3

Be very leery about using the word only when giving rules about English. You wrote: you only use the proposition 'on' with nouns that refer to groups of people The three example nouns you provided – team, board, commission – indeed typically use on instead of in. However, I thought of three other nouns (there are probably a few more) that can refer to ...


2

In that sentence, you don't need any appostrophes. As you probably know, the construction apostrophe+s is a way to build the genitive case in English, a remnant of an old case system that has been largely lost in modern English. Nouns in the genitive function as determiners of other nouns, and so appear in front of other nouns. So that is one way to tell ...


1

In Australian English, particularly Sydney street/jail slang, it definitely means something very different; if Mr White got got for his crimes, then Mr White would be bleeding to death on a prison yard somewhere. Full of puncture wounds, probably also badly bruised. And nobody saw a thing.


1

[In the UK] We would usually re-order the line and say, "If it hadn't been / had it not been for her (and her quick thinking) they would all have died." ['her and her quick thinking' is a bit quaint.] But, preserving your order, we might say either, "They would all have died if it hadn't been / had it not been for her and her quick thinking", or "They ...


1

It means You, reader, take this classic tale... which is an imperative or "command" or "suggestion." The meaning of take here is that of consider as an example. (See Merriam-Webster definition 18b.)


1

The apostrophe is used to indicate missing letters relative to some standard English. There are a number of situations where letters may be missing: There are several common contractions, such as I'm for I am, or don't for do not. There is also the use of the apostrophe in possessives (originally also a contraction, now just a rule). There is also the use ...


1

When I was young, say fifty years ago, using do support with have was American: in British English we simply didn't say Do you have (unless we meant in a habitual sense): we said Have you got, or (in a more formal register) Have you. Since then, Do you have and I don't have have become more common in British English, but they haven't completely driven out ...


1

The auxiliary "do" doesn't appear with the auxiliary "have". Not every "have" acts as an auxiliary.   She doesn't have brown hair. This sentence is fine. This "have" is the main verb of its clause.   *She doesn't have bleached her hair.   She hasn't bleached her hair. Here, he main verb is the particple "bleached". The "...


1

It's not idiomatic to "dry up your clothes" in American English. To my knowledge, it's also not idiomatic in British English. You'll notice that of your results, four of the first five results appear to be Indian English. One is a novel self-published by an Indian author, one is a journal review from the Guild of Indian English, one is translated poetry, ...


1

The verb leave can take a for phrase indicating the destination. This can be a real place: They left for Venice. I'm leaving for the coast tomorrow. Or a notional place (like a job): She left for a much better job. But it can't be an -ing clause. There's not really any reason for this (most -ing clauses don't make sense as destinations, but ...


1

Would you really leave your position to start your own business? If we said "leave your job for another job", the other job is seen as a relatively static thing that already exists. You would be leaving your job for this thing. Starting your own business is an activity that you would be doing, so we would say, "to do", i.e. "to start your own business". ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible