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1

It depends on whether you are telling a story or apologising. If you are telling a story, you want to include the details. I woke up at 9, but fell asleep again until 10 You could make the story longer with more details about the time of the meeting, when you fell asleep, why you were so sleepy etc. If you are apologising then you don't need to tell ...


1

Oral and nasal consonants [p b t d k g] are oral stops (or plosives), meaning the air is blocked at a particular place of articulation, accompanied by sudden release of the air through the mouth. [m n ŋ] are, by contrast, nasal stops i.e. a closure is made in the oral cavity at a particular place of articulation to stop the air from escaping through the ...


1

TV Show - a single block of TV entertainment shown at one time. TV Series - the episodes of a TV show, usually referring to a sequential order of shows. TV Program - the agenda, or programming, of a single channel or originator of TV shows for a single time period, usually a day. TV Guide - a guide, or listing, of competing TV programming for show ...


0

In most American accents, when a stressed syllable ends in an /n/ and the next unstressed syllable starts with a /t/, the /t/ is usually dropped. So 'COUNter' becomes counner, ˈTWEN.ty' becomes twenni, ˈWAN.ted' becomes wannid etc. I think the same happens to a /d/ in that position. The third syllable in 'in.de.PEN.dent' is stressed and it ends in an /n/, ...


0

It’s informal to use the past simple with the adverb “just”. Adverbs that connect the past to the present are often used with the present perfect. Therefore, it’s correct to use: I have just received a call from my friend. (not... I just received a call from my friend) Have you seen Alison lately? (not Did you see...) Other adverbs that are used in the ...


0

"Effing" is a minced oath. Minced oaths are a euphemism, and more specifically, are a modified version of a profane or obscene or otherwise "bad" word that should not be said in polite company. They indicate that you want to say the "bad" word, but recognize that in the current context, such a word would be forbidden, rude or ...


1

In very informal speech, this is a way of saying something will. The combination of the sounds 'm' and 'th' is not easy to say quickly, and careless speakers sometimes insert a different consonant into such words as well as leaving some consonants out.


2

"Trial lesson" would seem to be possible. "Demo session" makes me think of music tracks, recorded at home, to demonstrate a band to a music publisher. "Free trial" if you want to make it clear that there is no charge for the trial.


1

It's a stereotype that men don't care what they wear, find no value in clothes, are not interested in fashion, are oblivious to how other people dress. If you hold this belief, "a typical man" for you is one showing all/one of the mentioned characteristics. This behaviour might be irritating to someone who cares about clothes, wear clothes to ...


1

I am not into it. That is quite informal and I suspect would mostly be used by younger people I don't tutor biology That is grammatical but does not really answer the question "Are you good at biology" as you could be brilliant at it but not tutor it. That's not my area of expertise That is perfectly fine but quite formal. You would be more ...


1

It's generational ! In the early days of television TV shows were referred to as programs. In the 60s we bought the daily paper partly to have the " program guide". It was how you knew what was scheduled to be on one of your 3 channels .


0

The first sample is correct but far too many "hads." Uses past perfect (correct usage) and the "hads" nearly drove me nuts The hads were inserted by an editor on a passage from book draft: They had stopped at Fenway Park, where he had taken her picture and told her about the exciting games he had attended there. They had also gone to the ...


1

I agree with you. Perfect. I too think the same. It's rather awkward and doesn't sound natural to me. We say I think so (, too). I relate with it is incorrect. We say I can relate to that. = I understand it because I've gone through a similar situation.


1

It's flowery language, anthromorphising a meteor by suggesting that (like a royal personage appearing before the crowds) its appearance is graciously granting its viewers a view (with a little wave) before returning back into its private seclusion once more.


3

"On" a street is quite normal and correct in British English and American English Your first example is marked "British" because of the use of "the high street" (or High Street, the proper name of the central shopping street in many British towns and used generally to mean "the shops in the centre of town") The final ...


