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0

Said of = said about them (good or bad). Said for = said in their favour. "That idea has a lot to be said for it" (it's a good idea).


0

Out of context The test does not mean as much to her. simply is wrong. Context could supply something to compare to, but as it stands, it's comparing to nothingness. The test does not mean much to her This works because it's absolute.


0

Either one is fine in terms of grammar and meaning, and they mean the same thing. "shit" (and therefore "bullshit") is considered slightly ruder and more offensive than "crap", but neither are very offensive in normal circumstances.


1

Your examples don't seem to require "do" or "does". We would normally only include "do" or "does" either to confirm, contradict or contrast a previous question or statement. For example: Q. Do you remember that day? A. I do remember that day. I don't remember much from last year but I do remember that day.


0

Well it's contemporary slang, and it's mostly American English. Some I was already aware of, and some not. The one I did not know was "word" meaning got it = understood or agreed. What's the problem? That in 10 years time no one will be saying these slang expressions? Maybe or maybe not. You can never know for certain. What I can say is young ...


1

"But let me assure you, this, like any story worth telling, is all about a girl." This sentence uses parenthetical commas (although I think you missed one out of your quotation). This is worth noting because many people are more familiar with the use of brackets for parenthesis, and replacing them can often make the sentence clearer and easier to ...


0

To me, "ruined an occasion" would be more complete — a real 100% wreckage — whereas "spoiled an occasion" would connote hitting hard at the purpose or joy of the occasion but not necessarily wiping out all its value so completely. A subtle distinction, perhaps, but sometimes useful and important. Backed up by the following research: Ruin ...


0

Can refers to ability. If you can do something, you're able to do it--it doesn't mean you will do it, or have to do it, but you are able to do it. Must means not having a choice to do something. If you must do X, you don't have a choice not do X. Keep in mind modals in English are often "misused" for politeness and authority-deference purposes. ...


2

The first examples are what is called the epistemic use of the modals "can" and "must": they're saying things about the speaker's knowledge and expectations, not about possibilities or powers in the real world. They both say "I am sure that" or "I conclude that" it isn't broken. Certainly can't is more likely there in ...


0

If you are talking about this sentence is correct, yes, it is. The book is too boring for me to continue reading it. This phrase meets all grammar and orthographic rules.


-1

This is a completely commonplace joke in English: Note that each time you make the joke, you do it with something different. It sounds funny with any cheap item you can think of. "With what you've got and one dollar you buy a whole donut." "What you've got and 10 cents is worth one whole toothpick." "What you've got and two bucks ...


1

It's the same as: Regardless of the direction in which the entrepreneur decides to take the business, it's important to note, it's not a permanent decision. It's grammatically correct and perfectly acceptable, but you're not alone in finding it odd. This usage is called the dangling preposition which is frowned upon by purist linguists.


7

I assume this is set in New York. The E train is the name of a New York subway line (it runs from downtown Manhattan to Queens). The cost of a ticket is $2.50 (or rather "was" from March 3, 2013 – March 21, 2015, as the cost now is $2.75) The woman is being sarcastic. She is insinuating that the man has no evidence. She says "with what you ...


0

Asked here is a passive participle; it has no tense. Many verbs have different forms for the p.p. and the past tense, for example done versus did; but in many more verbs the form is the same, and the two senses must be distinguished by their role in the sentence structure. Participles are often used as adjectives: a stolen car, for example. How did the car ...


0

In your case, "asked" is not past tense, it is future perfect.


0

It's another way of saying "You're one of Tom's friends, aren't you?" The 's is the possessive.


2

It doesn't stand for anything: it is simply the possessive clitic exactly as in Tom's friend. There is an unobvious rule in English that though we say my friend and Tom's friend we don't normally say *a friend of me or *a friend of Tom. The idiomatic phrases are a friend of mine and a friend of Tom's". I hesitate to say the other forms are ...


0

It could be because the use of the passive voice for the second sentence reduces clarity slightly and takes emphasis off of the subject of the sentence. If someone says Ten people tested positive today. The emphasis is on the subject since the sentence is in the active voice. If someone says Ten people were tested positive today. The use of the passive ...


0

Who and whom aren't supposed to be interchangeable - "who" is a subjective pronoun, while "whom" is an objective pronoun. In other words, if it refers to the subject of the sentence, use "who"; if it's the object of the verb or a preposition, then use "whom". In your example "I" is the subject, and the person ...


0

It isn't exactly uncommon but it's moving in that direction. "should", e.g. "He should go." rather than "He ought to go.", is the more common phrasing.


0

Yes, they are common. "That is something we ought to do." "You ought not think about it from that angle."


2

1. Do not use Disconfirm Disconfirm: [Merriam-Webster] : to deny or refute the validity of Up until reading this question, I didn't even know that disconfirm was a word, and I have a fairly large vocabulary. It's simply not something I've ever encountered or used before. The word used far more often, as mentioned in the definition, is deny. Google Ngram ...


1

From an English language point of view, "disconfirm" does not mean to cancel a previously given confirmation - it means to disprove something previously held to be true. In a real-life setting, if someone "confirmed" their attendance at an event, the subsequent reversal of that decision would simply be a "cancellation". I did ...


0

It means to deny or refute the validity of something, so, in response to your question, it does not necessary cancel a point of view; it merely suggests that it is not correct. I've never seen this construction in general use (maybe I should get out more) but all the instances I can find on the web are set in quotations or italics, suggesting it has yet to ...


-2

Quote: "At school means the person is literally, physically, inside the school. ... In school means the person is studying in general (usually at college or university) but not necessarily inside the school building at that moment. “My husband doesn't have a job because he's in school." End of quote. Source: Espresso English


1

Prepositions of place are a nightmare for learners so I will limit this to your specific question. Generally, whatever happens within the perimeter a particular institution can be said to happen 'in' or 'at' that place. So, in that sense they are interchangeable. 'At' may also refer to events that happen outside the perimeter, such as the area just ...


2

Prepositions are hard. Any rule about prepositions is plagued with exceptions. "At" usually introduces the idea of a place or a time At the park or At noon "In" usually introduces the idea of containment. Put the milk in the refrigerator Come in out of the rain. A school is both a building and a place so either preposition may be ...


0

'On the way' means 'during the journey'. We use 'to' if we want to say our destination Example : Let's stop for lunch on the way. When we were on the way to France, we met Lucy! On the way' can also mean 'getting closer to a goal'. Example : Your parcel is on the way. (It's on its journey to you by post.) 'In the way' means 'taking up the ...


6

If you want to talk about "the people called 'Souza'", they are "The Souzas" (plural), and so if you must you can say "the Souzas' house" (again plural). As a question, "How many houses do the Souzas have". You use "do" because "the Souzas" is plural. Its possible to use "Souza" attributively and say "How many houses does the Souza family have?" This ...


7

First, the second paragraph in your question is incorrect. If you're talking about individual ownership, the apostrophe goes after each person's name: Those are Lucia's and John's cars, respectively. If they both own the same car, then you put the apostrophe only after the last person's name: That is Lucia and John's car. You can't mix up the two ...


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