25 votes
Accepted

Why is the <th> in "posthumous" pronounced as <ch> (/tʃ/)?

TL;DR The reason why the ⟨th⟩ in posthumous is pronounced /t͡ʃ/ (ch) is the coalescence/assimilation1 of the t and the following u. Explanation 'Posthumous' is made up of the prefix post- and humous. ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
12 votes

Why is the <th> in "posthumous" pronounced as <ch> (/tʃ/)?

'Post' is a common prefix in English, from the Latin for 'last' which to us essentially means 'after'. The English 'posthumous' literally means after burial. For the full etymology of the word from ...
user avatar
  • 75k
7 votes
Accepted

Why is "don't you" pronounced "dontcha"?

𝑇𝐿;𝐷𝑅 In General American English, don't is pronounced /doʊnt/ while in Southern Standard British English, it's pronounced /dəʊnt/. In don't you, the /t/ of don't and /j/ of you coalesce to /tʃ/. ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
5 votes

Why is "don't you" pronounced "dontcha"?

You are hearing the merging of the /t/ with the /j/ (or "y") of you. If spoken as separate words you would hear. don't. you. = /dəʊnt/ /ju:/ But normally these are run together and blend to form ...
user avatar
  • 153k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the correct pronunciation of "don't you"?

First and foremost, there's no 'correct' or 'incorrect' pronunciation. Pronunciation of a particular word varies from speaker to speaker or accent to accent. All the pronunciations you've given are ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
4 votes

How to pronounce education?

/ɛdʒuˈkɛɪʃən/ is the way it's pronounced in General American (the standard American accent), and /edjuˈkɛɪʃən/ is the way it's pronounced in Recieved Pronunciation (the standard British accent). I'm ...
user avatar
  • 206
3 votes

Strange pronunciation of 'assume'

As described in this ELU answer, the pronunciation of assume in most British and Australian accents is /əˈsjuːm/ with the /s/ followed by a yod ('y' as in you). There's a tendency to merge an /s/ with ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
2 votes
Accepted

"What you", "that you", "without you" pronunciations using a "ch" between the words

Short version: In fast speech, T plus Y tends to merge to TSH, spelled CH, because of where they are pronounced in the mouth. Long version: As Adam hinted, this is really a linguistics question. ...
user avatar
  • 7,789

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible