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69 votes

Is "she don't" sometimes considered correct form?

You should understand that, in school, you will be taught a certain kind of "formal" (or "standard") English, much the same as what native English speakers are taught. This is not necessarily the ...
Andrew's user avatar
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38 votes

Is "she don't" sometimes considered correct form?

3d-person singular don't is quite common and unremarkable in speech communities where formal correctness is not held in particular esteem. It should not disturb you. But it's not acceptable in ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
35 votes

Is "she don't" sometimes considered correct form?

Your question is clear and concise, and warrants a clear and concise answer, without equivocation: Is “she don't” sometimes considered correct form? The answer to that question is: No. The ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
34 votes

Who is/are they?

Short Answer: Because Person B is referring back to Person A's sentence. Long Answer: A: I assume you know about the latest goings-on with Hessington oil. B: I wouldn't be much of a partner if I ...
Teacher KSHuang's user avatar
28 votes

Why do we have to use 'have got' instead of 'got'?

In the first sentence, "got" is redundant. You can just say "I don't know how much money he has." This refers to the amount of money he already possesses. The second sentence, "I don't know how much ...
Roger's user avatar
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26 votes

Should it be "IS" or "ARE"? --- "The only thing we haven't seen ARE locusts."

Here is what real English speakers actually do. The examples (1)-(30) below show that in such cases native speakers, including some expert users of the language, often use plural are to agree with the ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
25 votes
Accepted

"None of the kids were hungry" Or "None of the kids was hungry"

Both sentences are grammatical. When you use the phrase "none of" in front of a plural noun or pronoun, you can use either a singular or plural form of a verb. However, the plural form is common ...
Khan's user avatar
  • 27.2k
24 votes
Accepted

Who is/are they?

Use-mention distinction This is an example of the use-mention distinction. In the sentence "Who is they [sic].", "they" isn't being used as a pronoun, but instead is being used a word. That is, it's ...
R.M.'s user avatar
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22 votes
Accepted

Should it be "IS" or "ARE"? --- "The only thing we haven't seen ARE locusts."

Locusts might be plural, but 'thing' is the subject, and that is singular, so you should use is: The only thing we haven't seen is locusts. There must be subject-verb agreement. The subject is ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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20 votes

What's the difference between "Was this supposed to be...” and “Wasn't this supposed to be…"?

Let's look at a simpler example. Someone you haven't spoken to for a while phones you up, and you say "Great to hear from you!"... 1: ..."Was it a month ago when we last spoke?" 2:...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
18 votes
Accepted

Why is "I'll be", wrong as a short answer?

Heh, I think you answered your own question in your own question. It's wrong precisely because it's a response with an auxiliary verb, and therefore, we do not repeat the other verb in the short ...
Teacher KSHuang's user avatar
17 votes
Accepted

Which is the correct phrasing: Do any or Does any?

The subject in both sentences is "philosophy," which is singular. The verb in both sentences is in the present tense. Singular, third person verbs in the present tense (except for modals) terminate ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
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16 votes
Accepted

"May (might,can) could have" and "Must should have/should must have" impossible?

English auxiliary verbs combine into more complex constructions according to wholly inflexible rules: the sequence is always the modal component first (if it is present), with the following verb in ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
14 votes

Is "she don't" sometimes considered correct form?

What the other respondents fail to mention is that there is a whole dialect in American English (i.e., black inner-city English), that uses "don't" in the third person singular as a matter of course. ...
Robusto's user avatar
  • 14.4k
14 votes

Should it be "IS" or "ARE"? --- "The only thing we haven't seen ARE locusts."

Very often in speech–less rarely in print–native speakers will instinctively prefer the plural form of the verb when it follows a plural pronoun (we, they, you) and the adjacent countable noun or noun ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
12 votes
Accepted

Can the auxiliary verbs be optional sometimes?

His son was smart and his daughter ___ intelligent. This website has been shut down and its name ___ turned over by court order. This is called ‘gapped coordination’ (or just ‘gapping’). The ...
BillJ's user avatar
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11 votes

Can the auxiliary verbs be optional sometimes?

These sentences are examples of ellipsis, where text that is duplicated in two clauses is omitted from the second clause. They are both perfectly correct. The particular type in these example is ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
11 votes

She is at next door

In general when describing a person's location we say they "are in" or "are at" some place. "She is at Aunt Sally's house." "He is in the store." "He is at work." Etc. If we are using a preposition ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.6k
10 votes

Do I use 'was' or 'did' as an auxiliary in an interrogative clause?

Because you're using "taste", you need to use "did". Did the cheese taste delicious? However, if you omit "taste", you would use "was". I would argue that this form is much more common because, in ...
Catija's user avatar
  • 25.4k
10 votes

Help explaining "Where am I?" vs "...where I am"

The subject and auxiliary verb are normally switched order in a question. This process is called a subject-auxiliary inversion. That's why the auxliary verb precedes the subject in your first example. ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Do you ever put stress on the auxiliary verb in AUX + NOT?

One context in which it is common to speak the auxiliary is in imperative sentences. This makes the instruction sound more serious and more important Do not hurt your brother. This could be spoken ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
9 votes
Accepted

.... I was being! / what does it mean?

When BE is cast in the progressive construction (BE + present participle), it describes the subject's current behavior, as opposed to his more or less permanent nature or character: I was being ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
9 votes

Use of "have to" vs "am to"

"Be to", oddly enough, means that you have been directed or destined to do something by someone else. I can't. My mother says I am to clean my room. I am to go to London in a fortnight and ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
9 votes

may(=possibility) vs. can(=possibility)

We may see you tomorrow. = It is possible that we will see you tomorrow. Epistemic Modality and Other Modalities An epistemic modal is an epistemic use of a modal term, such as “might”, “necessarily”,...
Lambie's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

'Wouldn't wake up' vs. 'didn't wake up'

Wouldn't, in such sentences, means roughly "couldn't be caused to"; that is, "X wouldn't Y" means roughly "[someone] couldn't get X to Y". For example: Cathy tried to tell her husband and son to ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 4,619
8 votes

Repeating HAVE (or other auxiliary verb) in one sentence

No, you don't need to repeat it. The perfective auxiliary throws us into the near past (have/has) or distant past (had), and the rest of the sentence is clearly locked in that time by context. By ...
njwh's user avatar
  • 196
8 votes

"None of the kids were hungry" Or "None of the kids was hungry"

The key here is that there is actually a plural and singular sense of none. Rule: The word none is versatile. It has a plural sense (“not any”) as well as a singular sense (“not a single one”). ...
Rich's user avatar
  • 1,010
8 votes

Which is the best place to use "are"?

When we make a question with question words like "what","where","why","when" and other ones, provided they are not the questions to the subject of the sentence, we put the copula before the subject. ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,105
8 votes

Why do we have to use 'have got' instead of 'got'?

The past tense of “get” is “got”, just as in British English, but you should remember that: In American English, the past participle of “get” in its literal sense of “receive” or “become” is ...
WRX's user avatar
  • 4,675
7 votes

Is "she don't" sometimes considered correct form?

"She don't" would be vernacular and I think any English speaker understands it fine and many English speakers prefer to speak that way. However, it is not business English, and if you are a language ...
djechlin's user avatar
  • 525

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