9

I have a different explanation. "Get the train" probably doesn't here mean "get a specific train", it means "Use the train network", the same way you would say "take the subway" in NYC or "get the tube" in London (who says "get a tube"?). For instance, if asked "How do you normally travel from ...


6

Yes, your usage is correct. "A"/"An" are indefinite articles, which are used when the subject of the article is not specifically identifiable by the reader/listener. My question was answered by a StackExchange user (as there are many StackExchange users) "The" is the definite article, which is used the subject of the article ...


4

It depends on usage, and it is difficult to list all the possible situations. In the two links you gave, the first one is in a sentence ("The X is a Y ..."), but the second one is not ("X, x on the Y River in Z province, China"). The second has no verb. Encyclopedia entries sometimes just list the subject of the article at the first, ...


3

Useful tips: Bear in mind that when a is followed by the, something specific is involved. Also, a is for a general idea but the plural countable noun can also be for a general idea. They both become "the" after their specificity is established. Just try to keep in mind: a= general, the=specific. Countable nouns are either a or plural as in: Do you ...


3

Yes, certainly. In the same way that once we have introduced a new entity by a, and then refer to that entity by the thereafter: I bought a book this morning. After lunch I picked the book up and read it. we can refer to attributes or relations of the new entity by the even in the same phrase where it is introduced: The title page of a book I bought had ...


3

All three sentences are grammatically correct, but there are different meanings. Saying someone is "a most intelligent student" compliments their intelligence, but does not compare them to any specific group of other students. Saying someone is "the most intelligent..." implies there is a specific group out of which this student is more ...


3

The use of an article would only be appropriate if a particular sample of water was being referred to. On the table is a jug of water which contains a few drops of food colouring. Fill the tumbler with the water.


2

Please read the entire answer. In English (at least in the USA, but I think elsewhere), for transportation that uses fixed routes, like trains, we normally use the. I took the train to work. There is no "specific train" being referenced, but the railway that is fixed, upon which or by which trains run on, on a fixed route. If we refer to ...


2

"The" Japanese government is the current government which (as of today) is headed by Abe Shinzō. "A" Japanese government is any of the many governments throughout history: for example the Koizumi government of 2001-2006, or the Yoshida government of the 1950s. each one is "a Japanese government". Sometimes (and in context) &...


2

"A rural area" implies there are many rural areas, and possibly separated from each other. "The rural area" implies there is one rural area, or that all of the rural areas are so close they can be confused as one single rural area. I believe both are correct. If you said to me "a rural area", I would want to ask "which ...


2

Neither is idiomatic. Native English speakers would not use those constructions. Laura was complaining either because she was not being paid at all or not being paid as much as she wanted. If the latter, she was complaining about her (low) wages. People don't complain for things; they complain about them. That's unless you use a construction like: He ...


2

Your examples are not consistent - you have added an adjective (uncanny) to the second one. This will lead to difficulties in the explanation, so I will take the examples as This program has the ability to adapt to its user. The is, in basic terms, a demonstrative adjective that is related to the demonstrative adjective that. Whereas that is used when ...


2

Both sentences are grammatically correct. "a few" means "some small number" (more than none), a positive statement. "few" means "not many", a negative statement. The last clause in both sentences starts with "so". That means that the last clause should be the result of what comes before. It doesn't make sense ...


1

@Ram Pillai I agree that before 'so', there should be a punctuation. I, however, think a more appropriate one for connecting an independent clause preceded by a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so) to another is a comma. If we prefer a semicolon, then it would be without the coordinating conjunction. I agree that 'few' is ...


1

Either is acceptable. It is both a specific opportunity (which makes the definite article appropriate) but possibly also one of many past or present opportunities (making the indefinite article also appropriate). Consider as an example: "Thank you for sending me a letter" "Thank you for the letter you sent me" In this example, you are ...


1

1 is wrong. 2 is correct IF the context had already specified which case they were discussing. 3 is correct if they were describing some murder case not specified.


1

Your first three examples don't need articles because they appear to be orders, the kind you would see on signs. Sign English is often abbreviated and does not necessarily follow the rule that a sentence must have a subject, a verb, and an object. Shipment has left seller facility and is in transit to carrier Tendered to local postal carrier for final ...


1

You might use "the" in a similar phrase when there are specific items that the set is chosen from. For example a museum might have a collection of windows from various periods and museum workers might refer to a display using some of them as "a set of the windows". Generally though there is nothing so specific about the windows in a set ...


1

It depends on whether the article (“the”) is part of the official name, and usually it is not, such as in this case of the (not “The”) Three Gorges Dam. This can be confusing since some names are almost always used with an article, which must be capitalized at the start of a sentence. The main exception is for book or movie titles, where it is so common that ...


1

Choosing the definite or indefinite article is often tricky, as it seems you have found. This is complicated further by the existence of many fixed phrases in the form of "a/the [noun] of [noun]" that break the typical rules. In your examples, Both would be correct, but there is a subtle difference in their meanings. In 1a, "a resumption"...


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