0

You could, if you wanted, say "the large family of which the house...", although this would be very formal, almost stilted. However, you absolutely can't say "the large family that its house" (at least not with the meaning you've suggested - see note below.) "Which its" and "who its" would be wrong too. The usual and ...


0

How to love in that song sounds closer to [haː ɾə lʌv] (or perhaps [həː ɾə lʌv]). It's certainly not [haʊdʌv]. The reason why the t in to sounds like d is 'flapping' (or 'tapping'). In most American accents, d and t before unstressed vowels are usually pronounced with a flap—[ɾ]—in which the tip of the tongue taps very quickly against the alveolar ridge. So ...


0

In the US, "Madam" would most commonly be used in formal letters, not speaking. I cannot think of the last time I spoke "madam" in any conversation. As others have said, whether madam is respectful or derogatory depends on the local culture, situation, and tone to the word. Having lived all over the USA, it is certainly used more in the ...


0

A servant or shopkeeper might use 'Madam'. Obsequious politeness. 'Dear Sir or Madam' is an old-fashioned but perfectly polite way to open a business letter to an unknown person. Yes, 'Madam' can also refer to a brothel-keeper. There's no practical confusion. It will be a pity if Political Correctness forces us into using a bland gender-less honorific. ...


0

It's not offensive, but here in America you'll get a funny look from her (and probably anyone within earshot) if you call a female "madam".


0

As you have observed, the dictionary definitions of 'cranky' and 'grumpy' are virtually identical. As a native British English speaker, my perception was that 'cranky' was more American, although we do sometimes use it in Britain. However, a look at Google books through the ngram viewer surprised me... This ngram shows that, in British English books only, '...


2

Madam is indeed used as a title of address, more rarely than it once was, at least in US usage. But there is a nuance not mentioned in any answer to date, which helps explain why some women have found it offensive. Madam has always been used as a title of address for fully adult, even mature women (at least that is the normal usage). Thus when young women, ...


1

Nowadays, in some milieux, it is considered offensive to call anyone anything that presumes their gender. You must not presume that anyone is male or female. In these days of ultra-political-correctness, we are supposed to ask each individual how they wish to be addressed. I have no idea what the "correct" form of address is for a stranger these ...


-1

in French, une madame is the name given to a female brothel keeper. When used without the article as in Madame Dupont or Monsieur et Madame Dupont the title becomes purely conventional and would be translated in English as Mrs.


3

In general, no, it's not insulting, but it's slightly stiff or formal — more so in American English than in British English. But the specific quote in your question is using one of the senses of the word that most people would find insulting in most cases, yes. Like many words, madam has multiple meanings/senses. The respectful one you're thinking of is: ...


0

Madame has both meanings -- a respectful title for a woman, and a woman who runs a nice brothel where the employees are treated well. We can tell from context which is meant. It helps that pimp is a more common and more insulting word for the second meaning. Using madam where you would say a job is the brothel owner meaning: "a madam", or "is ...


11

"Madam" or "Ma'am" are polite words to use when you don't know a woman's name, but need a way to refer to her like a name. They are terms of address. It is fairly formal and not very common, as in situations when you talk to someone who you don't know, you don't often need to address them. The typical example is a shop worker speaking to ...


1

This is common with writers, and you'll often see it with people like singers as well. I suppose you can think of it as putting the person's living status aside, when it's not really relevant, or if you don't want to emphasise the fact that someone's dead. When you listen to a recording of a song, the singer is performing it for you at that moment. And when ...


1

I don't think there is anything wrong with "Kant says..." (nor is the usage only American). Books continue to state things after their authors' deaths. "Kant says..." could be interpreted as "The works of Kant say...", "A book or paper by Kant says...", or "The argument set out by Kant says...". (...


50

In British English at least, it is inoffensive to use "Madam" as a form of address (equivalent to "Sir" but for women), as in "May I be of any assistance, Madam?". Americans would usually use "Ma'am" instead. But "madam" as a common noun — "a madam" — is to be avoided.


1

It means to pester or tease her. Merriam-Webster "dog" transitive verb: c: to bother or pester persistently dogged him about his grades


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