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20 votes

What is a building with two floors called?

In both American and British English, a two-story (or two-storey) house has two floors. The difference lies in the naming convention of the floors themselves, not in the total count of the floors. ...
talha2k's user avatar
  • 399
12 votes

What is a building with two floors called?

No, it is not the same. The ground floor is counted as a storey in British English, so a two-storey house has a ground floor and a first floor.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.1k
8 votes

What is a building with two floors called?

In 99.9% of cases there is no special term used. That's because having two floors is the default for "houses" in the UK. Houses with a single floor are fairly common but special enough to ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
6 votes

Is “loo roll” a common term for a roll of bath tissue?

In BrE, "loo" is a familiar term for "toilet" (both to refer to the fixture with pan and cistern, and to refer to the room containing it). Toilet paper is sold in rolls, called &...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 586
4 votes

What is a building with two floors called?

Matlab counts arrays from one while Python counts from zero, but the length of any given array doesn't change. Citizens of the USA and citizens of the UK act the same with respect to counting stories ...
gboffi's user avatar
  • 259
3 votes

What is a building with two floors called?

how many floors does it have While the most common ways of naming the floors may differ among various varieties of English, the overwhelming majority of people have no difficulty agreeing on how to ...
Glen_b's user avatar
  • 544
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a British English equivalent of a "straight-A student"?

Until a few years ago, most UK school exams were rated A, B, C etc and the term "straight A student" was common. Although the secondary school GCSE exam has moved to a numerical grading ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
3 votes

correct usage of "that"

That's a fairly natural way for someone to speak without preparation, but in writing it isn't great. I'd expect an editor or standardized test examiner to mark it wrong. The structure here is an ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Is “loo roll” a common term for a roll of bath tissue?

Loo roll's frequency appears to be in the general ballpark of other alternatives according to Google ngrams, common enough to beat out roll of toilet tissue!
DW256's user avatar
  • 673
1 vote

Is there a British English equivalent of a "straight-A student"?

In BrE, one sees: a student with top marks can be an BrE cultural equivalent of a straight A student. It can be googled and there are just too many sites to choose from. BBC UK Top marks for students ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.2k
1 vote

Is there a British English equivalent of a "straight-A student"?

Does this help? A quick Google search for "meaning straight-A-student" throws up nothing significant as an alternative even in online dictionaries such as Cambridge and Merriam Webster. ...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
1 vote

correct usage of "that"

Is this sentence using that correctly? Is it correct? Yes, that usage is correct. That here means roughly "the fact that" or "the reality that". Can a conjunction be dropped in ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 4,619

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