35

Excuse me for a moment please This leaves both purpose and destination unstated, but by making it clear that the absence will be very temporary, does not cause anyone to think that it is a total departure. This will usually be understood sufficiently in context. There are of course, many euphemisms, some gender specific, some not, some considered more ...


30

The right way to say this in the UK would be "I need to go to the toilet" or just "I need the toilet". Contrary to puppetsock, the word "WC" is hardly used these days, and younger people especially would not know what it meant. You might use it to excuse yourself from an audience with the Queen, but for everyone else you should say "toilet". "Bathroom" ...


18

(Excuse me,) I need to use the toilet/bathroom/restroom. Exactly how that room is named depends on the continent. The commenters are right, toilet is most often used in British English, while Americans prefer restroom or bathroom. The phrase is not limited to urination: (Euphemism) to urinate or defecate. May I be excused to use the bathroom? I have to ...


14

I am very surprised that none of the answers or comments so far have mentioned the word "loo", as in "I need the loo"or "Where is the loo?". It is at least as polite as toilet. In addition, there is a certain snobbery about that word, with many users of BrE considering (quite incorrectly, on linguistic grounds) that "toilet" is a mealy-mouthed, lower-class ...


14

You won't find "Tumbleweed coifs" in a dictionary because it is a creative combination invented by Michael Weiss who wrote the article you refer to. According to Merriam-Webster, "coif" is short for "coiffure" which comes from French and means "hairstyle". Since pictures are worth a thousand words apiece, this is a picture (from Wikipedia) of a ...


13

There is no polite way to bring the image into others' minds of your spraying out waste water from your privy parts. The polite way to excuse yourself is to say some variation on I need to go. or I'll be back in a minute. If it's a need at that exact moment, then it's pretty obvious in almost all situations what that need is and you don't need to spell ...


11

As Lambie says, drinks are either carbonated or non-carbonated. I believe these are universal terms used in government or official communication. In the US: Carbonated soft drinks are collectively referred to as soda, pop, and in some parts of the country Coke (even for carbonated drinks that are not Coca-Cola). Non-carbonated drinks are referred to by ...


9

I need to... ...see a man about a dog. ...shake the dew off the lily. ...condense some fog. ...tinkle. ...pee. These are all colloquial and somewhat humorous ways people often convey this information.


8

In the US, it is acceptable to say "I need to freshen up" if it is not urgent. This gives the listener the ambiguity that the urinator is just washing their hands and applying make-up, on the listener's behalf.


8

In the US, the terms "soda," "pop," and "coke" (small "c") all refer to carbonated non-alcoholic beverages, but depending on locale, only one will actually be used with regularity. In general: "Coke" is most used in the South. Note that "the South" does not extend west of Texas, despite the name. I have been advised by Southerners that, if you ask for "a ...


7

There is nothing very formal about "a bicycle pump". That is just the normal way to say it. It is completely normal in conversation. You could say "a bike pump", or just "a pump" when the context implies "bicycle" I borrowed a pump yesterday, because my bike's front tyre was flat.


6

As a Brit I don't agree with David that it is ever used as an answer. innit is a monosyllabic teenage phrase, where every extra sound is terrible. Your second example is wrong, somebody who was saying innit would never say "lovely weather", and "right you are" is very old fashioned, so I have corrected your example Boy: Hot innit? Grandad in a ...


6

In the UK we just say... "Just popping to the loo" or "Need the loo, be right back". Or "Excuse me, I just need to go to the toilet". But very rarely "Gonna point Percy at the porcelain". Some people say "Need a wee" or "Need a pee", "Just going for a pee/wee", or "Jimmy riddle" = Piddle. Don't use "Going for a piss/slash/wizz". It seems vulgar.


5

Personally I say, “Please excuse me, I need to visit the boy’s room”. Or for women: “Please excuse me, I need to visit the ladies.” Please note: The original question was about the need to urinate. I don't think you need to say why you want to go to the boy's room or the ladies.


