5

As per Andy's comment to your question the references you cite all include the meaning of booze to mean alcohol, an alcoholic drink or an alcoholic beverage. By definition then as wine is alcohol and beer is alcohol, the meaning of booze can include both wine and beer. So in conclusion this is really just a simple logical case as you have your ...


4

There is an historical tidbit in the US which slightly colors the definition. During "prohibition", from 1920 to 1933, the term "booze" gained more traction. Though I have no direct knowledge of the details, what I glean from movies of the era is that "booze" was more strongly associated with "hard" liquor. This is partly true because the manufacture, ...


1

From the examiner's comment, I am inferring that there is a passage of text that your answer is based on. The examiner is saying when talking about things mentioned in the provided text, use the same naming convention. For example, if the passage talked about a character named "William Jones", don't then refer to him as "Bill J." in any of your answers ...


1

They all have unique meanings which a dictionary will tell you. However, they can be interchangeable in certain contexts. "Can" indicates that something is a possibility eg. "I can go to the shops for you" "Could" indicates a possibility that is perhaps dependent on something a condition eg. "I could go to the shops for you if I can borrow your car" "May" ...


1

The most common usage is (c) but if the audience is all male or it's an archaic context, you will likely see (a).


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