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After any part of do (do, does, did, done, don't, doesn't, didn't) the verb it governs is always in the base form. Edit: I recognise "V1" from questions here as terminology which is used in TESOL, but it is unknown to most English speakers who are not TESOL teachers, and I didn't know what it meant without looking it up: it appears to mean the base form, ...


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There are such grammar constructions that depend on the time frame, implied or expressed explicitly, of a whole sentence in the English grammar. One of them is 'would have past participle' grammar construction. Generally speaking, two first sentence of the examples are built in the real past time frame. The past indefinite tense is a grammar tense that ...


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Auxiliaries are important in spoken conversation because the patterns with them are regularly used in it. They are used instead of repetition of lexical verbs in short answers. The syntax with a modal verb 'must' is governed with the so called the auxiliary pattern. The complexity of using auxiliary pattern of the modal verb 'must' is that some short answers ...


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If you mean 'microwave' as the wave in the radiation spectre, I'd recommend you such phrase as 'microwave radiation.' A listener could disambiguate the meaning of the whole sentence after such slight change. This change makes it necessary to transform the sentence into a kind as follows: Microwave radiation produces rapid and homogeneous heating in the oven ...


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In American English, when we referring to the team, we treat it as a plural if the name we're referring to it by is in plural form, and as singular if the name we're using is in singular form. We also always use the word "the" as part of a team's name. So, we would say The Lakers are the best team this year. or Los Angeles is the best team this year. ...


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