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37

I believe the most appropriate phrase would be: You look like a catfisher. That is, you look like a person who catfishes. The sentence "You look like a catfish" just makes me think someone is being compared to an actual catfish, likely as commentary about their mouth or facial hair. If you want to use the verb, a "-y" or "-ey" suffix is typically added ...


13

This is a very new use of a word, and doubtless the usage is in flux. It seems that the first use was as a verb. "To catfish" (often in form "catfishing") meaning to deceive by the use of fake images on a dating site. It is sometimes used to mean "to be deceived". It should be compared with the existing term "phishing", and the non-internet meaning of "to ...


12

"The quest for [anything]" is an established phrase. "The [anything] quest" is not, and without context it might be momentarily confusing. Otherwise there is no difference.


11

As a general pattern, you can't say "you look X" where X is something other than an actual adjective, even if that something-else looks like or functions like an adjective in other contexts. For example: You look running. vs "A running person" You look baby. vs "A baby bird" ... As noted by James K, in this case catfish isn't adjective-like at all; it's ...


11

As Lambie says, drinks are either carbonated or non-carbonated. I believe these are universal terms used in government or official communication. In the US: Carbonated soft drinks are collectively referred to as soda, pop, and in some parts of the country Coke (even for carbonated drinks that are not Coca-Cola). Non-carbonated drinks are referred to by ...


8

In the US, the terms "soda," "pop," and "coke" (small "c") all refer to carbonated non-alcoholic beverages, but depending on locale, only one will actually be used with regularity. In general: "Coke" is most used in the South. Note that "the South" does not extend west of Texas, despite the name. I have been advised by Southerners that, if you ask for "a ...


8

The meaning of "She upended the chessboard" is very clear to me. She suddenly lifted one side of the chessboard, causing all the pieces to be knocked over or otherwise move away from their positions. It is possible that all of the pieces fell off, and were scattered across the table and/or fell onto the floor. It is also possible that she lifted the side ...


6

To "make something about oneself" means to view a situation entirely from one's own point of view, ignoring or minimising any impact or involvement of other people. It is generally thought of as selfish behaviour. Example: Person1: "I looked dreadful at John's funeral. It was raining, I got soaking wet and I just felt a mess". Person2: "Wow, you'...


5

The basic term is carbonated/uncarbonated water or carbonated/uncarbonated drinks. It would be the "technical" term. Not the everyday one. In the UK, they say fizzy drinks for stuff like Coke and in the US, they say soft drinks. As for water, sparkling water is used in both for carbonated water. carbonated carbonated and fizzy drinks [UK]


4

No. "Cut off" implies an action, often deliberate but not necessarily, that causes an interruption to you or interferes with you in some way. In your marathon runner example, cutting off would suggest one runner veering to be directly in front of another so as to force the other to have to adjust pace to avoid collision or tie up with the first. I am more ...


4

As a British person, I would say that American people often use "lightning rod" when they are talking about a lightning conductor. This is usually mounted at the highest point of a building, and connected to the ground by an electrically conductive link of copper or other metal. UK and US building and safety professionals tend to talk about "lightning ...


4

You are confused on the types of words. There is a noun "Lightning". Lightning is a huge spark between clouds. Then there is a noun "thunder" You can see the lightning before you hear the thunder. It is possible to use "thunder" as a verb (meaning to produce thunder), but it is normally used metaphorically. It means "shout", or make a loud noise. ...


4

You have made an assumption that the second sentence Upend the chessboard halfway and let's start a new game. is a valid thing to say. If someone upends a chess board, you almost certainly won't be starting another game.


3

On its own I don't think it was that bad. is a generally unenthusiastic comment on something, such as It was not very good. I almost liked it. It was reasonable. However, if someone has just made a remark, then the phrase is a reply in context: I thought the food was disgusting. It wasn't that bad. meaning, "I don't think it was as bad as you are ...


3

There are several good answers here already. To address the example at the end of your question - whether this makes sense in English: The vase has been upended, please upend it to stay like before. I don't think so. The vase has been upended - this means it has been knocked sideways. So it went from something that looks like | to something that looks ...


