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0 votes

Ability in the future: Can vs Will be able to?

Only the answer to Q11 is wrong. It should be "will be able to pay." You don't have the money right now so you don't have the ability to pay. You will only gain it in the future. It's not a ...
Chien Te Lu's user avatar
0 votes

An "s" at the end of "toward", "inward", "forward", "backward", "outward", "upward", "downward"

[…] [Is it] true that an "s" at the end of such adverb as […] "toward" […] is a choice of British English only? No, it is standard in BE, but may (and does) appear in other ...
0 votes

Is there a problem in learning American English and British English at the same time?

They are both the same language. It shouldnt matter. I will tell you that American-exclusive words are used in Britain more than Britian-exclusive words are ever used in America.
Megas's user avatar
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0 votes

An American expression for "a packet of crisps"

In America, people would say "a packet of chips", but only if they are in a bag. The picture you showed would be "a bowl of chips".
Megas's user avatar
  • 313
0 votes

When can we omit the article in front of a countable word in singular?

There's a difference in structure with and without the, there. ... the government of former Argentinian president Peron. ... the government of the former Argentinian president, Peron. In the version ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
0 votes

I'm going to the SHOPS vs I'm going to the STORE (UK vs. US)

In USA, both shop and store are used, though shop is mainly for smaller places, while store is for larger places. Shops is used in UK as the equivalent of what Americans would call a "mall", ...
Megas's user avatar
  • 313
5 votes

What does this quote from "Mr. Dooley" mean?

The author of that remark lived most of his life in the 19th century. His English is somewhat old fashioned. Consider this bit of hype about a (fictitious) new audio technology: Our Super Duper ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
6 votes
Accepted

What does this quote from "Mr. Dooley" mean?

It just means that reading is a good way of resting the mind. The fictional Mr Dooley claims that the only better way of resting is to go to bed! If you are reading an enjoyable book, you are 'in' ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.2k
6 votes

what does this phrase mean "placed on her end"?

When an object is rectangular, that is, longer than it is tall, to "place it on its end" means to place it so that the short end is on the ground or floor or table, and it extends upward the ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k
12 votes

what does this phrase mean "placed on her end"?

The author is attempting to provide a sense of the Titanic's massive scale by way of comparison between the ship's length and a tall building's height. Normally, a ship would be oriented horizontally ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
0 votes

tap, faucet, tap water, faucet water

You could say "faucet water" and people will understand you, but most stick with "tap water" there. Also, people there do say "tap" a lot as "faucet" is a fancy ...
Megas's user avatar
  • 313
8 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

I'm going to disagree with most of the answers here. It's hard to imagine a context where "good luck finding a new job" doesn't have a negative tinge to it. There's something idiomatic ...
JimmyJames's user avatar
  • 1,419
7 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

Frame challenge: "...finding a new job" is the problem. I'd replace with "Best wishes for your future". I'd also avoid email is at all possible, as your way of speaking says more: ...
Simon Crase's user avatar
5 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

The other answers at this point in time1 have largely not addressed the formal requirement of keeping2 the gerund "finding". So, to that end: Finding a new job can be challenging in these ...
Nick Gammon's user avatar
  • 1,130
1 vote

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

I would just say ; "Best wishes for your future endeavours." It is not necessary the person would be doing another job, maybe he want to take a break, or maybe create his own business or ...
Vivek Kumar's user avatar
4 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

"Good luck finding a new job" isn't always, or even usually, sarcastic. It's very context dependent. If the person you are writing to knows you as someone who wishes them well, and ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,731
17 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

Context is Everything. "Good luck finding a new job" can indeed be read as sarcastic. By itself, that's probably how it will be read. "I was so happy to work with you. You taught me ...
fectin's user avatar
  • 790
-1 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

Best of luck finding a new job. Best of luck with your job search. I have never heard "best of luck" used sarcastically. P.S. In American English
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
19 votes

If "Good luck finding a new job" is sarcastic, how do I change the sentence to make it sound well-intentioned?

I don't think 'Good luck finding a new job' is necessarily sarcastic and not a well-intentioned wish. As @Michael Harvey rightly said. It depends on the situation and our tone. Some interpretations ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

What are these structures called in American and British English?

In my over four decades of working “behind the fence,” we called the buildings guard shacks and the liftable obstacles gates, barriers, or arms. But see this Wikipedia article.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
0 votes

Is Canadian English considered more as American En or as British English?

The correct answer to this is that unless you are in the Canadian province of Quebec, it is literally the same language as what US and British speak. Now, if you are asking whether people in Canada ...
Megas's user avatar
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