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Is the expression “Don't care a fiddlestick” often used in American English?

That isn't a phrase I've ever heard. I think it would sound wrong to most English speakers. However, there might be some historical basis for it. A "fiddle stick" is an alternate term for a ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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Is the expression “Don't care a fiddlestick” often used in American English?

Hardly ever used. I've search for uses of it, and I've found one example (excluding dictionaries) and that is by the Kaiser of Germany, 120 years ago. There are also a few examples from non-native ...
James K's user avatar
  • 220k
-1 votes

defecating on a toilet or in a toilet

The issue is not what preposition to use, but rather what you mean by "toilet." If with "toilet" you refer to the toilet seat/bowl (the usually ceramic device people use to relieve ...
mockingjay's user avatar
0 votes

Is the phrase “target improvement” commonly known and used?

If it were "targeted improvement" I wouldn't have blinked at all, but I find "target improvement" very jarring. To me, "target improvement" is somehow trying to better a ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
0 votes

Is the phrase “target improvement” commonly known and used?

Goal Setting Performance is what sports is all about. To improve performance, the athlete sets goals. You set yourself goals that when achieved improve your performance [sorry for the repetition]: ...
Lambie's user avatar
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0 votes

"I'll get do something" or "I'll get doing something"

I will offer this answer to complement Astralbee's answer, which focuses on the grammar. Usually to get set up involves the configuration of something. The roadies of a rock band might need to "...
TimR's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

"I'll get do something" or "I'll get doing something"

"Set up" can function as: a verb phrase, as in "I will set up". an adjective phrase, as in "I am set up". a noun phrase (often hyphenated), as in "that's a nice set-...
Astralbee's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it correct to use first person, second person, and third person in a sentence?

Yes, English does not have any problem using first person, second person, and third person all in the same sentence. It is acceptable to do so. This commonly comes up when talking to someone about ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
-1 votes

Go from left to right or Go left to right?

I'd drop "going". "From left to right, they are..." "In order from left to right, they are..." "In reading order, they are..." (This is useful if you have ...
Kaia's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

How to ask for the answer "I'm the third year of PhD"?

Imagine the following conversation: -- What do you do? -- I'm a student. -- What year are you in? The reply would probably contain the information you need. The UK has 3 year undergraduate degrees, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 220k
2 votes

How to ask for the answer "I'm the third year of PhD"?

I don't know of any one-sentence question that would likely result in that response. Well, other than linking two questions with "and" or some such. A likely conversation would go like this: ...
Jay's user avatar
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