4

I am a native speaker originally from Britain, now living in the US. I believe the British/American distinction is irrelevant. Both sentences are perfectly valid to my ears, each means the same in the UK as in the USA, but they have the capacity to differ subtly in meaning from each other. And that difference is exactly what you say. The first could be ...


4

In your comment you mention that the context is: I was talking with my course mate, we were discussing the Literary Theory course and I'm quite bad at literature, the sentence was what I said In this case all you have to do is switch would and that to make: I don't like literary theory, I can't imagine what that would be like.


4

Normal usage would be: "Come on, it won't do you any harm!" (lose the final, repetitive 'you') but your alternative of "it won't harm you!" is also fine, though "it won't hurt you!" sounds more natural to me.


4

In the United States, there can be little practical difference between the two. "Pharmacy" is simply a formal term for what often amounts to the same thing. To be clear: A "pharmacy" is a business (or a part of a hospital) that dispenses medication. A public pharmacy does not have to sell other products, but many do because it helps them make money. ...


4

They are all fine except the second one, which has a different meaning: estimate can only be a noun, so the phrase estimate delivery date would have to mean "date for delivery of the estimate".


3

The book is correct: it should be vegetables (plural). When it's a count noun, and it's a general statement, then the plural form is used: ✔ I don't like cars. ✘ I don't like car. ✔ I don't like movies. ✘ I don't like movie. When it's a mass noun, then the singular form is used: ✔ I don't like bacon. ✘ I don't like bacons. ✔ I don't ...


3

Your sentence is correct as it stands. "Already" can be used with the present tense: I am already in London. I already play tennis, so I'd like to learn squash. You could consider using the present perfect in your example: You have to choose an hour that hasn't already been taken by someone else.


2

One simple way of saying it is "I got $50 change from a $100 bill"


2

Going by the title of your question, you want to know whether to use 'remote' or 'remotely'. The context for this, in your description, is that not having to work from an office will give you flexibility. I conclude from this that you would like the job that you're seeking to be something you can do from afar, or "remotely". This is important because I ...


2

This is how Merriam-Webster defines the verb savage: : to attack or treat brutally If I mutilate myself with a knife, then it would make sense to say I savaged myself. In fact, I'd argue it would be a natural phrase in that context. It's at least one that I've heard applied in such a context before. The reflexive use is also fine in that context. But ...


2

I got fifty dollars back (in change). [after a transaction: various bills] OR I got a fifty back (in change). [that means a fifty dollar bill] I took the trouble of writing this out so you can see how to actually say it. The word change above is optional. My change was a fifty-dollar bill. My change was fifty dollars.


1

I agree with Jasper that the common use of double-park is more like this. In the situation you describe we would say Someone has parked behind me. The common response would be: I can't get out I can't back out "Reverse out" works, although to my American ears it sounds like it's from another English dialect, or from a non-native speaker.


1

"He prepared for school like he always does." is the correct usage. The preparing for school is past tense because the preparing happened in the past, the attending school is present tense as he currently attends school. If you said, "He prepared for school like he always did." you would be saying he no longer attends school but he is preparing for it ...


1

"Change", meaning "money given to someone because they paid for something that cost less than the amount they gave", is a non-count (mass) noun. So we do not say "a change". Using the example given, we could say, for example, "I got change of $50 back", or "I got $50 change back". Change


1

Your question is a wee bit confusing since it contrasts working hours (“9 to 5”) first with the poorly defined notion of “flexibility”, and second with something about remoteness. But, reading between the lines, and based on your use of bold emphasis, I think you’re asking for a word to express the opposite of working in an office or other more-or-less ...


1

I think all of these are good choices (with ruined and damaged being the two most natural). Ruined In addition to a "downgrading" of someone's image, this also implies that the image is now more on the "bad" than the "good" side. I wouldn't necessarily use this if the image went from "superb" to "good". Spoiled This has a connotation that the ...


1

For many purposes, "smear": and "smudge" have pretty much the same meaning. When it is done intentionally with makeup, I would use "smudge". When is is done intentionally by a a painter using oil pain, I would use "smear". When refering to a situation like that in the image, I would use "run" rather than either "smear" or "smudge: Your tears have caused ...


1

In U.S. English, a common way to refer to this hairstyle is that it's cut/angled/layered "to frame the face." See all of these youtube tutorials on how to cut hair like this. While not an exact match for your sentence, a very natural way to express the same idea would be something like "locks/wisps of hair framed her face."


1

The above sentence is from Manhattan Prep 5lb 2nd Edition for GRE under sentence completion, question number 12. Akimbo is to keep hands on the hips with elbows turned outside. So the phrase akimbo to might mean to have attitude which we usually show when we keep our hands on hips and elbows outside. The correct fit for the sentence is abreast of


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