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41

"As follows" would be the more appropriate usage. An alternative would be "The reasons for these decisions are:" or "The operator is defined by:".


27

Both answers given are completely wrong. The subject is not "all the tiptop young fellas", but "you". "As" is a dialect version of the relative pronoun "who", or "that". The meaning is To you? Who knows all the tiptop young fellas? Formally, the verb should still be "know", to agree with "you", and I think in formal speech of the time, anybody would ...


27

The phrase the America there refers to its people, not to the land mass. It is a synonym for the citizenry (of America).


18

In case anyone like myself a few minutes ago wonders why we use "as follows" and not "as follow", here is an interesting explanation: The construction is always singular: “My position is as follows” … “The three points are as follows” … “Her favorite books were as follows,” and so on. The Oxford English Dictionary describes the phrase “as ...


17

Usually, the first "as" is needed. In both examples, omitting it makes things ambiguous; it's not clear whether you mean "You're tall, as your father [is]" (where the comma is important), or "You're [as] tall as your father", and so forth. It's not strictly ungrammatical, but there's no good reason to leave that word out.


14

It means that the Democratic candidates show the same characteristics as the country they want to represent: the U.S.A. That is, the U.S.A is a patriotic, big-hearted and diverse country in the same way as the Democratic candidates are.


8

You want to use the form The reasons for these decisions are as follows: This operator is defined as follows: The other two sentences are incorrect.


8

In this kind of sentence, "as not" means "The verb takes place or doesn't take place about equally as often." They kill as many people as (they do) not (kill). A similar if not exactly the same omission might be this: — "Don't worry, Anne, you don't have to visit Mrs. Lynne if you don't want to." — "Oh, I'd just as soon see her as not!" That is, ...


7

Using as isn't strictly ungrammatical, but it's not standard usage in this sort of sentence; just use named ABC. You should use the commas. In this sentence, named ABC is what's called non-restrictive: It doesn't serve to limit the identification of method, whose identity is already clear. Non-restrictive phrases, like this one, are set off in commas; you ...


7

You're tall, like your father. Both of you are tall (your height is above-average). You're as tall as your father. You and he are the same height (and you could be of average height, or shorter than average, or taller than average — the sentence does not indicate which).


6

The structure "so consumed with wonder...as to have thrown them" is analogous to "so happy that I could...". so X as to do Y so X that it does Y So ... as is complemented with a clause whose verb is an infinitive. So ... that is complemented with a clause whose verb is tensed. He was so enamored of her that he threw his fancy shirts in a pile at ...


5

I'm going to disagree with your teacher. While we do commonly express disinterest or disdain for something by saying as for that*, the phrase does not inherently carry those sentiments. Similarly, one could put sarcastic emphasis on as to that to express the feeling that your teacher says comes with as for that. As with so much in English, context, stress ...


5

1) Were you bullied as a kid? 2) Were you bullied in your childhood? Yes, they mean the same thing. No, there is nothing wrong with the first sentence. The as a kid part describes the age of the person who was (supposedly) bullied. I forgot how to exactly name this construction. An adjunct of time, probably? Here's an example: I travelled a lot as a ...


5

Although "being" is not ungrammatical, it is not an improvement over "as" there. Some other corrections: We "find pleasure in" rather than "find a pleasure in..." helping the community person who works And in the final sentence of your example, you need adverbs, not nouns: do everything productively and efficiently


5

It's much more likely the piece of dialogue is as follows: ... if you think I am really so naive as to be fooled by another one of your tricks! Meaning: ... If you think I am so naive that I would be fooled by another one of your tricks! In fact, I just listened to it and my take is correct.


4

I think you are mistakenly generalizing on a single instance. As far as I am concerned may be used in contexts where it has approximately the same effect as saying in my opinion; but it does not mean in my opinion. Examine the actual construction of the expression as far as X is concerned: as far as means to the extent or degree that X is concerned ...


4

The girl's clothes are more expensive than the boys. The main problem I have with this sentence is the apostrophe mismatch. The apostrophe indicates possessive (in this case, a plural possessive), so you should write: The girls' clothes are more expensive than the boys'. However, if your sister said these to you aloud, there's no way to tell where she ...


4

It can also be used to indicate that both options are negative, for example: Would you like to go to a party? I'd just as soon be eaten by wolves! In this case, the respondent is using a situation which is clearly unpleasant (being eaten by wolves) to indicate that they don't want to go to a party. It should usually be easy to tell this is the intended ...


4

Two generations ago, when I was a high school student, the formal rule was as you have stated it: as ... as with affirmative comparatives, not so ... as with negative comparatives. But the distinction was never much observed in speech, and the tendency today is to use as ... as in both affirmative and negative contexts. In any case, as Damkerng T. observes, ...


4

In the case of "As explained here", "explained" is used in role of adjective. It is a common, correct construct. It's the same construct as "As a young scout, you are entitled to a discount ticket". The other construct makes it into a complex sentence: Since you are a young scout, you are entitled to a discount ticket." Both constructs are correct, ...


4

You can definitely add words in between as much and as. In your simplified examples where nothing goes between them, it's because the words are implied: I'll eat as much (food) as (it is) possible (to eat). I'll clean up as much (of the mess) as I can. There are two problems with your sun screen examples: 1) the phrasing inside the brackets is awkward and ...


4

The phrase "as compared to..." is correct. "As compare to..." would not be accepted as correct by any English speaker.


4

In this particular context there is no significant difference, but in other contexts there may be. X such as A,B,C... has two significantly different uses. The list A, B, C may be either restrictive: a qualification of X which may not omitted, as if to say only or specifically those X which are like A, B, C I prefer playwrights such as Ibsen, Shaw and ...


4

Noun phrases don't always denote an entity. Nominalisations are great examples of this, but there are plenty of verbs that denote an activity, and can be used as nouns: war battle stare In any case, it's possible that your rendering of the phrases is incorrect: America as we know it America with respect to our knowledge of it America as it relates ...


4

A good question, Dmitry! I've looked around the interwebs and found this definition: Around: (chiefly US) — used to indicate a measurement that is made along the outer surface of something circular. “How big around is the tree?” “It's five feet around.” [=(chiefly Brit) round] [=the circumference of the tree is five feet] So, by saying It was as big ...


4

Meaning from Merriam-Webster - As for - (meaning) with regard to/concerning. Example - He's here. As for the others, they'll arrive later. [=the others will arrive later] He was a nice enough person, but as for his suggestions, I found them unhelpful. As to - (1. meaning) about. Example - I'm at a loss as to how to ...


4

To make this comparison, you need the first "as". I think You're tall as your father would mean "You are tall, like your father is" which is slightly different from the sentence you want to translate.


4

the vampire life-blood cash draining net worth sweep I suggest you should parse it thus: the 'core' of the entire phrase is the NP net worth sweep ... this phrase occurs in the title of the article, and repeatedly in the body, and signifies The U.S. government’s 2012 decision to take all the profits from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac —Bloomberg This ...


4

This use of an is a mannerism, a stylistic tool, a flourish of the language, used here to strengthen the satirical meaning of the simile - after all, it's not to be taken literally (learning being a very rational occupation). Normally, this would be an occupation as irrational as learning. The article in the original is an archaic form that mostly fell out ...


4

After a little research I have to admit I wasn't right the first time. This is indeed a dialect version of "who/that". Woman: Your body was beautiful. I wanted you. Man: My body, beautiful? To you? As knows all the tiptop young fellas? The man is actually saying this: You think my body is beautiful? To you, who knows all the tiptop young fellas? ...


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