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"Lawyer" is a general term for people of all grades and levels whose profession is the practice of the law, who hold a qualification. "Solicitor" is a particular kind of junior lawyer found in the UK and British Commonwealth, who carries out more routine duties such as handling legal matters on behalf of clients, including wills, divorce, property sales, ...


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[In the UK] We would usually re-order the line and say, "If it hadn't been / had it not been for her (and her quick thinking) they would all have died." ['her and her quick thinking' is a bit quaint.] But, preserving your order, we might say either, "They would all have died if it hadn't been / had it not been for her and her quick thinking", or "They ...


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In Australian English, particularly Sydney street/jail slang, it definitely means something very different; if Mr White got got for his crimes, then Mr White would be bleeding to death on a prison yard somewhere. Full of puncture wounds, probably also badly bruised. And nobody saw a thing.


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Salutations in English are formulaic. That is, you cannot change your actual greeting very much from the greeting expected by the reader. This means you will use the following very often: Dear honorific surname, though you may use Dear given name surname, if it is necessary to avoid confusion or it is desirable to avoid using the honorific. A title may also ...


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In direct questions, we invert the subject and the verb or auxiliary: Where are the waiting rooms? In indirect (embedded) questions, we don't: Can you tell me where the waiting rooms are.


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When I was young, say fifty years ago, using do support with have was American: in British English we simply didn't say Do you have (unless we meant in a habitual sense): we said Have you got, or (in a more formal register) Have you. Since then, Do you have and I don't have have become more common in British English, but they haven't completely driven out ...


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The auxiliary "do" doesn't appear with the auxiliary "have". Not every "have" acts as an auxiliary.   She doesn't have brown hair. This sentence is fine. This "have" is the main verb of its clause.   *She doesn't have bleached her hair.   She hasn't bleached her hair. Here, he main verb is the particple "bleached". The "...


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It is a nasally released stop, marked in IPA with a small subscript 'n' (unicode U+207F). I doubt that any dialect has a glottal stop in that context.


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When two consonants make a distinct sound it is called a consonant digraph, but I don't think that's what you have here. There is a transition between the d and n in 'didn't', and that transition sound varies depending on dialect. The two letters are not forming a diagraph. "Didn't" is, of course, a contraction of "did not". The "n't" part of this, or any ...


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As you point out, the first example follows a similar structure to a newspaper headline. These usually omit auxiliaries, pronouns, articles, and conjunctions, to make a punchy sentence that can be quickly read and understood. However, I think it actually goes with the 2nd and 3rd examples as bullet-points lifted from a political manifesto. When bullet ...


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I would amend the first sentence to: My best friend committed suicide because he was being bullied at his high school for being "blind" shortly after this song was released. This makes it clear that he was being bullied for being "blind" in general, which I'm sure is the case, rather than being bullied for being "blind" only at his high school. The last ...


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