word order the author's using suggests it's just their writing style (see also "best be rewarded", "strive instead").


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There is an old "rule" of style not to separate "to" and the verb in an infinitive. It is NOT a rule of grammar. Nor, in my opinion, is it a universally valid guide to good style. Personally, I do tend to avoid "splitting infinitives" because I like to emphasize the verb as you mentioned. Moreover, it makes me think about what ...


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Good is and has always been an adjective. It is used as an adverb colloquially by those who do not understand grammar.


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Yes, tirelessly is a verb. Both of them are absolutely correct. Although people prefer using the adverb before the verb. If an adverb strongly modifies the main verb, put it before the main verb, not after the first helping verb (in a compound verb with three or more words. A verb is a word for an action or a state of being. An adverb is a word used to ...


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Namely is followed by something more specific or more precise than what came before. Presumably a Siberian husky isn't the only type of wolf-like dog, but even if it were, the species name would still be a more precise way of expressing what you were referring to. So: John bought a wolf-like dog, namely a Siberian husky is correct, but John bought a ...


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The adverb is close in that sentence. It is not immediately after, but in warnings against putting adverbs far from the word that they modify, the intent is to warn against lack of clarity, because the adverb can not be connected to the proper word by the reader. Far means something more like He ate the cake, which was chocolate with strawberry frosting ...


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Despite their name, adverbs don't have to modify verbs; they can modify other parts of the sentence. Lexico defines an adverb as follows: A word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group, expressing a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, degree, etc. You are correct about this sentence: The ...


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The word closed is an adjective, describing the state of your nose after pinching. The structure is called resultative: Wikipedia "resulative" "In linguistics, a resultative (abbreviated RES) is a form that expresses that something or someone has undergone a change in state as the result of the completion of an event. Resultatives appear as ...


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To me, "enough" is less intense than "very". It means that a threshold is reached, but doesn't go beyond that. Here is a definition: Merriam-Webster "enough" adverb 1 in or to a degree or quantity that satisfies or that is sufficient or necessary for satisfaction : sufficiently 2 fully, quite he is qualified enough for the ...


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We don't know the style of these cheat sheets, but both comments could be understood to mean: There *should be* no comma after "trained" which, as I think you know, is debatable. If the comments are simply intended to point out the absence of the second commas, it might have been clearer to say "Two commas" and "One comma", or &...


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I'm sorry, I do not see a "there is," in any of the example sentences. If you are referring to the Oxford Comma, (comma used before "and"), the sentence is valid regardless of whether or not the comma is in place or not. Personally, I use the Oxford Comma wherever possible, as the sentence tends to flow more smoothly.


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They don't mean quite the same thing. "We don't often try to make this dish". This means that our attempts to make this dish are infrequent, without any particular sentiment about that. "We try not to make this dish often." This means that we deliberately try not to make the dish frequently. That expresses a slight negative sentiment ...


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She is much liked by everybody. The degree AdvP "much" indicates that "liked" is an adjective here. If it was a verb, the active counterpart would be the ungrammatical *"Everybody much likes her". The clause does have a by phrase with "everybody", but such phrases are permitted in adjectival passives when the meaning ...


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A 'participle' is a verb form that is nonfinite and an adjective or adverb. So, "liked" is certainly both a "participle verb form" and a "participle adjective" as well! Those can both be true, and are both true in this sentence. "Liked" is /not/ a finite verb form here, and 'everybody' is not its subject! This is a ...


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