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To be clear, in principle: First example: Either - I don't like apples and I don't like oranges either. The speaker is stating that s/he doesn't like either apples or oranges. Second example: Too A: >I don't like oranges. B: >I too don't like oranges. Speaker B is agreeing with Speaker A that s/he doesn't like oranges. In practice, many people would ...


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Too, As Well, and Also are usually used in positive sentences. The only difference is in their placement in the sentence. Too and as well are used at the end of a sentence. (As well is more formal than too). Also usually goes before the verb or adjective. Example: She likes movies. I like movies too I also like movies I like movies as well. To express an ...


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"But me" means "except for me". So, you need not use 'else' to exclude 'me' from 'no one' in your example : "She has no one else to look after her but me." (Here, 'else' is unnecessary.) Your second sentence is okay : "She has no one to look after her but me." Or, you could also say : "She has none but me to look after her."


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Both are correct. "No one else" means no one, but with some person or group excluded. If that person or group is explicitly stated, it's redundant, but not wrong. Likewise, making a comparison implicitly excludes whatever you're comparing the rest to. So when is it necessary? Usually when the exception has already been specified and needn't be repeated. ...


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Your first sentence is okay. John is my best friend. No one likes me more than he does. You need not write No one else to exclude John from No one because "John likes me more than he (John) likes me" sounds unnatural and impossible. But John is my best friend. No one else likes me as much as he does. Here, You need to write No one else to exclude ...


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"But" can be used as a preposition in the sense of "except" : "She has no one to look after her but/except me." Therefore, both your examples are okay & interchangeable.


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"Also" can work perfectly well, but with a different meaning: you have previously stated an object clause and are adding another object clause to the action of the subject and verb: (You) I don't know who they are. (You) I also don't understand why they're here. In contrast, "either" can apply a previously-stated action to a new subject: (...


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Both of the sentences are grammatical. The only difference is a matter of style, and which is more common than the other. If you can end a sentence with too (and you can), you can also end a sentence with also. ✔ I like it too. ✔ I like coffee, and tea too. ✔ I like it also. ✔ I like coffee, and tea also. In my examples, I've also added a comma before ...


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She also found her money along with her bag.


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I can’t tell you why, but as a native speaker the second sounds natural and the first sounds wrong. “I’m going to the store and also the pharmacy” “She likes to swim and also ride her bike” It seems like also needs to come before the second thing you’re taking about.


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General rule: Above: It's usually used for positions. Example: The village is well above sea level. Over: It's usually used for number or time. Example: a. I have been waiting for over an hour. b. I got over ten likes on this answer. Other cases: If over is used for position, it means the directly above. But above can be directly or left or right above ...


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The short answer is yes. There is a subtle distinction between: You show more devotion to me than (to) him and You show devotion to me more than (to) him. The first sentence refers to more devotion (a greater amount); the second implies more often. The use of the preposition to is optional. In colloquial speech it would often be omitted. It's clear ...


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"...which will be ended as more time elapses." is better than "...which will be ended as more time will elapse." The difference is that the latter has two future tense clauses occur supporting the independent clause.


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The difference between your two examples isn't the choice of adverb, but the fact that your first example has a transitive verb and a direct object. You shouldn't put an adverb between a verb and its direct object. Note that we can use "carefully" in your second example sentences: You can't work carefully for six hours without a break!" The teachers ...


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It's almost a trick question because neither sentence in the question is grammatical. The verb responding requires modification by adverbs, not adjectives. The sentence can be simplified like this: ✘ The private sector is responding proactive. ✔ The private sector is responding proactively. ✘ The private sector is responding concurrent. ✔ The ...


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The word just has a range of meanings - the one applicable to OP's cited context is as per this definition in Merriam-Webster... just 2a: by a very small margin : BARELY Example usage: just too late Hence just down the road means down the road, but not very far down the road (i.e. - nearby). Note that it's pretty arbitrary whether the place is up, ...


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In this sentence, the cafe is on the same street, not too far away. The phrase is down the street meaning further along the street that you are on. And the just means something like a little, though in some situations it might be used more to emphasize that it's easy to get to the place, rather than a reference to distance.


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Adverbs of indefinite frequency such as "always" go before a main verb, between an auxiliary verb and main verb, and after the verb to be. However, there are always exceptions to the general rules regarding the position of adverbs, depending on what the speaker is emphasising.


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We don't use prepositions before a number of common time expressions beginning with next, last, this, one etc. I met him on Friday. ✔️ I met him on last Friday. ❌ I met him on Friday last. ✔️


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These sentences do not mean the same thing to me. There is a different nuance with regards to whether Jim has been in the city for years or whether he has simply been around the city for years. I will comment separately on each sentence. 1. Jim had been in Washington for years, and knew all the right people. The sentence tells me Jim has lived and worked ...


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The "up" does change the meaning and the "feeling" of the expression. "Up" tends to indicate "completeness" "Buckle" (without an "up") sounds like a command from an Army Sergeant. It doesn't fit the situation of a driver giving a friendly reminder to a passenger. "Snuggle up" sounds warm and friendly. You could snuggle up with your children in front of ...


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From this discussion, we can draw the following conclusion: 'About to" implies "IMMEDIACY". "The man is about to die" means "The man is on the verge of death : he will die immediately. But "The man is going to die", here, means that there are certain present situation or evidence on the basis of which you can PREDICT that he will die quite soon . Michael ...


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"About to" implies immediacy. "Going to" could be any time in the future. We are all going to die. Not all of us are about to die.


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The "again" at the end emphasises the repetitiveness (repetition). other examples: - "over and over and over ... again" (both the repeated use of over and the addition of again) - "forever and ever. Amen" (prayer)


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We say bow-wow in English. It's one of those standard expressions imitating the sounds of animals (which are different in every language!), but we usually use them with says. The dog barks, or says bow-wow. The cat mews, or says meow. The cow lows, or says moo...and so on.


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I don't see any adverbs in the examples you give. For example, can we say "the dog barks bow-gow" and "The baby cries wah-wah"? Sounds of animals like a cat's "meow" are often verbs themselves. For example, you might say "the cat meowed". In your examples though, you are using a verb, followed by a sound. "The dog barks bow-wow" is like saying "The man ...


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Here is a nice article from the Cambridge Dictionary which explains the reason. In short, you don't use "so" before an adjective and a noun, as is your case with "strange situation". There are a few different ways to paraphrase this sentence to make it work: I hope you are doing well in this very strange situation. I hope you are doing well in such ...


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