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1

I believe you answered your question correctly. Shall is asking permission, usually used more formally. A better way of translating it is: "Do you want me to open the door?" "Will I open the door?" Sounds here like a rhetorical question. But it all depends mostly on the context of usage.


0

I've upvoted @MaulikV's answer here, because although it's quite true that most people in most contexts wouldn't distinguish between compared to and compared with, I think these charts strongly suggest that historically there was indeed a tendency to use to in contexts emphasizing similarity, and with in contexts emphasizing difference. I think we can be ...


1

Whether or not anyone actually uses classical Latin today does not change the fact that classical Latin is still a thing which exists and uses the ablative. So the present tense is correct.


3

It is not a sentence. It is a noun phrase - the head is the noun "survivors", and it is post-modified by a participial clause "clinging to a raft". It can be used independent in the same way that any noun phrase can be used independent, eg in answer to a question: What does this picture show? Survivors clinging to a raft. But it does not narrate ...


1

There is no governing body that dictates what is considered right or wrong usage of the English language. Much of the usage can be agree upon, but occasionally, there is disagreement. That is the case here. Some say it's wrong; some say it's right. That's essentially what Swan is saying. Put another way, some of us could argue that those grammar books are ...


1

Michael Swan is being subtle. Yes, "disinterested" is sometimes used to mean "uninterested". So you can use it this way. But some people avoid this meaning and consider it wrong. You don't know if the person who hears you speak, or reads your writing will be a person who considers it wrong, and as a non-native speaker, you will get less forgiveness of "...


1

It is similar to the "d" sound, but the main difference is that you lift your tongue from the bottom of the mouth and touch your top teeth near the top. While your tongue is touching your teeth, you push out a very small puff of air. This air will separate your tongue from your teeth and it will help make that "t" sound. The "d" sound is similar in the ...


2

Although the sense of the two sentences is the same, there are subtle differences. The first tells you two things: 1. that Alex is not present, 2. that she is visiting her mother. The second also tells you two things: 1. that Alex is not present. 2. that she has left the premises with the intention of visiting her mother. Whether she is still on the way ...


1

The sentence as written is not correct. You can change it to: How do you feel about some people calling you "Toma-chan" in Japan? (with are removed) or How do you feel that some people are calling you "Toma-chan" in Japan? These both ask your opinion about the fact that some people are calling you "Toma-chan". I don't know the name for the ...


2

I can see why this would be confusing to you. At face value, those responses really have nothing to do with what you said to the person. Idiomatically those answers have become common, routine responses to being thanked. They are just what people automatically say to respond to being thanked when they don't want to say, "You're welcome", because it's too ...


1

By reversing the clauses, you change the order of events. In the first version of the sentence, the following happens: 1. The House initiates an inquiry. 2. Charges are laid. In the second version of the sentence, it's the reverse: 1. Charges are laid. 2. The House initiates an inquiry. (Note that in the second version, the syntax results in a ...


-1

I do not know whether either sentence is constitionally correct. Impeachment is rare. An impeachment is like an indictment; it is a list of "high crimes and misdemeanors" of which someone is formally accused or "charged" by a majority of the House of Reprentatives. So, in a constitutional sense, there does not seem to be a way that the charges in the ...


0

I think it is not possible in the sentence but if you begin with a subordinate clause you have to use a comma as in the given sentence. Before I found the best partners who help me to learn English, I had been struggling hard to find parterns If we begin the sentence with a subordinate clause we have to use the comma before the main clause. ...


0

In informal speech this is correct, however it might be more polite to say "this is John" instead of "he is", or "this is my friend John" if you are first introducing someone. To me, by saying "he is" it almost makes it seem like you are not good friends / you do not have a good relationship with each other.


0

"Easier than before" gives the impression of an immediate improvement. There was a previous situation, and then you made a change, and now the situation is easier. I got a non-stick frying pan, so cleaning up is easier than before. The sentence implies a specific change or event. Cleanup is easier than before I got the pan. By contrast, your example ...


6

I love flowers This is a generic statement, and it says that you feel attraction towards flowers in general. I love the flowers Here, you are talking about some specific flowers. Eg. Flowers someone has given to you, shown you e.t.c


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