13

In my experience, silverware is the most common term for metal eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons), though flatware is also perfectly acceptable. I've also heard and used cutlery to describe this set of items, though in the U.S., cutlery can also refer to kitchen knives of all kinds. Crockery is very common to refer to ceramic dish sets, also just ...


7

I love flowers This is a generic statement, and it says that you feel attraction towards flowers in general. I love the flowers Here, you are talking about some specific flowers. Eg. Flowers someone has given to you, shown you e.t.c


5

In your comment you mention that the context is: I was talking with my course mate, we were discussing the Literary Theory course and I'm quite bad at literature, the sentence was what I said In this case all you have to do is switch would and that to make: I don't like literary theory, I can't imagine what that would be like.


5

Regarding "the dishes": A dish, in my area of the USA is more often called "a plate". It is a flat, usually round thing made from plastic, glass, or ceramic that you put non-liquid food on and eat from. However, the dishes can either mean a collection of plates, (especially as compared to bowls, as in "put the dishes here and the bowls there"), but most ...


5

As per Andy's comment to your question the references you cite all include the meaning of booze to mean alcohol, an alcoholic drink or an alcoholic beverage. By definition then as wine is alcohol and beer is alcohol, the meaning of booze can include both wine and beer. So in conclusion this is really just a simple logical case as you have your ...


5

There is an historical tidbit in the US which slightly colors the definition. During "prohibition", from 1920 to 1933, the term "booze" gained more traction. Though I have no direct knowledge of the details, what I glean from movies of the era is that "booze" was more strongly associated with "hard" liquor. This is partly true because the manufacture, ...


4

I am a native speaker originally from Britain, now living in the US. I believe the British/American distinction is irrelevant. Both sentences are perfectly valid to my ears, each means the same in the UK as in the USA, but they have the capacity to differ subtly in meaning from each other. And that difference is exactly what you say. The first could be ...


4

The book is correct: it should be vegetables (plural). When it's a count noun, and it's a general statement, then the plural form is used: ✔ I don't like cars. ✘ I don't like car. ✔ I don't like movies. ✘ I don't like movie. When it's a mass noun, then the singular form is used: ✔ I don't like bacon. ✘ I don't like bacons. ✔ I don't ...


4

Normal usage would be: "Come on, it won't do you any harm!" (lose the final, repetitive 'you') but your alternative of "it won't harm you!" is also fine, though "it won't hurt you!" sounds more natural to me.


4

They are all fine except the second one, which has a different meaning: estimate can only be a noun, so the phrase estimate delivery date would have to mean "date for delivery of the estimate".


4

In the United States, there can be little practical difference between the two. "Pharmacy" is simply a formal term for what often amounts to the same thing. To be clear: A "pharmacy" is a business (or a part of a hospital) that dispenses medication. A public pharmacy does not have to sell other products, but many do because it helps them make money. ...


4

Could you please tell me when can I get my check from you? Could you please tell me when I can get my check from you? Both are acceptable although the second is far more common and sounds more natural. Neither involves two questions as I see it. "when can I" does use the inversion common in question forms, but that just emphasizes that it is a question;...


4

There are a number of written instances of (someone) took transport to (some destination), where it's important to note there's no article. If you look at the dates in that link, you'll see most of them are quite old. Also note that in such contexts, transport is effectively equivalent to transportation. It's more of an abstract than a concrete noun - ...


4

It's a metaphor from accounting. There are a lot of factors in a business's profitability, but the end result is tallying assets vs liabilities on a balance sheet, and putting the result in a line at the bottom that will tell you what it is. Likewise there are a lot of factors in the sport, but the end result telling whether you are good is your team ...


3

Your sentence is correct as it stands. "Already" can be used with the present tense: I am already in London. I already play tennis, so I'd like to learn squash. You could consider using the present perfect in your example: You have to choose an hour that hasn't already been taken by someone else.


3

The forms I kept playing videogames the whole night. I continued playing videogames the whole night. I played videogames the whole night. are all more common and more natural than "I stayed playing videogames the whole night." The word 'stayed" is more often used with something indicating state such as "stayed open" or "stayed angry", or with ...


3

In your example you consider that you have to decide how many games are there: Doom + a number >=2. However, from my point of view, you took the wrong path: you actually need to compare 2 groups: group 1: Doom (1 element); group 2: other games (2 or more). From this point of view, "between" is the best choice: A) I will emphasize the difference between ...


3

tuition refers to payment for school in American English. You pay tuition. The word you want to use here is tutoring (or similar/related forms): I go for tutoring in science. I get tutoring in science. I get science tutoring. I get tutored in science. I am tutored in science. I receive science tutoring. I have a science tutor....


3

"She is 10 months (old)". We count in months up to 1-year-old. From then there is mixed usage. It is very common for people to say "She is 18 months old", but you will also hear "She is 1 year and 2 months" or "She is 1 and ¾". For children who are 2 or older we likely to just say "She is 2 (years old)", but sometimes "She is 2 and a half". For very young ...


3

The answer to the English part of the question is that “Let’s split the check” is acceptable. We might also say “I would prefer to pay my share of the bill.” For more specific advice about how to handle the situation without seeming ungrateful, you may want to look at the Interpersonal Skills Stack Exchange site. Etiquette in specific situations is on-topic ...


3

This use of "through" with a date, meaning "up to and including" that date, is very common and wholly natural in US English. I gather it is less common in UK English. Some examples: I will be on vacation through Thursday. He will be in a meeting through 2 pm. The store will be open through the 21st. The play will run though October 15th. ...


3

It is not a sentence. It is a noun phrase - the head is the noun "survivors", and it is post-modified by a participial clause "clinging to a raft". It can be used independent in the same way that any noun phrase can be used independent, eg in answer to a question: What does this picture show? Survivors clinging to a raft. But it does not narrate ...


3

Be very leery about using the word only when giving rules about English. You wrote: you only use the proposition 'on' with nouns that refer to groups of people The three example nouns you provided – team, board, commission – indeed typically use on instead of in. However, I thought of three other nouns (there are probably a few more) that can refer to ...


3

The key difference is "US dialect". This means that, unless you are a member of a community that uses that dialect (Southern US, especially African American), you should always use the standard form "I'm going to ...". Using the dialect term would be confusing, and people will tend to assume that you have made a mistake. "fixing to" and especially "finna" ...


3

As a native (British) speaker, I would use both interchangeably. For see you could use it to refer to having sight of something: I see a ship on the water. You might then choose to use can see non-literally: I can see that this might cause trouble. If there is any difference to be sensed in everyday speech, I might suggest that see sounds a little ...


3

I have never heard anyone refer to that device as an electric egg beater, but apparently some people do: "Top 10 Best Electric Egg Beaters in 2020 Review" If you look at this ngram, you'll see that "electric hand mixer" has been more popular than "electric egg beater" since the 1970s and that "electric egg beater" is becoming ever less common. Both ...


3

The phrase "the while" indicates the pending passage of an indefinite period of time. "The While" is a nebulous (fuzzy) term, not meant to be precisely interpreted in the sense of "starting here and ending here". Instead, the phrase suggests a vague notion of unfolding time. The author could have written instead: "stands over you from now on" or "stands ...


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