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62

In fact, there is no difference between behaviour and behavior except spelling. The former is preferred in British and Commonwealth English, the latter is the American spelling. The entries are confusing because there is no single "Cambridge Dictionary." Cambridge University Press actually publishes dozens of different dictionaries. Their website, however, ...


56

Wiktionary defines the expression plug out as Irish: (Ireland, transitive, colloquial) To unplug; to remove (an electrical device) from its socket. From The Daily Edge : 13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Another uniquely Irish phrase is 'to plug out' as in ' plug out the telly'.


54

They mean the same thing; behaviour is the British English spelling; behavior is the American spelling. The definitions say the same thing in different ways.


37

I believe the most appropriate phrase would be: You look like a catfisher. That is, you look like a person who catfishes. The sentence "You look like a catfish" just makes me think someone is being compared to an actual catfish, likely as commentary about their mouth or facial hair. If you want to use the verb, a "-y" or "-ey" suffix is typically added ...


34

In America, we use the term "unplug", not "plug out"


25

Here in South Africa, we say "plug out" too. I am not sure if this is based on the historical European influence, or that in Afrikaans "uit prop" translates to "plug out" really... In Afrikaans, the words make sense - but I can see how it gets a little non-descriptive in English. It sounds like "rock out" (even though not really great form in my opinion ...


23

If you have no seats to trade and they would have to stand, don't even bother asking. But if you do have seats to trade, say this: "We were hoping to sit together as a family. Is there any chance you would consider trading seats with us? If so, we'd be grateful. If not, no worries." This makes a polite request without applying any pressure, so it is ...


20

In the very early days, movies were very short (about 10-15 minutes), so people watched several movies in a row. Even when feature films were developed, there was typically a newsreel, a short and the feature. Also, they were originally called 'moving pictures', which quite naturally became 'movies'. 'A movie' came slightly later. (I think people referred ...


19

Because, as that definition explained, "movies" in that context refers to the movie theater, which typically has several showings for a movie. If you want to refer to the showing you specifically attended, you would say "we went to a movie last night."


19

I work in north eastern Ohio, in a community of Amish people, where the first language is Dutch (not European Dutch - this would be Pennsylvania Dutch, or a regional dialect thereof). Here, I never hear native dutch speakers say "unplug." It's always "plug out." There are relatively few idioms that are unique to this area, but this is one of those that ...


16

Do you want to go to the movies tonight? Do you want to go to the cinema tonight? Both the movies (AmE) or the cinema (BrE) refer to a place where you can watch a movie (AmE) or a film (BrE). It is usually a movie theater (AmE) or a cinema (BrE). Would you like to go and see a film tonight? I thought we might get something to eat and then go to ...


15

Plurals do not require articles. If you use an article, you have a different meaning. There are apples in the bowl. The apples are red. The previously identified apples are red. Just like when used with a singular, the use of the definite article, the, indicates that you are talking about specific apples. Apples are red. This is a claim that apples, ...


13

This is a very new use of a word, and doubtless the usage is in flux. It seems that the first use was as a verb. "To catfish" (often in form "catfishing") meaning to deceive by the use of fake images on a dating site. It is sometimes used to mean "to be deceived". It should be compared with the existing term "phishing", and the non-internet meaning of "to ...


12

In short, they're the same word spelt differently in the US and the UK. It's not very obvious because of the way Cambridge has laid out their pages. behaviour noun UK US behavior behavior noun [ C/U ] CDN BR behaviour behavior noun [ U ] → behaviour Wiktionary's entries are much clearer: behaviour Alternative forms ...


12

I am from a community in New York speaking English and Yiddish and I can definitely hear myself say "plug out". I believe this happens because we tend to express things in English the same way we would in express it in Yiddish. There are many more examples where we do it. Yiddish is also somewhat derived from German.


12

"The quest for [anything]" is an established phrase. "The [anything] quest" is not, and without context it might be momentarily confusing. Otherwise there is no difference.


