New answers tagged

1

Here is the actual title from the New York Times article. At Axel Springer, Politico’s New Owner, Allegations of Sex, Lies and a Secret Payment Axel Springer is a company, and at indicates a place... in this case, a place of work.


1

Your title is more natural than the quote in the body of your question. It is more idiomatic to say "carry [object] with you" than to say "carry with you [object]." The second version is not, strictly speaking, incorrect, but no one talks like that. The place I could see that arrangement working is in a poem or song, either to make the ...


-1

It is a verb in this context. It's a little confusing but the direction of action is towards the speaker so the passive voice would actually be towards the objected that is being received. Received as an adjective is not standard at all, perhaps used in sentences like "The received letters were laden with neurotoxins" but the more idiomatic way ...


-1

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the verb substitute has different meanings depending on whether it is transitive or intransitive. This is clearly stated in the American English entry, and is covered by the separate substitute for entry for British English. All of the following sentences are correct and describe the same situation: The manager ...


2

It is idiomatic. You may consider "start back" to be a compound word and a phrasal verb, meaning to "return and restart". Although idiomatic, it is also rather informal. A more formal phrasing could be "Children returned to school..."


1

Does it can is ungrammatical. The correct question is Can it? Can it show multiple items [or more than one item] on each sheet? Answer: Yes, it can. Yes, it can do that or do so would be correct, but rather formal.


0

That is a headline, and follows the abbreviated style of headlines. "Spring 2022" is a compound noun in this headline. You can understand it to mean "Spring [of] 2022". In giving dates, the year normally comes at the end: "The 14th of May 2022" or "May 14, 2022". You would not move the year before the season.


1

The word accommodating doesn't incorporate the intensifier, though it's a good word. Consider that you can say "You have been very accommodating." A word that won't accept an additional intensifier is indispensable. It's not exactly the same as helpful, but it might fit some situations.


0

I want to express that there was a lot of work and so I couldn't look into some other things You may use such expressions as I'm up to my ears in work I'm buried in work* I'm overloaded with work I'm stretched/spread thin (at work). As for the use of "swamped", you may be swamped with new customers. Also, you may be snowed under with (numerous) ...


0

Generally the second usage is more appropriate in natural context. "Overwhelmed with work" might be better if you talking to non native speakers. The first usage is wordy and might confuse someone.


1

We can introduce the topic of a completed action or event with 'Once' and a verb phrase, e.g. 'those machines are down', 'the monster was dead'. We can omit 'once' and the verb, so 'The machines down, we can [do something]', or 'The monster dead, we were able to escape'.


2

The article is written by a man. 'Let's' is a contraction of 'let us'. 'Us' here refers to the author himself and all other men. The writer is saying 'Female soccer players will no longer tolerate abuse. Let us (men) stop giving it to them'. To 'dish out' is literally to serve food onto plates before a meal, and figuratively to issue or dispense something in ...


1

I say the second sentence is correct. The first sentence is with "in", therefore "in" would possibly be misinterpreted to be walking "inside" a tree. But if I where you. I would prefer to say: I walked in the forest, looking at the sunlight falling through the leaves above me. Or "between": I walked between the ...


1

Asking for your feelings about something in this kind of context is really an invitation for you to describe your feelings or relationship to it. In the same way that you might describe your feelings towards a person by saying "I love them!" you might say the same about a type of food - "*I love it!" Saying "I feel awesome" is a ...


0

All of the example sentences you give could mean you did the work yourself, and two of them can only mean you did the work yourself, BUT the structure you give in the title is not the structure of those sentences. The structure in the title, [ Subject + "get" + object + past participle ], is called causative, and it always means someone else did ...


1

No "He gets woken" does not mean "he wakes up" but rather "someone awakens him". "He gets awake" sounds wrong to a native speaker. It might possibly mean "He becomes awake" or "he wakes up" as in After the light shies on his face, he gets awake gradually. but it is still a strained and unusual ...


2

No, you cannot change the order and keep the meaning. Unlike some other languages (most notably Latin), most English nouns are not inflected. Whether a particular noun is a subject or direct object or indirect object is entirely dependent on its placement in a sentence; its form remains the same regardless. He keeps telling me a truth. ...means "he ...


4

In American English, "on sale" can have either meaning depending on the context. The context is generally whether you would already expect the item to be available to be sold at that store or not. "Bananas are on sale at the grocery store." We would expect bananas to be available to be bought at the grocery store, so here, "on ...


1

"Over toward" is a colloquial phrase meaning simply "in the direction of." There is extremely little difference between "toward" and "over toward;" the one thing that "over" adds to the phrase is a vague sense of increased distance, depending on context. Otherwise it is essentially a filler word.


2

The headline is correct. Substituting "by" is incorrect. "in thrall" is a standard phrase. It can take the preposition "to", or it can be possessive. The examples given are: He was completely in thrall to her. He was completely in her thrall. Possessives can usually be rewritten in an "of" form, so you could also ...


1

✅ "What does this mean?" This is correct for the context you described. There are other things you could say, of course, but "What does this mean?" is perfectly fine for the situation. 🚩 "What is this meaning?" On the other hand, while this is technically valid and grammatical English (AmE), it's meaning is actually very ...


1

There is no missing word. We can talk about seasons of the year without using a preposition: It was cold last winter It may be warm next summer The leaves on the trees are pretty this fall ('fall' is what Americans call autumn). This 'anxious delta fall' is the fall of 2021, during which parents are anxious about their children because of the Delta variant ...


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