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16

Indeed artistic or poetic language, as is often found in novels, can be hard to understand by someone who isn't yet completely fluent in the language. The incomplete sentence Through the sopping grass and down towards the river. This is an incomplete sentence, used for artistic effect. You could fill in the rest of the sentence like this: She walked ...


6

Only, in this context, is a way of emphasising that they will definitely grow stronger. It would typically be used when you know, or expect, that the people reading or hearing would hope that the opposite will happen. Your daughter is very ill, I'm afraid, and it's only going to get worse. The parents would obviously hope their daughter will get better, ...


5

The sentence is a bit loosely constructed. "Those" is clearly plural, but it is referring back to a thing that was not indicated as plural or even really as an event: "losing my temper". It might have been more clearly written as "I thought about the times I lost my temper with Mom or Linsay or Mamaw, and how those were among the few times ...".


4

The troll told the king and queen that Elsa's powers would only grow stronger. "Fear will be her enemy," he warned. The adverb "only" is called a restrictive focusing modifier. It's used here to convey the Troll's conviction that Elsa’s powers would get stronger, not remain constant, get worse, or anything else. Generally, pro-forms like "her" refer to ...


4

In some sentences, it is not possible to determine the antecedent of a pronoun with 100% certainty. This sentence is one such example. Usually the determination is based on the context of the sentence. When in doubt, the nearest sensible noun is likely to be the antecedent, but this assumption is not always correct. In this particular case and adhering to ...


4

It is the river that is "wide and brown," and it is also the river that "rippled and churned." It is also the river that "looked strong, like a muscle." So all those it's refer back to the river to which, "through the sopping grass," she's decided to go, especially on a day when "everything looked varnished and bright after the rain." As to the sentence in ...


3

Grammatically, the antecedent of which must be one of three things: A breeze ruffled the neat hedges of Privet Drive (the entire independent clause) the neat hedges of Privet Drive (a noun phrase) Privet Drive (a smaller noun phrase) To figure out which choice is best, just ask yourself which one makes sense: In this case, 1 doesn't make any sense. For 1 ...


3

Which is referred to Privet Drive, for which "the very last place you would expect astonishing things to happen" is a noun phrase describing it.


2

To whom it may concern" is a letter salutation used in business correspondence. The pronoun "it" is commonly known that its antecedent is this correspondence (cablegram, facsimile, letter, or memorandum) on which this salutation) appears. We can use "it" to refer to an unspecified or implied antecedent (The Free Dictionary).


2

Whatever follows your colon is the "antecedent." (Though in this case I guess it's a "subsequent." Consider this sentence: It's not clear to me what you contribute to this company. 'It' here clearly refers to 'what you contribute to this company." By the same token: To whom it may concern: I demand the immediate return of my red Swingline stapler. ...


2

When the pronoun it is used like that, it is known under the names of impersonal pronoun, impersonal subject or simply dummy pronoun (all these terms mean the same thing). The idea with impersonal pronouns is that they don't really refer to anything (neither animated nor inanimate objects). They're just there to make the sentence syntactically complete. As ...


2

The main sentence of your question has already been answered well by Ben who has given a quite complete answer. Reading those lines though it occurs to me that not only is the author attempting poetic licence with the incomplete sentences without predicate but that they are failing to do so in a smooth naturalistic way. From 'came back in and slung the ...


2

The present tense is used, among other things, for general statements. Plastic bags have been found; this is something that has happened, so it is in the present perfect. Sea turtles in general think that carrier bags are jellyfish and try to eat them, so that is in the present tense. This isn't to say that you couldn't use the past tense, in which case you ...


1

Analyzing this sentence linguistically requires us to ignore the particular name "Bingo" and the particular nouns "man" and "dog", and instead assume that these are generic entities that have the possession relationship, can be named, and are of the correct syntactic gender. So let us convert this sentence into There was a Klingon [who] had a brother and ...


1

It's grammatical, but it makes parsing the sentence a little difficult. When a pronoun without a previous reference comes at the start of a sentence, before the noun that it's referring to, then you need to "suspend" your understanding until after the referent becomes clear. Everything being equal, this makes parsing the sentence more difficult than it needs ...


1

Responding to your first question, yes, you are right. It does not refer to 'brutal side', rather battle it out is a phrase which means to compete with each other until there is a clear winner. Coming to your second question, the word 'even' is used to add a shock factor to the statement. "Even as" is used to refer to two actions which are going on at the ...


1

Dan Bron has correctly identified the antecedent to which and which. But let's figure out why you have the problem you describe: Would someone please identify the antecedents for the pronouns [1.] thru [3.]? The 3 nouns in front of [1.] confuse me so much as to thwart my attempts. Please explain and show all steps and thought processes; I’d like to ...


1

No, “those” does not have “the two things most human beings would choose above all” as a grammatical antecedent. The phrase is synonymous with “the things that are worst for them”. If “those” had an antecedent, there couldn't be the qualifier “that are worst for them” after the noun. Semantically, “those things that are worst for them” includes money and ...


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