11

You should be aware that Collins is not an entirely reliable authority for American pronunciation.† I can't find any statement on the Collins site detailing their approach to phonetic representation, and there's a lot of wiggle room in 'broad' transcriptions representing phonology; but I think this particular representation is flat wrong. In my ...


8

You could count accents on imported words (café, resumé, piñata). Some names also include accents (Zoë, Brontë, Beyoncé). Then there's the rare case of using accents and umlauts over certain vowels (naïve, coöperation) - this is a non-standard convention not used by the majority of English speakers. It's rare to see accents or diacritics in modern ...


7

I listened to the song to confirm what you were asking. What you are hearing is a slurring of the words. American English gets very lazy in some contexts and informal contractions are made during speech only. In American English it's a lazy slur. "What are you waiting for," is slurred to, "whadda you waiting for." Which can very much sound like, "what do ...


6

With your nostrils clamped tightly shut with your fingers, it is impossible to sound the second syllable of "cotton" and "written": you will feel the pressure in your ears if you try. So yes, there is air coming out through the nose on the second syllable. Even if the word is pronounced rɪtn the nasal -n- still requires ventilation through the nose.


6

Many internet dictionaries provide recorded pronunciations: Oxford, Cambridge, Collins, Macmillan, Merriam-Webster, Wiktionary, and others. On some of these British and US pronunciations appear on the same page, on others you must be careful to select the 'U.S. English' version in your search. Keep in mind, however, that the 'American accent' varies ...


6

When the preposition in a phrasal verb has no noun complement afterwards it is usually stressed: Take off the jumper Take the jumper off Take off For this reason all the instances of back in the Original Poster's example will probably be stressed. As the Original Poster has indicated lexical verbs will usually also take stress, but auxiliaries usually won'...


5

The "t" sound in "sent" is not dropped, but it's also not aspirated. In words like "to" or "table", the "t" sound is aspirated. Here's what happens in my mouth when I say "to": My tongue pushes on the back of my teeth. No air is flowing. I make a puff of air while I pull back my tongue. This is the aspiration. My mouth moves into the shape of the "oo" (long ...


5

English traditionally uses very few diacritical marks compared to other European languages. English employs a huge number of loanwords, however, so to provide enough characters to represent all commonly used English words, you may as well use the entire Latin-1 character set. We would not want, for example, to deprive people of proper orthography for their ...


5

It all depends on the context and exactly what you're trying to communicate: I'm proud of you, Hannah! (others may be proud of you, but I want you to know that I am, too) I'm proud of you, Hannah! (not disappointed in you, as you might be thinking) I'm proud of you, Hannah! (others may have done well, but I want you to know particularly how I ...


5

The host, Craig Ferguson, is Scottish. Now, he has an accent too. I presume it is a Scottish one, but it's very mild/toned down because I find it easy to understand what he is saying. I'm sure it would be incomprehensible otherwise. The guest, Yvonne Strahovski, said "I even tried yours once", referring to Craig's Scottish accent. Craig then gets her to ...


5

Short answer: The vowel is usually /ɑː/ in both American and British English. The /l/ is pronounced roughly half the time in American English, but usually not pronounced in British English. For more discussion, see below. Two different transcriptions for the same pronunciation Different linguists transcribe the same pronunciation in different ways. ...


4

Yes, that's correct. You would only stress "some" if it was the most important part of the question - "Do you want some coffee or a lot of coffee? In that case, "coffee" would be unstressed.


4

There is an /nt/-weakening rule; it's unclear if the /t/ is really "dropped" To me, there doesn't seem to be anything special about "grunting" vs. "internet", "winter", "printer". I think the reason for the varied responses in the comments to your question is that native speakers often don't perceive /t/ to be dropped in any of these words (as Teacher ...


4

I've lived in the United States my entire life. In my experience, native speakers always pronounce these words as basicly and logicly. The pronunciation basical-ly sounds distinctly foreign; in fact, in my experience, I think that the pronunciation basical-ly is the most common pronunciation mistake that I ever hear. In slow and careful speech, I could ...


3

It's pronounced the same way as 'sinking'. I'm interested to know how you thought it might be pronounced.


