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61 votes

What does `'s` mean in "What CPU's will it run on?"?

It's one way of showing plurals that is used with acronyms. It's widely-used, but whether it is correct is the subject of debate. It may be best to avoid its use in formal or professional documents. ...
LMS's user avatar
  • 5,562
45 votes

What does `'s` mean in "What CPU's will it run on?"?

Punctuation is a matter of style. Here, 's is almost certainly used to pluralize the initialism CPU, but whether this is appropriate depends on which style manual you, your editor, or your ...
choster's user avatar
  • 17.7k
26 votes

Shouldn't there be a ('s) in "University of Texas('s) Basketball Coach"?

There's no need for "'s" in that headline. "University of Texas" is a noun phrase, and here it directly modifies "basketball coach" to form a compound noun. We understand ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
19 votes

Shouldn't there be a ('s) in "University of Texas('s) Basketball Coach"?

This is in Headlinese, which often omits words with little semantic content. Your amended form is still Headlinese. A fuller form (such as you might expect to find in the article under the headling) ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
17 votes
Accepted

If I want to avoid the possessive apostrophe, could I write "John his new tires are great" instead of "John's tires are great"?

No, you cannot change "The car's new tires" to "the car its new tires", or "John's books" to "John his books", or anything like that. English simply does not ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
14 votes
Accepted

"A patients guide" or "A patient's guide"?

You need an apostrophe to mark a possessive case here. However, the possessive case doesn't refer to ownership in such examples, instead it refers to the meaning "is intended for": A patient's guide ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
12 votes

When can't we shorten It is to It's

The contraction of "is" in "it's" can only occur if the "is" is relatively unstressed, which cannot be the case when it is final in a sentence or clause. Consequently, contractions like "it's" and "I'...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
10 votes
Accepted

Sister's vs. Sisters'

"The Night Sisters" is a plural noun. Therefore the possessive form is "The Night Sisters'", adding just an apostrophe. The proper form of thre example sentence is Mary tended John throughout the ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
9 votes

"A patients guide" or "A patient's guide"?

If you use the S, it must be "A patient's guide", which implies that the guide is possessed by a specific patient, or "Patients' guide", which implies that the guide is for multiple patients. I would ...
Jim MacKenzie's user avatar
7 votes

Is it "nobody's business but the Turks" or "nobody's business but the Turks'"?

It's nobody's business but the Turks'. "Turks" is a word used to refer to the main ethnic group of Turkey and to the people belonging to that group. Because it is plural and because because ...
R Mac's user avatar
  • 757
6 votes

What does `'s` mean in "What CPU's will it run on?"?

There's a lot of argument about proper pluralization of acronyms and initialisms. Both using and not using apostrophes is an acceptable method of pluralization (depending on what resource you use), ...
Catija's user avatar
  • 25.4k
6 votes

How do I quote a word that ends with a possessive apostrophe?

The original sentence is correct, but I agree that it can look ugly. There is at least three possible solutions to this: Don't use the posessive. You could instead say: The confidence of the "...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
5 votes

"A patients guide" or "A patient's guide"?

I haven't gotten a single example of "A patients guide " over searching on Google, so "A patient 's guide " is appropriate here. It's also same for "A parent's guide " and "A student's guide " .
dz420's user avatar
  • 952
5 votes

"A patients guide" or "A patient's guide"?

Merriam-Webster's Manual for Writers and Editors says: No apostrophe is generally used today [1998. -p.a.s] with plural nouns that are more descriptive than possessive. Examples they give are "...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

"This's" instead of "this is"

When we use < 's > for has or is, this represents a contraction in the pronunciation. Instead of saying has or is as a separate word with its own vowel, we reduce the word to just /s/. This /s/ ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Can 's express plural?

This is a matter of style. In an interesting 2010 blog post that touched on this topic, one writer quoted from the style guide of the New York Times: Use apostrophes for plurals of abbreviations ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
5 votes

I'm going to the dry cleaner's - why the apostrophe S?

When the shop is named after the owner it is fairly common to use a possessive to describe it: A butcher is a person. A butcher's (shop) is a place to buy meat. A dry cleaner is a person who cleans ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
5 votes
Accepted

"I’m a 90s kid/‘90s kid/90’s kid"

This is a tough one - & it leads to a fair bit of disagreement. Strictly speaking, the first is the correct form: I am a 90s kid However, many people would say that the second can be used ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
5 votes

Shouldn't there be a ('s) in "University of Texas('s) Basketball Coach"?

As Colin Fine brings up, this is an example of maximally-terse writing. (People of my generation think of headlines in print newspapers, which could make each letter bigger and more eye-catching the ...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,474
4 votes

The possessive 's in time expressions

B) is the correct answer. I'll be there in a day or two's time. https://www.google.gr/#tbm=bks&q=%22in+a+day+or+two%27s+time%22
Cathy Gartaganis's user avatar
4 votes

Possessive apostrophe s and definite article

This sentence is rather odd out of context, but here is how I would write it, preserving the apostrophe (first quote is yours, second is mine, for comparison reasons): The value can be a constant ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 375
4 votes

Parenthesis with apostrophe, how to order and how to space?

There is no reason to put 'my friend' in parentheses. You could use either: I want to introduce my friend Adam's kid. I want to introduce the kid of my friend Adam.
Ross Murray's user avatar
  • 1,098
4 votes
Accepted

Is this ad at a barber shop worded correctly?

It is fine. "Men only" would be ambiguous. Is it a barber shop that only provides its services to men? Or are women and children not allowed in the shop? What if a man comes in with his ...
AIQ's user avatar
  • 10k
4 votes
Accepted

What does the single quotation(') in 'bout mean?

It's not a "single quotation", it's an apostrophe, which is often used to indicate omitted letters. 'Bout' is not standard English, but occurs in some dialects. There are some cases where ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
4 votes
Accepted

I was at my parents. Vs. I was at my parents'./I was at Chris. vs. I was at Chris's

Your first sentence ("I was at my parents.") does not make sense. The apostrophe in this scenario shows possessive. "I was at my parents'." is the same as saying "I was at my ...
myacorn's user avatar
  • 2,170
3 votes
Accepted

When can't we shorten It is to It's

Contractions can be used in any position in a sentence; however, homophone contractions such as "it's" and "they're" sound better when followed by another word or phrase. The reason is that the sounds ...
Aishwarya A R's user avatar
3 votes

How to pronounce "two boys' families"?

Generally (i.e. "properly"), option 2. As a general rule, the apostrophe is silent. That said, there may be situations where a native speaker would use pronunciation #1. For example, they may speak a ...
sharur's user avatar
  • 1,991
3 votes
Accepted

Why is there an apostrophe after years

The English genitive (-'s for singular nouns, -' used on plural nouns; more commonly known as the possessive) can be used in some expressions of time to associate something with the length of time. ...
Nihilist_Frost's user avatar
3 votes

What does `'s` mean in "What CPU's will it run on?"?

Because not using an apostrophe often looks ridiculous, it cannot be universally prohibited. Since it's not universally prohibited, it is sometimes allowed. For "CPU", some people prefer "CPU's" for ...
David Schwartz's user avatar
3 votes

Is it supposed to be Johns game or John's game?

If the game belongs to, was created by, is associated with, etc. John, then it calls for a possessive which is known as the genitive case. Because English does not decline nouns for case, it is ...
Giambattista's user avatar
  • 2,353

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