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23 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

Grammarly is right because the sentence is grammatically correct. Your teacher has a point because there are several issues with the usage of like in this sentence. According to the Cambridge ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
22 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

In the strictest sense, it is indeed grammatically correct. However, it’s not well written, and this is often misinterpreted as being equivalent to saying it’s grammatically incorrect. Consider for ...
Austin Hemmelgarn's user avatar
6 votes

"played the violin as/like my brother did"

We usually surround nonrestrictive / parenthetical phrases with paired commas. However, whether a phrase meets that condition is often quite debatable. When a phrase follows a verb that it modifies, ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
5 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

It's not quite correct. It's missing one word, at a minimum: "Like when Pearl..." or "Like the time when Pearl..." Alternatively, you could recast the sentence and make it slightly ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
5 votes

Grammarly says that starting "Like Pearl was hesitant to..." with "Like" is fine, but my parent says it is grammatically incorrect

Your paragraph is grammatically correct. Your teacher was wise to ask you to re-write it. As written, the paragraph is difficult to understand. The first question is very long. I needed to read it ...
Jasper's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is it right using of the word 'like' in the movie Pulp fiction?

It's a general idiomatic expression, "to (verb) like (something)." Some examples from popular music: Drop it like it's hot We're going to party like it's 1999 So we put our hands up like ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
2 votes
Accepted

When can I use 'as' instead of 'like'?

I doubt you'll get "all the rules", but I'll give you at least one pointer concerning your first example. Both "He will fly as a dog" and "He will fly like a dog" are acceptable (albeit weird, but ...
tkp's user avatar
  • 7,402
2 votes
Accepted

Comparison "as" or "like"

Both as and like can be used as a preposition or a conjunction. In this sentence, we need a preposition because it is followed by the noun bacon. As or like - . The prepositions as and like have ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
2 votes

such an expensive car

I say both of them are a bit not grammatical. Since such an is virtually meaning (in this case): to so high a degree; so great (often used to emphasize a quality). Whereas you're saying: I'd never ...
U13-Forward's user avatar
  • 2,107
2 votes
Accepted

Is it "same as me" or "same like me"?

The grammatically correct version would be "Your team is working on the same research areas as I am [working on]. However, many people would say "...the same as me" in casual speech. "The same like ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Is "as/like I do" formal of "like me"?

Your first two examples are identical in both syntax and meaning. However, some people deprecate the use of "like" as a subordinating conjunction. One popular guide says: Like is correctly ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
1 vote

'like' or 'as' is ambiguous to me

In your question, the word "like" is being used similarly to "such as" or "for example." While "such as" can be a better choice when you want to include a list of examples rather than compare them, "...
afry's user avatar
  • 36
1 vote

They worked as (if) crazy

They worked like crazy. Check out definition 13. It says like means as if. They worked as if crazy. which, in turn, a shorten version of They worked as if they were crazy. They worked as crazy ...
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Grammar: as vs like

"I have been working as a Spanish teacher" "I have been working like a Spanish teacher" @RamPillai is right in his comments. In your further comments on a person who does Spanish ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

As and like, which one is more natural for this sentence?

Definitely 'as'. 'Like" is incorrect. EDIT: I will try to explain the reason. I am not a grammarian, if anyone who's actually made a study of this sort of thing would chime in, I'd be interested ...
rcook's user avatar
  • 2,596

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