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1

No The difference is regional. I personally would only tend to say "all the better" as that is what was used most commonly around me when I was younger. However both phrases mean the same thing and can be used interchangeably. By the way do I have to include it is as in it is all the better? Again no It is perfectly acceptable to say: If you can ...


0

In the sentences you mention, "down" and "out" are not really the grammatical subjects. The subject of a sentence must be a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase. Both "down" and "out" are adverbs describing the manner of the rain falling, and the sunshine arriving: The rain came ... How did it come? ... "down". The sun came ... How did it come? ... "out". As ...


15

This seems to be a mistake. The original documentation, from 2013, reads: The World Wide Web was built over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). A User Agent, like a web browser, uses HTTP to request a HTML document. The browser then formats and displays the document to its user. HTTP is used to ...


0

Yes, you can use these sorts of phrases with time adverbs just fine. However "must have", in this case, basically describes a strong guess or belief. It does not mean there was a requirement or need. ...must have taken the medication... basically means: ...almost definitely took the medication... It doesn't mean: ...needed to take the medication....


2

You wouldn't typically do that with a single word adjective, but you would with an adjective phrase. I met a girl cute as can be. This is a book interesting to people who love computers, but no one else. That dog with eyes black as coal is mine. France is a country famous for its beautiful sights. A person smarter than me needs to ...


-1

I believe you're a bit confused. Instead of [noun] [adjective], it should be [adjective] [noun]. So, your original idea becomes, [adjective] [noun] equals [noun] [that is] [adjective]. And it's true for every sentence that you've mentioned. She is a cute girl. She's a girl that is cute. This is an interesting book. This is a book that ...


2

They're both correct and perfectly ordinary English. English allows a lot of flexibility in the placement of prepositional phrases and adverbs in general. Here are some variations, which are also grammatical: Yesterday, we met each other by chance in the subway. Yesterday in the subway, we met each other by chance. In the subway yesterday, we ...


0

I think yesterday is an adverb and in the subway and by chance are prepositional phrases acting as adverbials. I do not think there is no specific rule to arrange them in a sentence but we have to see that the construction is not clumsy. We met each other in the subway by chance yesterday. We met each other bychance in the subway yesterday. ...


0

The word "generally" has two meanings dependent on context. The first context is regular English use, in which "generally" means "usually" or "ordinarily" and without concern for specifics: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/generally The second is a scientific or mathematical context, in which "generally" means "in the general case" in which ...


-2

The word "whole" is certainly used as an adverb. However, there are situations that this word is not acceptable as an adverb.


0

Yes it can be an adverb - just not in your example sentence. An adverb is a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb. In your example, it is modifying the noun "week". For it to be an adverb, there would need to be another adjective or verb used, for example: It's a whole new ballgame. That's a whole other story.


2

Since whole modifies the noun week, it is an adjective (but see below about determiners). Here are other sentences with an adjective modifying week: It rained all of last week except on Sunday. It rained twice during that unpleasant week. Adverbs modify anything other than a noun: a verb, an adjective, a preposition, another adverb, or a whole ...


1

It rained the whole(entire) week except on Sunday In the sentence whole modifies week which is a noun. So it is a an Adjective. It is not an adverb.An adverb usually does not modify a noun or a pronoun.It may modify a noun phrase or sometimes a whole sentence.


0

It doesn't make sense. 'Neither' is used about each one of two things considered individually, and 'together' is used about more than one thing, considered jointly. You could say "John and I are not having dinner together (or with each other)", or "Neither John nor I is dining with the other". neither determiner, pronoun, conjunction, adverb not ...


1

The word late, doesn't mean "till a later time." More accurately, it means "after the desired time." "The plane's depature is late" is no guarantee it will leave at a later time. It just means "The plane's departure is after the desired time." Using your examples I worked past the desired time at work today. He stayed up past the desired time ...


1

I used to smoke As you correctly say, this "used" is usually used to to refer to actions that happened in the past which don't happen now. I used to be able to dunk when I was 20. I can barely jump at all now, and it has been like that ever since I tore my ACL. However, I smoked before. does not necessarily mean that it was happening in the past ...


0

It's incorrect to use 'more happily with that class' instead you can use 'gladly done with the class'. In your sentence more and that makes it wrong. Then,for the first happily which you have used in your sentence can be replaced by 'Delightedly'. So on the whole sentence should be framed as follows "Delightedly keeping a 4.0 GPA and gladly done with ...


0

"I'm really envy" -> "I really envy" [buzzer] "I pretty sure" -> "I'm pretty sure". [fine] I really envy you. [the verb envy requires a direct object] OR I am really envious of you.=I'm really envious of you. Use I am with the adjective and I with the verb. And it's "How well you know English.", not "how good" you know English. to know something well [...


1

Given I am X, what's valid for X is in almost all cases is the following: an adjective (I am hot, I am third, I am ready) a noun or pronoun (I am a cat, I am a worker, I am him, I am George) a verb's present participle form, these always end in -ing (I am walking ..., I am envying ...) a verb's past participle form if it makes sense to express a state and ...


0

It is best to place the "annually" at the start, because it then applies unambiguously to both groups: "Annually, one American consumes ....** Please also note that "as much amount" is incorrect. The phrase should be: "... about the same amount as ..". Further, to be technically correct, you should refer to the figures as being averages, although you ...


2

Your example makes better use of "other": Sorry, I just meant something I observe in other discussions, not in our past topics But in other contexts, you can use other adjectives. See below: In the different discussions that I had, I noticed... During the various discussions in the past... You may even use "elsewhere", but with a different word ...


0

Our own identities were simply given to us complete. Syntactically, the adjective "complete" is not actually located within the subject noun phrase "our own identities", but within the verb phrase "given to us complete", so we can't say it modifies "identities". Semantically, it does of course refer to "identities", so such elements are known as ...


0

Yes, you have got it exactly. It is not a common construction. The meaning is Our identities were completely determined without any personal involvement. That is a perfectly comprehensible statement, but not completely plausible because such complete determinism is inconsistent with any sense of self. (I am sympathetic to determinism, but I also ...


1

When you make a generalisation, for example saying that all your family like music, you can use "especially" to add a clause that says this statement applies more to one particular party than the rest. Consider this similar statement: All my family likes music, especially my father. This means that all members of your family like music to a degree, but ...


0

Could they ask their teacher: "Could you play it again please?" Of course they can. I don't see why not. To me, this is perfectly idiomatic. But how children ask this really depends on their understanding of the language and their age, I guess. If they are too young, they may just say "again". They could also say: "Could you replay it, please?" And ...


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