20 votes
Accepted

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

"A myth come true" is a noun phrase, not a complete sentence. You are correct in that if it were a complete sentence, the verb would have to be correctly conjugated for the subject. In this ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
15 votes
Accepted

In the sentence "I have never seen it snow", what tense is the verb "snow"?

"Snow" is a bare infinitive here. "Seen" carries the actual tense, and "snow" remains a bare infinitive no matter what the tense is. So: I saw it snow. I will see it snow. I'm seeing it snow. I see ...
Nathan Tuggy's user avatar
  • 9,513
7 votes
Accepted

"help robot population (to) adapt" -- can I omit "to"?

When using the verb "help," you can use either a to-infinitive or a bare infinitive without affecting the meaning or the grammaticality of the sentence. The bare infinitive version is more common ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

"all they did was (to) leave"

If an infinitive is preceded by an auxiliary verb and a phrase ending in do (such as What I did was, All we do is, etc.), the to is optional. From Practical English Usage, 91.5: Expressions like ...
athlonusm's user avatar
  • 1,954
7 votes
Accepted

Why can "to" be or not be omitted in the following?

Good question! When help has an object immediately followed by a complement clause, the to is optional: Please help me (to) unpack these boxes. In the second sentence of your question, the to-...
nschneid's user avatar
  • 4,587
5 votes
Accepted

Using bare infinitive after 'does'

Your friend's correction was accurate. A native speaker would say All he does is watch TV. Your proposed reversal of complement and subject is also correct: it would indeed be expressed as ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Let to do/ let do/ to let to do/ to let do

In the same way as get somebody to do something requires "to", let somebody do something requires the bare infinitive without "to". The "rule" is what I have said just above: it is an ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 74.7k
5 votes
Accepted

I can see a bear go over the river

As Glorfindel noted, this is due to see, not because of can. This is a common construction in English. Other verbs that have the same effect include observe, watch, hear, feel. There's a good ...
D. Nelson's user avatar
  • 1,588
5 votes
Accepted

A strange usage of a bare infinitive

It is the subjunctive. The subjunctive isn't used much now. English tends to use words like "if" or "I hope that" to express subjunctive concepts. In the past, however, the subjunctive was used ...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
4 votes
Accepted

Using bare infinitive with verbs such as "see", "watch", etc.: Present tense or Past Tense?

The difference between bare infinitive and gerund (-ing) is one of aspect, not tense. The bare infinitive looks at an action as a signal point in time whereas the gerund looks at it as a process (...
eques's user avatar
  • 4,485
4 votes

Why is "be" used without a "to"

This is technically called "subjunctive." It's used in a subordinate clause with a bare infinitival verb to suggest that an idea or recommendation is necessary. There are a few words that are ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
4 votes

"help robot population (to) adapt" -- can I omit "to"?

As Cambridge dictionary says: We use help with an object and an infinitive with or without to: Jack is helping me to tidy my CDs. or Jack is helping me tidy my CDs. Both “help someone do ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's the grammar behind "[Noun/pronoun] + [be] + [gerund]"

This is a feature mostly (but not exclusively!) of English as spoken by Black Americans, called African American Vernacular English (AAVE). This use of be is called the invariant be or habitual be. ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
3 votes

Is this "helped + make" combination a form of subjunctive?

Verbs can have infinitive phrases as their objects. For example "I decided to go home" or "I learned to play piano". Other verbs use a bare infinitive (without to) particularly the modal verbs: "I can ...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
3 votes

What do you mean by "ordinary preposition"?

Generally speaking, to can be either a preposition or an infinitive marker. Now if you want to learn how they are used in sentences you should learn the words more deeply. In fact, you should learn ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,025
3 votes
Accepted

Three verbs in a row, how?

Both of those sentences are grammatical in American English. (It could also be altered to create a natural sounding sentence with four consecutive verbs: We will go help repair his car.) "Go" here is ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 15.6k
3 votes

Be + past simple verb

It isn't "be + past simple". It is "be + past participle" and forms the passive voice. In this case, it is also a subjunctive. The verb "request" licences a subjunctive ...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
3 votes

Be + past simple verb

It is a subjunctive mood. The base form of a verb is used in the subjunctive mood. 'Be' is appropriate here. Active: She requests that they study his brain. She requested that they should study his ...
Mohammad Farukh Ahmad's user avatar
3 votes

Get to followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

You are using two different meanings of get to, which are used different ways. One meaning is "have the opportunity to": this takes the infinitive. The other is something like "started ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
3 votes
Accepted

have someone come or coming?

The -ing form in your example sentence is a present participle, indicating something which is currently ongoing. So, they have orders which currently are coming from all over the world. The come form ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 2,717
2 votes
Accepted

How can I know whether or not I should use the bare infinitive after a verb?

When you use a verb as a noun most of the time it needs the word to in front of it or -ing tacked on the end of it. I prefer to watch movies I prefer watching movies Certain verbs used in ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.8k
2 votes

Why the 'to be' verb is used in these sentences?

You've got to be kidding me is more the hypothetical question of whether or not you're kidding me, "got to be" is an emphasizer, whereas You are kidding me. is a certain statement whereas the ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Why is 'bare-verb go' in this sentence?

"Have" and "make" can function as causative verbs in the pattern "have (something) + verb". Other verbs don't have this pattern, and either take a to-infinitive (eg. "get (something) to do (...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
2 votes

"makes everyone feel" or "make everyone feels"

It would be feel. This pattern with make will always be complemented by the bare infinitive. Make it go Make it seem Make them feel Make the engine stall
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
2 votes
Accepted

Gerund, infinitive or root form

The second clause of your sentence contains the verb is, so it requires a noun clause as a subject. A simpler example would be riding is fun There are two choices of noun form for a verb- a gerund ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
2 votes

Nothing but to be or nothing but be?

The "but" is a red herring; it is distracting you from the actual grammar pattern Consider these example We want be free. We want to be free. I hope you agree that "want" requires a "to-...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
2 votes

"help someone do" vs. "help someone to do"

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/help-somebody-to-do Both are correct. People use 'Help one do something' and also 'Help one to do something'.
Ram Pillai's user avatar
2 votes

How "Is + verb" possible?

The first thing I do in the morning is check my mobile phone This is perfectly grammatical and perhaps the most common. When the subject has a form of "do", the infinitive is used. You can put "to" ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
2 votes

In the sentence "I watched the balloon rise", "rise" is in what verb tense? And why?

I watched the balloon rise. "Watch" is one of a few verbs of sensory perception that can take a bare infinitival complement, but not a to-infinitival complement. Most of the other verbs of ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 16.5k

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