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Just X here is the same as saying "done nothing but X". ... for someone to have done nothing but make it up. Overall, the speaker/writer is asking if it's possible that someone didn't really do any work toward creating that expression, but rather tried to "fake it" and make it up moments before writing the expression down.


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The verb 'damage' needs a direct object to be a part of a Predicative Verb in such a sentence. That is why 'damaging' is a predicative adjective here. A tense of the Predicative Verb is the Past Simple in the grammar construction with the linking verb 'be' here.


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Now can be used as an interjection. See https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/357852/is-now-acting-as-an-interjection-rather-than-a-present-of-time. Often times it's split from the sentence with a comma but this isn't a strict requirement.


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Now is used to talk about the present time, thus if you won't use it, in a past sentence, to make some time comparison, it seems not to fit properly. He should have sent the form until now In your phrase, for example, since the family helped (in the past) this can't be happening now. Or they are helping right now or they have already done it.


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You may hear "now" used in the past tense, for example, if the person is telling a story, and they are placing themselves in the past as part of their narrative. For example: We found that we had fallen on hard times, but our friends helped us now, and with time things didn't seem so bad. I'm not entirely sure this is correct usage (though it doesn't ...


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Because participles can play a role as adjectives, they can be formed into adverbs. Drunkenly is an example that is used with fair frequency. However, the formation of adverbs from perfect participles seems to be rare; what is far more common is the formation of adverbs from present participles. I have no explanation for this; it is simply a personal ...


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Any more (two words) can be used as: (A) an adverb about quantities or numbers - is there any more beer? Have you seen any more birds? Used like this, it means roughly the same as 'some more'. (B) also an adverb, meaning 'no longer' or 'in the past but not now'. In this meaning, we use it in the end position - I don't drink tea any more, bus tickets are ...


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The adverbs "recently" and "occasionally" don't work well when referring to the same events or actions: subjectively, "recently" refers to a shorter span of time than the longer experience that enables you to say whether something happens only "occasionally". If you are referring to two or more events in the recent past, you can reword the first sentence (A)...


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Technically yes - you are using a simile, and as you are comparing attributes you really need to say it is "as [x] as [y]". If you are finding examples where it has been omitted, these are probably just examples of colloquial speech where care has not been taken. Examples of similes: As cute as a kitten As happy as a clam As light as a feather As blind as ...


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Jane is reading a mystery novel again The indefinite article shows that Jane is reading some novel, but the genre is mystery. And, this is not the first time she's doing that. Jane is reading another mystery novel again This looks confusing to me. It could have been better without again. Why? Because it seems redundant. Jane is reading the same ...


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