5

The basic term is carbonated/uncarbonated water or carbonated/uncarbonated drinks. It would be the "technical" term. Not the everyday one. In the UK, they say fizzy drinks for stuff like Coke and in the US, they say soft drinks. As for water, sparkling water is used in both for carbonated water. carbonated carbonated and fizzy drinks [UK]


5

Your version If current results hold, Man City will win [the] PL title. is perfectly grammatical, although I would prefer not to eliminate the "the", except in the space-limited context of the online display in the image. In fact I think it is better than the version with "would". There is uncertainty here in a sense, because no one yet knows if the ...


5

When using the English language "always" is very rarely applicable. You will invariably find an exception to any rule. However, where the prefix de- is being used to indicate removal of something, as in your examples, the pronunciation is with a long vowel dee-. This applies in most regional variants of English. If the word simply starts with de, for ...


5

The only time you would hear "you is" for "you are" is in dialect forms of English. It is incorrect in standard English.


4

For any kind of formal or academic work, it is desirable to use only one type of spelling in a piece of writing. American students who come to study in the UK are sometimes told to learn, and use, British spelling conventions, and sometimes to choose one or the other and stick to it. Mixing the conventions will be seen as careless and will lower the student'...


4

"it's so lovely a day"? I am going to 100% disagree with Bella swan, and say it is perfectly lovely, it is a bit quaint I wouldn't use it everyday but I can quite imagine myself saying it's so lovely a day, lets go for a picnic I would be being intentionally twee, I would be imagining wicker picnic baskets, boys playing cricket, bees buzzing and a ...


4

As a British person, I would say that American people often use "lightning rod" when they are talking about a lightning conductor. This is usually mounted at the highest point of a building, and connected to the ground by an electrically conductive link of copper or other metal. UK and US building and safety professionals tend to talk about "lightning ...


4

Sherlock Holmes is scripted in Modern English. The characters don't use much dated English, except to refer to old objects. It is not like watching a play by Shakespeare, which does use Early Modern English. If I recall the movie, the actors adopt London British Accents, (some of the accents are better than others). If you enjoy the film then watch it, it ...


4

'I need to urinate' sounds odd. You cannot say 'I need to urinate'in a formal situation or in public places. We don't usually say 'I need to urinate'. If we need to use washroom, we ask 'where's the washroom?' or 'could you, please tell me where's the washroom.'And if you are eating together in a table and you need to use the washroom you can say, 'excuse ...


4

In your comment you mention that the context is: I was talking with my course mate, we were discussing the Literary Theory course and I'm quite bad at literature, the sentence was what I said In this case all you have to do is switch would and that to make: I don't like literary theory, I can't imagine what that would be like.


4

I am a native speaker originally from Britain, now living in the US. I believe the British/American distinction is irrelevant. Both sentences are perfectly valid to my ears, each means the same in the UK as in the USA, but they have the capacity to differ subtly in meaning from each other. And that difference is exactly what you say. The first could be ...


4

The book is correct: it should be vegetables (plural). When it's a count noun, and it's a general statement, then the plural form is used: ✔ I don't like cars. ✘ I don't like car. ✔ I don't like movies. ✘ I don't like movie. When it's a mass noun, then the singular form is used: ✔ I don't like bacon. ✘ I don't like bacons. ✔ I don't ...


3

The plural is simply: school subjects And so far that I know, there is no other particular way to say it in American English.


3

Apples are red or green. That is irrelevant to my answer, so I've struck (or 'stricken') a line through it.


3

Actually there is an error. It should read: "To these is added this." The form of the verb "to be" used here needs to be the singular "is," instead of "are," which is plural.


3

Yes, that's the correct meaning to choose, at least I assume so, not having looked at the same dictionary. I'm not sure their description is entirely right, but yes, as a relative pseudo-direction between places, it can mean going somewhere that's more important, central, prestigious, metropolitan, cosmopolitan, desirable, more of a destination. Something ...


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