3

How long has it been bad? is perfectly fine to ask. A native might say How long has it been that bad? How long has it been this bad? Your other question Since then has it been bad? is incorrect, and should be Since when has it been bad?


3

It's actually the same in some parts of the US and different in others. It's a phenomenon known as the cot/caught merger, and it's one of the primary features linguists use to classify American dialects. Worth noting that in your specific example of "drop" vs. "jaw," there is a marked difference in length, regardless of the merger, due to the placement of ...


2

The second one sounds great to me!. (As an American) I don't really ever hear people pronounce it the first way (with an 'or' sound like in "shore" and "oar"). I almost always hear it the way you pronounce it the second time, with an 'er' (like in "her" and "fur"). Another way you can pronounce it is to pronounce the u with an 'oo' sound, so it sounds like "...


2

In my West Coast AmE, enunciation of consonants tends to follow formality. (But in places like the Southeastern US, dropping consonants can be part of culturally important regional speech patterns.) If, in casual speech, my sister says something that confuses me, I might say: "Hunh? ...I dunno what y'er talking (a)bout." (Note this is never the way I ...


2

As a native American Speaker, hopefully I can clarify a little bit. The first thing you need to understand is American Accents vary a lot, with the biggest factors being location, class and to a lesser extent race. With location, I'd say their are 3-4 different accents, and the a couple of city-specific accents. There is a southern accent (has a distinctive ...


2

To answer your questions simply: the h can be silent, and generally is in casual English when pronouncing words that begin with wh- such as what, where and whip. In casual conversation, the h of his can become very subtle, but full omission of the h pushes this from proper English to regional dialect. When I say, "What's his name?" the h is subtle and ...


2

The emphasis indicates the crucial part of the sentence. You could put the emphasis in lots of different places, depending on what you want to .... emphasize. I'm sort of busy right now" I am busy, but perhaps I know of another person who could help you. I'm sort of busy right now. I am a little bit busy, but I might be able to help you if it won't ...


2

Here is a recording of my voice (General American / Standard American English) repeating the speech that you are working on from https://youtu.be/mu-eaxlA5jo This second recording may help to put your attention on the places where I think you sound the most different than me. There are only three important places! The vowel sound you make in frAn is ...


2

The question could be asked a half dozen ways in daily speech. Emphasize "I", and it could mean "I'm powerless in the situation". Emphasize "do" and it could express anxiety or bewilderment. Emphasize "supposed" and it could express impatience or annoyance at being criticized. Emphasize "am" and it could mean "Don't tell me what I should have done when the ...


2

This varies somewhat from place to place in the US. To take another example, "new" is pronounced "nyoo" in some places and "noo" in others. My mother was from the Boston area and she always said "nyoo", whereas the kids I grew up with in northern Indiana said "noo". Whether you add the "y" sound is fairly consistent from word to word in a given place, ...


2

As a native speaker I first thought "What are you talking about? The first sound is clearly /w/!" Then I listened to it another 10 times, at which point I could start to hear the /h/ which you have correctly identified in the clip. "wh" used to be pronounced /hw/, and sometimes still is, but that sound is becoming rarer as it is being replaced by a plain /w/...


2

It's is pronounced like the z in zebra. When have means "to be obligated or forced to do X", the pronunciation can change. The v in have can be pronounced like the f in fly, and the s in has can be pronounced like the s in sand.


2

The b in both words is the same. The t sound is not usually silent. However, the t sound can be unreleased or not pronounced in normal conversational speed in certain sound contexts. So, they are pronounced differently. Just find an online dictionary that offers pronunciation you can listen to such as Merriam Webster. Or if the problem is your ...


2

I want to stress that Rachel should be careful when she says that Americans use "muna". I think she needs to be clear that not all Americans do this. It probably depends on a variety of factors, like the speaker's mood, or region. I understand what she is saying, but she made it sound like Americans do this often, and that most Americans do this. I don't ...


2

Yes, this is a genuine reduction, in such informal phrases as "Muna get you." This is a reduction of "I'm gonna get you." Note: Muna is only used when I is the subject. Also note that this is not used as often as gonna, which is used on a regular basis. Muna is even more informal, and it is not said on a regular basis; some people may never say it. ...


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