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1

For many purposes, "smear": and "smudge" have pretty much the same meaning. When it is done intentionally with makeup, I would use "smudge". When is is done intentionally by a a painter using oil pain, I would use "smear". When refering to a situation like that in the image, I would use "run" rather than either "smear" or "smudge: Your tears have caused ...


3

Your sentence is correct as it stands. "Already" can be used with the present tense: I am already in London. I already play tennis, so I'd like to learn squash. You could consider using the present perfect in your example: You have to choose an hour that hasn't already been taken by someone else.


1

To me turn a bike suggests picking up a stationary bike, and putting it down facing the other way. The word I would use for causing a moving bike to change direction is steer, not turn.


3

The forms I kept playing videogames the whole night. I continued playing videogames the whole night. I played videogames the whole night. are all more common and more natural than "I stayed playing videogames the whole night." The word 'stayed" is more often used with something indicating state such as "stayed open" or "stayed angry", or with ...


0

If the bike is going west, and you want it to go east instead, you could ask: Do you know how to make a U-turn on a bike? A U-turn is a 180 degree change in the direction of a vehicle's motion. Unless the vehicle can "turn on a dime", the path of the vehicle's motion is shaped like a capital letter "U". If it is clear from the context that you are ...


1

You could say: Sorry to call so late, but we really need those TPS reports. Sorry for keeping you up, the server went down and we need help getting it back up. Hi Alice, I hope I didn't wake you, but aliens are invading and we're having some trouble finding the instructions for the anti-alien ray gun.


1

No, using to take is not a natural way of expressing one's college major in AmE. Note also that "college" is not capitalized unless it's part of the formal name of an institution (e.g., "Dartmouth College"). I took physics in college. This means that I enrolled in one or more physics classes, but leaves my major unspecified. I majored in physics in ...


1

Because none of the others result in a grammatical sentence. Gilbert Stuart is considered by most art critics that he was greatest portrait painter North America contains. "that he was greatest" does not work, neither does "is considered ... that" Gilbert Stuart is considered by most art critics as he was greatest portrait painter North America ...


2

Well, Frank Thomas has already answered in a comment but According to the Cambridge Dictionary fan someone who admires and supports a person, sport, sports team, etc He's an avid football fan. Just replace "football" by "baseball" in the example. There is even a movie starring Robert DeNiro about a baseball lover titled The Fan.    &...


0

"Baseball fan" would be the obvious expression, but there is nothing wrong with "baseball lover". The noun would be "baseball maniac". I wouldn't use that. It sounds like someone who is actually insane


2

If you are speaking literally, "in" usually carries the meaning of "surrounded by", or "completely enclosed": "There's a fly in my soup." "The dog is in the doghouse." "I made an error in that sentence." and "on" implies "attached to" or "touching": "I wish I were a fly on the wall." "They were on bikes." "We put another coat of ...


2

Both are correct. It depends on what you are trying to say. "The other" implies that there are already exactly 23 other speeches prepared. "Another" implies that there could be any number more speeches and you are prepared to listed to only (or up to) 23 more. Please also note that your title and main text do not align. We are prepared to hear ...


1

Yes In AmE, I hear "rooting for" far more often than "support" in this sense, and I pretty much never hear "supporters" used to mean "fans of". But "Which team are you a fan of" is more common yet. From my reading, "support" and "supporters" are indeed common in BrE. Oddly, "support" is used quite often in AmE is similar but non-sports contexts: I ...


0

I would say that either There was an anthill among my roses, violets, and tulips. or There was an anthill between my roses, violets, and tulips. could be acceptable. If there were three separate groups of flowers, say in a triangular arrangement, and the anthill is in the middle, I would use "between". If they were all mixed, I would use "among". I ...


0

I am afraid that, as the EngVid page on Gerunds and Infinitives listed by FumbleFingers says, this is simply an arbitrary rule of usage. I disagree with a few of the statements on the page. but I agree with its general point nd with most of the specific classifications given there, and i can't advance any systematic criterion for which verbs take an ...


2

Things went to pot. CED Interestingly, this originates from when food was scarce, people would leave the bones, fat and undesirable portions behind after eating their meal. These second-rate items would be used for soup the next day, so as such, the poor-quality leftovers would "go to pot". Things went to sh*t. Obviously the latter being slightly ruder!...


0

The origins of the saying are military and refer to marching at double speed. Actually, the British English idiom is "at the double" - "on the double" appears to be the American variant. So it isn't really "old fashioned" as it may still be used in the military, however military jargon found its way into common speech more in the past when people were ...


1

"between is just for two objects" This is not quite correct. "Between" can indeed be used for just two objects.(or groups) But it can also be used for sets being compared in pairs. For example: There is a significant difference between parents and children. This can be thought of as a comparison of two groups, or as a pairwise comparison of each parent ...


