New answers tagged

0 votes

Different ways of using - short of money

To some extent this question is asking for an opinion. If someone said to me 2 "I am short of money" I would think they have insufficient funds to meet their current financial commitments, ...
user avatar
0 votes

How would native speakers express “let‘s start to analysis the next problem“

It is not entirely clear what the intention for this is. So it seems that it is either “let‘s start the analysis of the next problem“ where "the analysis" can be a noun meaning the more ...
user avatar
0 votes

needs some work doing/done

This sounds very odd to me. I would have said: The house needs some work done on it. However, after doing a bit of "research" I have come to the (sad) conclusion that it is a less common but ...
user avatar
  • 1,388
1 vote

If some sentence has truth, could it be called sarcasm

No, this is not sarcasm. Sarcasm is when you mean the opposite of what you say, and it's negative or hurtful towards someone. In your example sentence, although sending that message to someone may be ...
user avatar
  • 13.8k
2 votes
Accepted

If some sentence has truth, could it be called sarcasm

Not really. Sarcasm is when you say something, but mean the opposite, for humorous effect, in order to mock/criticise or poke fun at someone. It's not always intended as an insult, although it could ...
user avatar
  • 2,052
1 vote

can any grammatical rule show what is the right assertion being said here?

The headline seems to be worded poorly, because the antecedent of "his" is ambiguous. The pronoun might refer to either "Giuliani" or "Trump".
user avatar
2 votes

"to the east" without "of something"

As pointed out by @Kate Bunting: In your second and third diagrams, the car park is not between the Hall and the trees. From a more general point of view, we can perhaps come up with three scenarios:...
user avatar
  • 1,388
0 votes

Is it rude to say you would not know what it is

The phrasing in your question taken literally means the interviewer asked you a question, and that you don't think the person you're speaking to knows what that question is. But that's rather obvious ...
user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Do i have to release the k pronunciation in the word "picture"?

When pronouncing this consonant cluster in AmE, use your tongue to stop the air in the manner of a /k/ but do not continue to the fricative portion of that sound. (If this fricative portion of the ...
user avatar
0 votes

What is the definition of write across?

To do "writing across identity lines" would be for a member of one group to write from the point-of-view (PoV) of a member of a different group, or to write descibing what things are like ...
user avatar
  • 32.4k
1 vote

What is the definition of write across?

The conversation which is linked discusses people of one 'identity' (e.g. Black, Asian, white, Mexican, American, British) writing about the lives, feelings, experiences, etc, of people of a different ...
user avatar
0 votes

Is it okay to drop the "t" in "doesn't" in an American accent?

Speech as in the example is not a general feature in American English. "American accent", however, is not a single accent, but many. For example, among speakers of African-American ...
user avatar
  • 1,701
2 votes
Accepted

Is it okay to drop the "t" in "doesn't" in an American accent?

As a Brit who really only knows American English from TV, I'd have thought they would more commonly elide to don't, in a similar fashion as ain't from isn't [even though it could be argued they are ...
user avatar
1 vote

Is it okay to drop the "t" in "doesn't" in an American accent?

This is due to "elision": the omission of a sound or syllable when speaking (as in I'm, let's) Lexico But "doesn't" is always more commonly used. You can use doesn' in day to day ...
user avatar
  • 5,569
1 vote

The answer to the question "where do you go to school?"

The correct but unavailable answer is Rosario. Second best is at Rosario, based on the full answer of I go to school at Rosario. However, including a preposition with the answer is unneeded and ...
user avatar
  • 7,303
5 votes

Usage of the word dawn

"Dawn" (or "dawn on") doesn't mean "understanding," but rather "the beginning of understanding." It is similar in meaning to "epiphany" or "...
user avatar
  • 321
2 votes

The answer to the question "where do you go to school?"

Assuming that 'Rosario' is the name of the school, and that the answer is just those two words, then the correct answer would be "to Rosario". It would be correct to say "I go to ...
user avatar
  • 73k
2 votes

"In which ocean are The Bahamas?" or "In which ocean are The Bahamas located?"

Located is completely unnecessary in your questions. Not ungrammatical, not an inappropriate word; but it's cumbersome, and suggests that you're desperately trying to make yourself sound important. ...
user avatar
  • 64.1k
0 votes

Meaning of "be getting "

The basic meaning of get in all these examples is become, or change state into. We are getting prepared -> We are taking action to become prepared We are getting married -> We are (arranging ...
user avatar
  • 64.1k
1 vote

What does it means to be "X whisper"?

Democratic Whispers of ‘No’ Start to Rise. means: There are democratic whispers of the answer to the question "Should Biden Run in 2024". These whispers are the word: no. whisper is speaking ...
user avatar
  • 35.4k
1 vote
Accepted

Do "on, wrong, wander" have the exact same vowel?

British RP-speakers use /ɒ/ in all three words. The word "wonder", on the other hand, is pronounced with /ʌ/. @OldBrixtonian People in the western half of the United States are extremely ...
user avatar
  • 5,569
6 votes

IS "rose by" correct instead of "rose to"?

It's a difference in meaning: Rise by x: new price = old price + x Rise to x: new price = x "rising to" denotes the target and "rising by" the way to get there. The origin ...
user avatar
  • 291
1 vote

Is it a redundant phrase?

To slam something shut is to close it with a lot of force, often resulting a loud noise or shock. To give a few examples: He put the bag in the back seat and slammed the car door shut. After seeing ...
user avatar
  • 1,663
5 votes

“If you are rested I would go,” I urged. Meaning?

You are correct, "I would" is a shortening of "if I were you I would." This is a less common sense of the word would: OED has it as a verbal phrase, P7 in "will," v.1, (...
user avatar
  • 1,663
3 votes
Accepted

“If you are rested I would go,” I urged. Meaning?

More like "I would recommend that you go" or "I think you should go" than "I would go if I were you." The use of "urged" suggests the former meaning. ...
user avatar
  • 6,461
2 votes

Can I flip these words and keep the gist?

The past participles known and argued are far more common than struggled after long, so let's check the usage figures for those... Note that this use of "fronted" adverbial long before the ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Can some one be a bygone?

I would say 'no', "You are from a bygone era." would be fine, but it's not a word I would use applied to people. Well, not living people.
user avatar
2 votes

How to talk and what phrases to use in English (in person) to a supervisor on her last day at work, who is steping down, and wish her good luck?

There are no magic words. You might start with "Good luck", and then it is more or less up to you. Do you know what she is going to do next? Then wish her luck for that: "Good luck ...
user avatar
  • 149k

Top 50 recent answers are included