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2 votes

correct usage of "that"

That's a fairly natural way for someone to speak without preparation, but in writing it isn't great. I'd expect an editor or standardized test examiner to mark it wrong. The structure here is an ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

correct usage of "that"

Is this sentence using that correctly? Is it correct? Yes, that usage is correct. That here means roughly "the fact that" or "the reality that". Can a conjunction be dropped in ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 4,609
1 vote

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

The body of your question is actually "What would you call the ground floor if you were in a building where it is the first floor?", in which case the answer is obvious: You'd call it the ...
No Name's user avatar
  • 183
2 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

(especially I’m interested what you would say if you were staying at a hotel or taking a lift). Especially if you're at a hotel, you use the numbers on the lift buttons. One = 1 = First floor; Two = 2 ...
david's user avatar
  • 145
4 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

It's unlikely to be a problem if you just use the system of the place you're travelling in. However, an easy way to make doubly sure is to say: I'm on floor 2 I'm on floor 5 and so on. In English ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
3 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

In the UK, where (moving up through a building) we have a ground floor, first floor, second floor, etc these are typically labelled G (or 0), 1, 2, etc. We are perfectly aware of the American system ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 918
-1 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

You could say "I live on the bottom floor", which would usually be understandable in both contexts. Unless, of course, your building has a basement ;)
vikingsteve's user avatar
1 vote

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

Ignore ordinals "first", "second", etc. and just reference floors by number: floor number 1, floor number 2... even floor number 0, which would almost always be the number assigned ...
walen's user avatar
  • 292
1 vote

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

I live on the first floor, so could you, please, press number 2 for me. You are right, as a brit I don't think I would ever say that. Yes, normally we brits number our floors with the floor at ground ...
Peter Green's user avatar
  • 1,676
10 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

Well sure. If you are visiting a country that has a different convention for naming things from what you are used to, whether floors in a building or whatever, trying to mix the two sets of ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.4k
28 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

If I (a British speaker) am in your country (which uses 1st, 2nd 3rd; not G, 1st, 2nd) Then I would adapt to your system, and say, in perfect British English "I live on the second floor". ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
8 votes

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

I live on the first floor, so could you, please, press number 2 for me. The first clause of the sentence will just serve to confuse people. You should just state the button number shown on the car ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Does British English affirm a negative question with yes?

I'm British and I could answer it either way, but it depends on how the question is asked. If it's a statement with "aren't you?" on the end looking for confirmation then I would say "...
BeginTheBeguine's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Could I use "that" if I merely have one bike?

The opposite of what you feel is true. "My bike, which has a broken seat, is in the garage" suggests that you don't have another bike. If the non-restrictive clause bothers you, rephrase as ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k

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