7

I assume this is set in New York. The E train is the name of a New York subway line (it runs from downtown Manhattan to Queens). The cost of a ticket is $2.50 (or rather "was" from March 3, 2013 – March 21, 2015, as the cost now is $2.75) The woman is being sarcastic. She is insinuating that the man has no evidence. She says "with what you ...


7

First, the second paragraph in your question is incorrect. If you're talking about individual ownership, the apostrophe goes after each person's name: Those are Lucia's and John's cars, respectively. If they both own the same car, then you put the apostrophe only after the last person's name: That is Lucia and John's car. You can't mix up the two ...


6

If you want to talk about "the people called 'Souza'", they are "The Souzas" (plural), and so if you must you can say "the Souzas' house" (again plural). As a question, "How many houses do the Souzas have". You use "do" because "the Souzas" is plural. Its possible to use "Souza" attributively and say "How many houses does the Souza family have?" This ...


2

Prepositions are hard. Any rule about prepositions is plagued with exceptions. "At" usually introduces the idea of a place or a time At the park or At noon "In" usually introduces the idea of containment. Put the milk in the refrigerator Come in out of the rain. A school is both a building and a place so either preposition may be ...


2

It doesn't stand for anything: it is simply the possessive clitic exactly as in Tom's friend. There is an unobvious rule in English that though we say my friend and Tom's friend we don't normally say *a friend of me or *a friend of Tom. The idiomatic phrases are a friend of mine and a friend of Tom's". I hesitate to say the other forms are ...


2

1. Do not use Disconfirm Disconfirm: [Merriam-Webster] : to deny or refute the validity of Up until reading this question, I didn't even know that disconfirm was a word, and I have a fairly large vocabulary. It's simply not something I've ever encountered or used before. The word used far more often, as mentioned in the definition, is deny. Google Ngram ...


2

The first examples are what is called the epistemic use of the modals "can" and "must": they're saying things about the speaker's knowledge and expectations, not about possibilities or powers in the real world. They both say "I am sure that" or "I conclude that" it isn't broken. Certainly can't is more likely there in ...


1

Your examples don't seem to require "do" or "does". We would normally only include "do" or "does" either to confirm, contradict or contrast a previous question or statement. For example: Q. Do you remember that day? A. I do remember that day. I don't remember much from last year but I do remember that day.


1

"But let me assure you, this, like any story worth telling, is all about a girl." This sentence uses parenthetical commas (although I think you missed one out of your quotation). This is worth noting because many people are more familiar with the use of brackets for parenthesis, and replacing them can often make the sentence clearer and easier to ...


1

It's the same as: Regardless of the direction in which the entrepreneur decides to take the business, it's important to note, it's not a permanent decision. It's grammatically correct and perfectly acceptable, but you're not alone in finding it odd. This usage is called the dangling preposition which is frowned upon by purist linguists.


1

From an English language point of view, "disconfirm" does not mean to cancel a previously given confirmation - it means to disprove something previously held to be true. In a real-life setting, if someone "confirmed" their attendance at an event, the subsequent reversal of that decision would simply be a "cancellation". I did ...


1

Prepositions of place are a nightmare for learners so I will limit this to your specific question. Generally, whatever happens within the perimeter a particular institution can be said to happen 'in' or 'at' that place. So, in that sense they are interchangeable. 'At' may also refer to events that happen outside the perimeter, such as the area just ...


1

Dick's burgers deserve the same treatment as Dick's dog or Dick's car. If you are simply referring to burgers supplied by Dick, as in : We are having some of Dick's burgers for lunch, you don't capitalise - any more than you would if you said: We are having burgers that we obtained from Dick's. But if you are referring to the name of the outlet, as in: We ...


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