3

In your example you consider that you have to decide how many games are there: Doom + a number >=2. However, from my point of view, you took the wrong path: you actually need to compare 2 groups: group 1: Doom (1 element); group 2: other games (2 or more). From this point of view, "between" is the best choice: A) I will emphasize the difference between ...


0

They are both correct, and mean exactly the same thing. I can certainly envisage situations where “one hundred” would be preferred; for example, in response to a question such as: Q. Did Cruella de Ville steal one hundred and one Beagles, or two hundred and one? A. One hundred. And it was Dalmatians you idiot, not Beagles. Or, by contrast: Q. ...


0

It is extremely easy: the s or es is only ever in the third person singular of a verb in the present tense, except the verb be. Third person is: It/He/She. Structure of types of sentences: Declarative: It sounds right. Negative: It does not sound right. [doesn't] Interrogative: Does it sound right? It follows the rule except you have to know how to ...


3

tuition refers to payment for school in American English. You pay tuition. The word you want to use here is tutoring (or similar/related forms): I go for tutoring in science. I get tutoring in science. I get science tutoring. I get tutored in science. I am tutored in science. I receive science tutoring. I have a science tutor....


1

As an native American-English speaker, I can say that "egging on" is quite common. When said in conversation, it is readily understood without explanation. It's also very common in literature as well. This phrase is very natural in American-English. "Egging on" and "talking into" can have different connotations. When you "egg someone on" it's usually to ...


3

They are both grammatically correct, but they can have subtly different meanings. "I'm not Lord Ram" means that they are not the person named "Lord Ram". "I'm no Lord Ram" can also literally mean they aren't Lord Ram, but more often is used to imply that they are very different from Lord Ram in some way. I have some basic medical knowledge, but I'm no ...


0

Both sentences are grammatically correct. They mean different things. The first sentence: I'm no Lord Ram. means that "I" am different in an important way from "Lord Ram". Perhaps "Lord Ram" is much more powerful, or much wiser, or knows much more about the subject of the conversation. Or perhaps the difference is one of aptitudes or morals: "...


2

Carrying coal[s] to Newcastle is known in the U.S., but at this writing I cannot recall the last time I have actually heard it come out of anyone's mouth, either in real life or in films or television (I have lived almost my entire life in Southern California and the Mid-Atlantic region). I do see it from time to time in writing and in foreign usage. The ...


1

Carrying coals to Newcastle. Is familiar to me, but although I am a US native, I have read a lot of works of BrE This that should be understood widely might might include: Bringing sand to the beach. Bringing sand to the Sahara. Taking ice to Antarctica Importing gold to South Africa. None of these have the idiomatic status of "coals to ...


1

Many have suggested that this points to a activity in futility whereas it is actually a comment on the lack of necessity. I was born and raised in RI and have been familiar with this phrase all of my life. I believe that those from the East coast (especially New England) would have a greater familiarity. I grew up in a home where coal was delivered through a ...


0

"done by", usually but not always in the phrase "hard done by", can mean "treated" or "used". "Hard done by" means "unfairly ill-treated". It is possible that the sentence Have you ever felt done by... was using this sense, but without more context one cannot be sure of that. (I have seen "well-done by", but not often, and "doing well by" or "doing ...


2

The sentences are OK and natural. Take care with the preposition. You square up to someone you are ready to fight, and square up with someone you owe money to, or for something you have received but are yet to pay for.


1

Syllabification side point This is a side point, but one thing to keep in mind is that even with a short i sound, "decode" would not be pronounced like "Dick-oh-d". You may have heard a rule about "short" vowel sounds being grouped with a following consonant, but that rule only applies when in syllables that have some degree of stress. A short vowel sound ...


5

When using the English language "always" is very rarely applicable. You will invariably find an exception to any rule. However, where the prefix de- is being used to indicate removal of something, as in your examples, the pronunciation is with a long vowel dee-. This applies in most regional variants of English. If the word simply starts with de, for ...


1

He left, although I begged him not to. He left, but I begged him not to. He left, and I begged him not to. These three sentence do not have the same meaning, and the first is far more natural than the other two. The first means "He left, in spite of my begging him not to." In short the begging did not have its expected or desired effect. The second ...


1

While it is quite possible to say "bun up your hair". I've never heard this exact phrase before and the natural alternative is "put your hair up into a bun". The only concern I'd have with "bun up your hair" is that it could be misheard as "bung up your hair" or "bum up your hair". So given the choice, I'd stick to "put your hair into a bun" and not verb ...


0

I just saw in library Cambridge's grammar book in which I read in section Difference between American English and UK English that with "just" in UK English go present perfect but in American English go past simple: UK English = Your father has just told me. American English = Your father just told me.


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