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Here you must include the “to” in order for the sentence to be grammatically correct. As a general rule, whenever a verb is directly following another verb, it will be in the infinitive form. The first verb in your sentence is “is.” More examples: I want to go to the parade. She runs to stay in shape. However, there are some situations where a “bare ...


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You teach someone to do something. He is teaching you to speak English. to here refers to a purpose, a reason. If you teach something, you can say: I teach English. I teach sailing. [the activity of sailing a boat] I am teaching them to speak English. However, we would not say: I am teaching speaking unless it refers to public speaking, the activity. I ...


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For what I assume is the intended sense, OP's example #1 is the most natural alternative: 1) I teach you [how] to speak English But the second version doesn't have that meaning: 2) I teach you speaking English. In principle that could make sense if we interpret it as meaning I speak in English while teaching you [something, not necessarily how you ...


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