3

Cambridge Dictionary" "She upended the chessboard halfway through the game because she was losing." OP: I figured out, to start a new game, somebody must say: Upend the chessboard halfway and let's start a new game. Answer: To start a new game, it seems that what is meant is to "clear the chessboard of pieces". Yes, you could upend it and the pieces ...


3

You don't say "the sky starts lightning'. Lightning is a noun, meaning an electric discharge between a cloud and another cloud, or a cloud and the ground. Thunder is the sound you hear because the air is heated suddenly by the lightning. They are not the "same thing". Lightning is what you see; thunder is what you hear. You can't have one without the other. ...


3

You're right: you have identified an ambiguity in English. When a noun is formed from a verb, like "care", it is sometimes ambiguous whether an "of" complement is semantically the subject or the object of the verb. Other examples: The experience of poverty ("poverty" is the object of the verb "experience") The experience of people in the past ("...


3

Using "so" in the phrase invites a comparison. The slightly simpler I'm not much of a drinker will do.


3

This is shortened from: Why did you make him live all those years alone? The verb is make. The action of "making him live alone" occurred in the past, and is complete, as I understand this. Why did you go to Florida last week? is the same grammatical structure.


3

They are mostly interchangeable, however there is a slight but subtle difference. 'To notice' is more likely to be used in cases where there are physical clues that help you to guess something, for example: I noticed there was something wrong when I walked into the room and saw the frown on her face. In this sentence the physical clue is her frown. 'To ...


3

I've never seen plural "blacks" or "whites" referred to in chess. This is typical, with the colours usually capitalised (in the same way as football team names): Fischer playing Sicilian (B99) as Black Fischer was Black Fischer was playing Black Opening for Black According to Karpov (book title) Opening repertoire for Black (book title) "What was Carlsen’s ...


3

I suspect you are misinterpreting the word "read" near the end of the sentence. "I'd read them" could mean "I had read them" with "read" pronounced like the color "red." From the context, "I'd read them" should be interpreted as "I would read them" with "read" pronounced like the type of plant "reed." The overall meaning is "I did well in school because I ...


2

Short and sweet answer: Yes, and both make sense semantically to me. Slightly longer answer: To me, to get stains out of something implies that the stains might be a bit tougher, and more difficult to remove.


2

The song uses the phrase metaphorically. The singer is feeling strong, confident, determined, ready to conquer the world, ready to deal with any problems in her way. The singer is inviting any person - or inviting the world - to oppose her. She is ready to fight and win. She is eager to face any challenge that you put in her way, she is eager to face any ...


2

Here "pay" may mean "be profitable" or "be successful" or "achieve the design goals" or all of these together. In general this sentence means that changing the design on the fly, to accommodate short-term demands or "easy ways out" is often a poor idea. I don't think 'customize" was actually the best word for his meaning, but the meaning does come across, ...


2

These sentences have the same meaning. Set is used as "Set in place", meaning there isn't an established rule that is law or commonly accepted. Fixed is used as "Fixed in place", meaning the same thing. In this instance, set and fixed are synonyms.


2

Strictly speaking, in school a "period" is defined as a specific time in the day when you have some scheduled school activity. A "class" is defined as a period during which you receive instruction. Some schools have a short "homeroom" period in which the teacher takes attendance (documents which students are present and which are absent). "Recess" is a ...


2

Need is sometimes referred to as a semi-modal. It seems to be on the way from being a full modal (like should) to being a non-modal auxiliary like want. So expressions like "You need not go" and "Need I go?" are a bit old-fashioned now. Some people, particularly older people, say them naturally; but many people would say "You don't need to go" and "Do I ...


2

Not everybody is trained in first aid and so I would personally be hesitant to over-simplify an instruction like this. The noun "compress" meaning a lint pad pressed on to part of the body is fairly well recognised, so if your statement was for an audience you believe would have some knowledge of first aid or would not require too much explanation you could ...


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