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147

The term is "grand theft" and the category it goes into (based on what is being stolen) is "auto". Grand theft, also called grand larceny, designates theft that is large in magnitude or serious in penological consequences. Grand theft is contrasted with petty theft, theft that is of smaller magnitude or lesser seriousness. What constitutes "grand theft" ...


63

That would be an (indoor) "gym" or "gymnasium". From Wikipedia: A gym, short for gymnasium, is an open air or covered location for gymnastics, athletics, and gymnastic services. The word is derived from the ancient Greek gymnasium. They are commonly found in athletic and fitness centers, and as activity and learning spaces in educational institutions. "...


62

I think your examples would be understandable to contemporary speakers of AmE, but they are usually reserved for objects with forgotten identities. That being said, comments and synonyms of the terms below have shown me that there is a lot of carryover from object name placeholders to those for people. This is probably due to the fact that the person’s name ...


62

In fact, there is no difference between behaviour and behavior except spelling. The former is preferred in British and Commonwealth English, the latter is the American spelling. The entries are confusing because there is no single "Cambridge Dictionary." Cambridge University Press actually publishes dozens of different dictionaries. Their website, however, ...


56

Wiktionary defines the expression plug out as Irish: (Ireland, transitive, colloquial) To unplug; to remove (an electrical device) from its socket. From The Daily Edge : 13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Another uniquely Irish phrase is 'to plug out' as in ' plug out the telly'.


54

They mean the same thing; behaviour is the British English spelling; behavior is the American spelling. The definitions say the same thing in different ways.


53

This is fundamentally a class distinction. With any given amount of land and labor, more food value can be created from growing grain and vegetables than from growing animals for meat. In the medieval economy, the local lord had title to all the land and had a large amount of labor at his disposal as a sort of tax on his peasant subjects. The lord could ...


53

There are as many answers to this as there are situations. In informal settings, one might only give their first name. So, if I'm at a bar and I start chatting with someone, I would usually only give my first name... or if I'm being introduced to new people by friends, I'll only give my first name. In formal or business settings, one might give both first ...


53

The use of these words varies between countries. Your friend is clearly employing the Indian English colloquial use of the word. I have visited India several times and it doesn't take long to pick up the differences. I assume the Indian variation is due to the prevalence of vegetarians in the country and the limited number of animals that are eaten. In ...


51

In British School, that would be more likely to be called a 'Sports Hall' than a 'Gym'. In Britain, one tends to think of a 'Gym' as a room with weights, and machines, rather than a large hall.


48

As far as I know, that would be called takeout (sometimes referred to as takeout food). At least, that's what I've most commonly heard my American and Canadian friends say when talking about a prepared meal that you take home with you or someplace else instead of eating it where you bought it. I guess the reason it's called takeout is because you literally ...


45

I think most people would recommend you stick to one style or the other. Why? Well, it doesn't matter too much, but if you mix styles the reader might notice! And that's bad—if they're noticing stuff like that, then they're paying attention to how you're writing rather than what you're writing. In other words, you're distracting the reader. You ...


42

I believe that you are referring to the idiomatic meanings. nailed it to complete a task successfully or get something right Example. A: Oh, you didn't burn the cake this time. B: Yep, nailed it! Nail down can have a similar meaning. nail down : to make (something, such as a victory) certain to happen <They need to score ...


37

I believe the most appropriate phrase would be: You look like a catfisher. That is, you look like a person who catfishes. The sentence "You look like a catfish" just makes me think someone is being compared to an actual catfish, likely as commentary about their mouth or facial hair. If you want to use the verb, a "-y" or "-ey" suffix is typically added ...


36

The penny is the coin, and cent refers to how much the penny is worth. If I told you I had 15 cents, that could be three nickels, or a dime and five pennies, or two nickels and five pennies (there are other possible combinations as well). Since she already mentioned the dime, it makes sense that she also said "pennies" instead of "cents." I suppose she ...


36

In English, we can move the head of noun phrase, which normally appears at the end, to the beginning. This helps with the naming systems used in technical jargons and other situation in which we want to put the general category on the left, and the particular category on the right. In writing, we usually put in a comma when this reversal happens. So for ...


35

Sure. For example, Canadian English has standard spellings that are derived from both British and American influences. Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions. French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (...


34

In America, we use the term "unplug", not "plug out"


33

In the United States, when writing a check, it's customary to write and 00/100 or and no/100 or and xx/100 before "dollars" to indicate that no cents are to be added beyond the indicated number of dollars. Sometimes people also follow this custom when writing a contract. The "/100" refers to cents, since there are 100 cents in a dollar. Sometimes people ...


33

No, I don't think this is acceptable -- I've never heard this used before in American English, and I'm pretty sure it isn't used in any dialect. An actor is a person and must be referred to as "who." Also, "favourite" is a British spelling. "Favorite" is AmE.


32

The expression is '... raining cats and dogs'. I have never heard of it raining dogs and cats. But this is an expression, which a) is not meant to be taken literally and b) only holds when the 'cats and dogs' are taken as one (grouped) item '... are as physically different as dogs and cats'. In this sentence, the dogs and cats are not grouped, but are ...


32

No. I have been waiting for you for 6 hours. It is now 7:00, and I have been waiting for you since 1:00. It's been 6 hours since I was waiting for you. I was waiting for you until 5:00, but gave up and went home. That was 6 hours ago; now it is 11:00. (This does not indicate how long you waited for me.)


31

I’m in Chicago and most of my team is in Paris, so this is a situation I have a lot of practice with! My primary recommendation is: reference the time of your audience. However, the key fact is: anything you say nicely is fine. Typical conversations I’ve had at 8 AM my time (CST), 3 PM their time (CET): Paris: Good morning! Chicago: Good morning! ...


30

I'm not sure there's a direct female equivalent, but there's a gender-neutral expression with a similar meaning and level of vulgarity: Get off my ass! That being said, I think it's much more common to hear a female speaker use the original "... breaking my balls," then for her to adapt it for female anatomy. I know plenty of women who use the expression ...


26

We usually call it carry out, take out, or to go here in America. Example: Would you like that meal to go or to stay? This phrase is most commonly used when you are at a fast food restaurant, and they ask you whether you wish to dine there, or take the food with you. I also see this used if you are seated at a restaurant and you want to take home some ...


25

Both prepositions are correct but have slightly different meanings here, depending on how the author considers the bus. The interpretation also depends on context1. "On the bus" considers the bus functionally as a form of transport. "In the bus" emphasises that the bus is a place. So if I read that someone "fell asleep in the bus", my first impression is ...


25

The earliest reference to the phrase that Google has on hand is from the Los Angeles Police department's annual report in 1936. It makes a lot of sense that this could have been one of the first uses: the Model T had only been on the market for about twenty years at this point in time. Car theft was quite likely a very new crime, and Los Angeles -- among ...


25

Here in South Africa, we say "plug out" too. I am not sure if this is based on the historical European influence, or that in Afrikaans "uit prop" translates to "plug out" really... In Afrikaans, the words make sense - but I can see how it gets a little non-descriptive in English. It sounds like "rock out" (even though not really great form in my opinion ...


23

If you have no seats to trade and they would have to stand, don't even bother asking. But if you do have seats to trade, say this: "We were hoping to sit together as a family. Is there any chance you would consider trading seats with us? If so, we'd be grateful. If not, no worries." This makes a polite request without applying any pressure, so it is ...


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