47 votes

Why are there two “is”’s in: Why is yawning is contagious?

There is no "explanation". These are simply errors. You should not see these in any edited text, but this kind of stumbling over words is not uncommon in unrehearsed speech. The example in ...
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19 votes

Why are there two “is”’s in: Why is yawning is contagious?

The sentence with is repeated appears to be an error. The sentence with was twice is perfectly good, though a little confusing. It reads What was saleable as far as the freak was concerned was, of ...
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6 votes

Why are there two “is”’s in: Why is yawning is contagious?

Some of these sentences are simply errors, such as “*Why is yawning is contagious?” If I had to guess, perhaps the writer meant to type, “Why is yawning so contagious,” but accidentally typed si for ...
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  • 3,891
2 votes

Correct usage of the word flaky

Looking at Merriam-Webster’s definition, this usage of flaky matches definition 2 of entry 2 - “not reliable in performance or behavior: UNDEPENDABLE”, and is quite commonly used, though most ...
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  • 4,651
2 votes

"translator of" or "Translator for"

In cases like this, "of" is usually used for situations where there can be only one such position in the company, for example the CEO or President of the company. For any other position, you ...
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  • 431
1 vote

Alternative or one word for saying re-mentioning it

I would use "reiterate", so "I just want to reiterate that...". (formal definition in Cambridge dictionary: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reiterate)
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  • 382
1 vote

What is the difference between "to stop", "to halt" and "to cease"?

Halt means stop moving. Cease means stop doing something. Stop is a more general term that can include both meanings. – Kate Bunting
1 vote

What does "subject + to + infinitive" mean?

This is headlinese, which often omits little words such as articles and the copula. A form of that in normal English grammar would be Russia is to halt gas deliveries..., which is one of the ways of ...
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1 vote

Do people say "have you enough room for me?" in British English?

They are both correct, but I would be less surprised to hear a British speaker use the first phrasing than I would if I heard an American say it that way.
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1 vote
Accepted

Which is correct Maybe or May be

Maybe meaning perhaps is written as one word. They are written as separate words in a sentence like I may be late tomorrow if my car won't start.
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1 vote

Is it correct to say "How many more sets do you have?" at the gym?

There's nothing ungrammatical about "How many more sets do you have?", but it sounds a little odd. You don't "have" sets that are in the future. It is far more idiomatic to ask &...
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  • 147k
1 vote

Is "push to" correct in this context?

As a native American English speaker, it makes sense to me. The Penguins wished to avoid game 7 - meaning they won game 6. As they wanted to avoid game seven, the Rangers had to put effort into ...
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1 vote

Expressing that it's not possible to achieve something in a concise word or phrase

I like “it’s a fool’s errand.” (Which comes from the old and cruel tradition of hazing new coworkers by assigning them impossible tasks — buying some blinker fluid, for example.) There is also “...
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1 vote

Expressing that it's not possible to achieve something in a concise word or phrase

The top answer should be "impossible". It's impossible to make the deadline. thesaurus.com offers more colorful alternatives. To think you could meet this deadline is absurd. Trying to ...
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