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Grammarly has an interesting piece on this subject Place adverbs as close as possible to the words they are supposed to modify. Putting the adverb in the wrong spot can produce an awkward sentence at best and completely change the meaning at worst. Be especially careful about the word only, which is one of the most often misplaced modifiers. Consider the ...


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"So far" indicates a progress report. So far I have sent my resume to 15 possible employers, but I haven't found a job. "Still" gives emphasis that something is true despite a circumstance or expectation that it might not be. This could be time, as in your example - I still haven't found a job. It could be something else, which is often ...


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An adverb is used to modify a verb, whereas an adjective is used to modify a noun. This is one of those situations in English, where native speakers often do not follow correct grammar rules. "He did greatly." is technically correct, but it is not idiomatic. Instead, one would say "He did well" (well is the adverbial form of "good&...


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Still implies more impatience. So far is just stating the fact: I haven't found a job yet. Still comes across as: I haven't found a job yet (and I wish I had!)


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There is a subtle difference in connotations. The first sentence suggests continuing, and the second sentence suggests competition. "Already" is a tricky one to parse. To borrow Kate's sentence "I've been to Spain five times already", it means very different things when you just told me you're going to Spain or Italy.


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I think already carries the implication that you expect to have the experience again, or that having had it is a reason for not needing to have it again. The pharmacy supplied me with twenty tablets, and I've already taken five. I had a lovely holiday in Spain. I've been there five times now. I think I shall go to Italy next year. I've been to Spain five ...


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You could use either in this case, but there are slight differences between them. "Carefully" means with care (i.e. ensuring the task is done well). It often implies with caution or awareness. "Cautiously" means with caution or awareness (i.e. attention to one's surroundings and the task at hand) and often implies reservation and care.


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Both are correct. transfer can be a noun or a verb, and this affects how it is used. In the first sentence, transfer is a noun. You can tell that because it's preceded by the possessive determiner her. Because it's a noun, the preposition for is required. Here is another noun example: You need a mental break and you need more time to prepare for the ...


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There are times when you can say 'a half'... he ate 'a half of an orange'; where the 'half' ends up being a quanity. But in your example the difference is this: when you cut something in half you end up with two halves. You 'halve' it. And taking 'half' of the result is the natural end of that operation. But when you cut something in quarters you take one of ...


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I wasn't treated fairly, but then (again) it's life. If you think about it more or from a different perspective, it will make more sense. If you believe that the world we live in doesn't always seem to be fair, then you, who were treated badly, is a just another example of this belief.


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Both are correct: In fact, all of the following are correct. What would you do if you lost your job? What would you do if you lost your job next week? What will you do if you lose your job? What will you do if you lose your job next week?


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Yes, without the "over" it sounds odd. I can't quite put my finger on why. Just plain "goes" suggests (to me) a kind of directness that would be inappropriate in a casual bar get-aquainted scenario. If Mary were the suspect in a murder mystery and Alan the detective, his seeing her would have some implications, and he might then just go ...


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In It is passed directly ... the "directly" is an adverb telling you how it is passed, so an adverb modifying the verb. In It is passed unmodified the "ummodified" is an adjective telling you about it, so an adjective. There's no grammatical reason to object to placing it after the verb. I wouldn't want to read about passing it ...


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Yes. Both sentences are correct. Note that the style, especially of (1) is somewhat formal. However that is not a problem considering the sentiment conveyed.


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Could you tell me if it is correct and natural to say don't do something nearly as someone? No. You have omitted "much" "... don't do something nearly as much as someone" is correct. For example: Sara doesn't eat nearly as much sugar as you. Yes. That is correct.


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The correct positive response to "how are you doing" is "I am doing well". Often people will say "I'm good", which is idiomatic but probably not strictly speaking grammatical. The negative response, then, would be "I am doing badly". Contrary to U11-Forward's answer, this is perfectly correct and understandable. "...


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The first one is correct. It says "I am doing bad". When you feel good you would say "I am doing good", it's an exact opposite of "I am doing bad". Saying "I am doing badly" would sound strange. As the mentioned in the Dictionary, the meaning of "badly" is: in an unsatisfactory, inadequate, or unsuccessful ...


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Science is a subject such as physics, chemistry, and biology. I would say "According to an official statistics of the Transportation Department, white clothing was effective to help to avoid car accidents."


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You could possibly use other adverbs in your examples, but not 'scientifically' the way that you have. 'Scientifically' means by means of scientific methods and principles. Your examples make no reference to scientific processes. You could possibly say something like: Wearing white is scientifically proven to help to avoid car accidents. ...although I'm ...


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In this case, "however" is used to introduce a concept that might be surprising or contrary to expectations based on the earlier text. The paragraph discusses the rise in popularity of sneakers in the 1920's, explaining that these two brothers each started shoe companies (which we know were successful, as the brands are still around today) and ...


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The word "however" simply indicates a contrast with the previous sentence. "As new athletic shoes were developed, people around the world began to use them for many different sports. It wasn't until the 1950s, however, that tennis shoes became popular as a fashion statement outside of any connection with athletics. This can equally well be ...


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I believe your question arises from the concept that you are considering a scale of earnings that has a direction, starting from zero and proceeding upwards. From that viewpoint, earnings of almost three times are less than three times. In the same way, on a journey, as we approach our destination, we may say that we are almost there. This interpretation is ...


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Generally, the summery in the question is good. However "a little" can also be used to modify a noun, with a meaning of "a small amount". In this use it is an adjective, not an adverb. For example I take a little sugar in my tea. I needed a little time to learn the process. The phrase "kind of" can al;so be placed after a ...


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While English is usually very strict about word order, when it comes to adverbs and the verb they modify, it can go either way. You can say "we worked tirelessly" or "we tirelessly worked". Both mean the same thing. Without doing a statistical analysis, I think we usually put the adverb after the verb. "I worked tirelessly", &...


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Having "namely" and "his name" so close is not a bright solution. I would avoid repetition: We need more information about this guy. Specifically, (we need to know) his name, his address, and whether he has a gun. Note: There are many synonyms of namely that you can use in this sentence. Specifically may sound a bit too formal for the ...


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