11

As Lambie says, drinks are either carbonated or non-carbonated. I believe these are universal terms used in government or official communication. In the US: Carbonated soft drinks are collectively referred to as soda, pop, and in some parts of the country Coke (even for carbonated drinks that are not Coca-Cola). Non-carbonated drinks are referred to by ...


11

As a general pattern, you can't say "you look X" where X is something other than an actual adjective, even if that something-else looks like or functions like an adjective in other contexts. For example: You look running. vs "A running person" You look baby. vs "A baby bird" ... As noted by James K, in this case catfish isn't adjective-like at all; it's ...


9

Most US undergraduate programs do not require an honor's thesis - it is sufficient to achieve take a specific set of courses over four years, and usually the student must maintain a grade-point average (GPA) that stays above some minimum. At my undergraduate university, there was an Honor's Program that you could be admitted to that did require an honor's ...


9

I came across this phrasing in a Supermicro server's IPMI Virtual Media interface. It looks like this: The plug in/out buttons could easily say "connect/disconnect" and have exactly the same meaning. Company is based in California, USA, but I do not know where their IPMI interface coders are located.


8

Mind has many meanings, one of which is: "to look after someone, usually on a temporary basis" The person in your example is saying that, when the teacher is not in class, they will take care of the other students in the same row to which they have been appointed as row leader. Presumably, this would require the row leader to ensure that the other ...


8

In the US, the terms "soda," "pop," and "coke" (small "c") all refer to carbonated non-alcoholic beverages, but depending on locale, only one will actually be used with regularity. In general: "Coke" is most used in the South. Note that "the South" does not extend west of Texas, despite the name. I have been advised by Southerners that, if you ask for "a ...


8

The meaning of "She upended the chessboard" is very clear to me. She suddenly lifted one side of the chessboard, causing all the pieces to be knocked over or otherwise move away from their positions. It is possible that all of the pieces fell off, and were scattered across the table and/or fell onto the floor. It is also possible that she lifted the side ...


6

You could say "Could you please move, so that we can sit together?". Be prepared, in Britain, at least, for people to consider the request rude, no matter how you phrase it, and to say "No. Go away" (or worse!), especially if they have reserved their seats, or if they would have to stand in order to accommodate you. In many countries you can reserve seats at ...


6

You can spoil or ruin a moment, an occasion, an event, a day, a vacation, or any event or period of time about which expectations were high. Both are very common; ruin is possibly stronger than spoil - you can intensify or modify either with words like "nearly", "almost", "completely", "totally", etc. Neither is 'better'. In American English the simple past &...


6

I just Googled A.J. Hoge and the answer is simple. He is an English teacher and be speaks very slowly, with pauses, and with very precise enunciation. He does this to make it easier for his students to follow him. Unfortunately, CNN make no such effort. The newsreaders and many guests will speak fast, with unclear enunciation, and with a large number of ...


6

Not a native speaker. That being disclaimed, I would say that the reports in this context are general and not specifically known from previous situation. If it'd be only a single report, you'd say "a report is coming..." but since it's multiple instances of it, we can omit the.


6

The important thing here is to differentiate between definite and indefinite. That there's no article in your example sentence shows that "reports" is indefinite. Indefinite plural nouns have no article. It's indefinite because the reader doesn't already know which reports are being referred to. In subsequent sentences, we might expect to see "the reports..."...


6

To "make something about oneself" means to view a situation entirely from one's own point of view, ignoring or minimising any impact or involvement of other people. It is generally thought of as selfish behaviour. Example: Person1: "I looked dreadful at John's funeral. It was raining, I got soaking wet and I just felt a mess". Person2: "Wow, you'...


5

In the American dialect: Bell pepper: a large, "sweet", not-spicy pepper. Capsicum: We don't really use this word except in a scientific sense. Chilli/Chili/Chile (there are a few different spellings): a spicy pepper, usually small. Usually used with "pepper", as in "chili pepper". When the word is used alone, it usually refers to a dish made of ...


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