16

There are a lot of written instances of off-the-shelf policy in Google Books (which ignores hyphens when matching search strings, but they would usually be included). By contrast, there are only half-a-dozen instances of off-the-rack policy (which will always mean exactly the same thing). It's just a relatively "transparent" metaphorical usage ...


14

"Off the rack" comes from the clothing world, where it means a suit that you buy without any alterations for sleeves or cuffs or the like, for fit. So in this case, it means a policy that's already in place somewhere else and brought over and applied without any changes.


3

It's awkward in that sentence. It doesn't really mean anything. I can tell from context it means "bad", but otherwise it means the person from AEI was in a hurry and couldn't think of a better phrase. "Off the rack" can be a snobbish expression meaning lacking taste and refinement. A wealthy woman has her dress tailored by her maids. ...


3

In this context, Rick is stating that by "press(ing) on the gas pedal", they are accelerating, and hence, going at a greater speed. The word "blow" simply means "to pass by" or "been seen by" a police officer, and then, hopefully get pulled over for exceeding the speed limit.


3

We called the room pictured "sports hall", we had several of these in different buildings of the school but we'd differentiate between them by saying "the sports hall in D-block, F-block" etc. we also had a building devoted to one large sports hall which was THE sports hall, part of the same building was a room with running machines and ...


3

Buckle can be used as an intransitive verb, meaning to start a job or task with vigour and determination, usually followed by 'down', e.g. I had to finish my homework by 9 PM so I buckled down and wrote quickly. The use of 'together' is unusual but understandable. The kittens needed to work hard together as a team. Buckle intransitive verb 2: to apply ...


2

The way the characters speak would be considered non-standard in British and American English. As noted on a sister-site https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/421002/we-indians-often-say-i-finished-my-homework-today-itself-which-i-know-is-wron In Indian dialects, the word "itself" is added to add emphasis to time expressions as in Yesterday ...


2

I agree, it is badly written sentence. On analysis, "having been" can only refer to the subject (the governments) and not the employees. some governments merely substitute living allowances for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned to the United Nations. A comparable example would be: David washed his dog, having got muddy on ...


2

True-crime-bragging is a new coinage, a one-off phrase. It's meant to evoke the recently popularized humblebrag Humblebrag humblebrag verb : to make a seemingly modest, self-critical, or casual statement or reference that is meant to draw attention to one's admirable or impressive qualities or achievements https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/...


2

Stop proudly telling stories (= bragging) about that true crime (= the crime that actually happened, and involved real people). Summer interrupted Beth because they already know the story or/and the topic is unpleasant/disturbing to talk about. Also, true crime is a genre in literature and cinema to examine actual (particularly strange, shocking, or ...


2

Looks mostly fine to me. I might have expressed it with different words, but yours is clear, concise and understandable. I would have included "the next two days". And I'd have included more preamble, and the afterword: Dear all, I hope you're making good progress on your essays. Just to let you know, I won't be available for the next two days ...


2

Protect implies that there is a threat of some kind. We use from or against to express what that threat is. The threat is really Covid, or infection by Covid: The mask protects us against infection/Covid. But by metonymy we can also refer to the source of the infection as the threat: The mask protects us against people with Covid. and specifically The ...


2

Yes, you can use [plej] instead of [pleɪ]; there's no significant difference. I've seen the diphthong /eɪ/ transcribed both ways in phonetic transcriptions: [eɪ] or [ej]. However, you cannot use [j] for interconsonantal [i], so [bit] or [bɪt] cannot be transcribed as *[bjt]. (The main difference between [i] and [j] is that the former is a vowel and has no ...


1

Etymonline says, ring meaning "resonance of coin or glass as a test of genuineness" is from 1850, with transferred use (ring of truth, etc.).' So Greta is saying it doesn't sound true, though I can't tell what she's referring to. And I don't know why she calls Jeannine "Roger", but maybe it's your punctuation. (I don't think this ...


1

The pronoun "one" is seen by some speakers as rather formal. There are people who go their whole lives and never use it. A "one" here or there is OK, but if you find yourself using too many "one"s then your style may begin to sound affected or stilted. If you are going for an informal style then you may wish to avoid "...


1

This is Peter, one of the disciples of Jesus. She is referencing the Bible, specifically Matthew 26:51-54 and Matthew 26:69-75. One source is here: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+26&version=AMP


1

When it comes to a road, or a street, "in" the road means something is actually occupying the road surface where cars drive, for example: There is a man standing in the road. We refer to all the buildings etc that may be at either side of a specified road and use that road name as their address as being "on" the road, for example: ...


1

I think of belts when I see the phrase buckle together. If I don’t buckle up, my trousers will fall down. So, buckle together is to act in unison lest such a calamity like dropping ones trousers occurs.


1

Yes. As X is a comparative structure. Whenever you see as X, there's another Y that the X is being compared to, even if it's not expressed. The test does not mean as much to her. So the test doesn't mean as much to her as something else, like something else, or than something else. We'd have to have more of the conversation to know. It's possible the test ...


1

Hi are you working for this apartment? I am a new tenant living at 2009. Can I request a buzzer code? Hi --> Excuse me This one might depend on the country. I can imagine that in the USA a Hi in this context might be more commonplace. (But then again, the way the customer-employee dynamic works there is pretty special, and not entirely like elsewhere in ...


1

We use "Pitch a fit" quite often in Iowa. I don't think anyone here says "throw a fit".


1

Yes, but all of them have different semantics. Being + V3 is not grammatical by itself, but you can add copula (to indicate continuous aspect version of be + V3) or use it as gerund. Basically, being + V3 is just a conjugation of be + V3. For be + V3 vs got + V3, look at this answered question: When do you use Get or Be in the passive voice?


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