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2

Some seem to be "pair" others "poor" “A couldny find a perr o yours that matched This looks like "pair". Pairs are two things that match in some way. I couldn't find a pair of yours that matched. "...the perr old girl" This looks like "poor". "Poor old (something)" is a common combination of ...


4

shoe shop is the correct term in the UK, and shoe store is the correct term in the US. Both are noun-type things made up of two words- these are called compound nouns. You don't generally use hyphens in compound nouns unless it contains prefixes, suffixes, prepositions, conjunctions, determiners, etc, for example minimum-wage, rent-a-cop or oven-to-table-...


8

A shop that sells shoes is called a shoe shop in the UK.


-1

Just want to be clear, in the UK, we never say postal mail, postal service, physical mail, post mail. It's just post. You can say: Can you put this in the post/mail please Could you post/mail me a copy


3

According to the reasons I outline in this answer, the best options seem to be: Most natural British English: email or post. Most formal British English: postal mail or email. Best for germanic language natives: email or post. Best for British and trans-European English: email or postal mail. Why not "mail or email"? "Mail or email" is ...


2

I'd use the word 'Post.' You can say 'post mail' or simply 'post.' It can describe the method of delivery or the items themselves.


3

In Canada, we use the term "lettermail" Which is technically, Lettermail™, a trademark owned by Canada Post You may additionally find answers on this post at the English Language & Usage stack exchange


12

I'd use physical mail or postal service depending on if you want to emphasise the type of format or the type of courier. Both of these terms would be universally understood to be not email, both in American and in British English. Though the term post is rare in American, the traditional courier is USPS, the United States Postal Service. Though the term ...


15

If you say "mail or email" in that sentence then you're explicitly making a distinction between the two. Use "mail" thereafter for physical letters and "email" for (surprise!) emails. "Mail" as a term for posting physical letters is common to both British and American English, which is a bonus. If this is a document ...


4

All communication should be conducted in writing, via paper mail or email


45

In British English, the term used is "post" (never "postal mail"). Business customers can now reply to requisitions online, even if they sent us the application through the post. (UK government website) A Notice of Appeal and accompanying documents may be delivered to the EAT by any method, such as email, fax, post, courier, or hand-...


61

I think "postal mail" is more formal than "snail mail" and is quite clear. I would favor using it in the sort of situation you describe.


0

There is a slight difference between the two. "We'll get a CV over to you this afternoon" - promises that the item will arrive this afternoon. "I will it send to you" - only says that the item will be sent. It makes no promise as to arrival time. Depending on delivery method, it might take several days.


1

The correct ending would be "had he". He had done nothing about supper, had he?


1

It means that the CV will arrive at its destination sometime in the afternoon but that the means by which it will get there is not specified. It may be sent by courier but it may be taken there by the speaker in person or a member of his team in which case it will have been 'taken' or 'brought' rather than 'sent'. However it will still have been 'got there'.


1

No "He gets woken" does not mean "he wakes up" but rather "someone awakens him". "He gets awake" sounds wrong to a native speaker. It might possibly mean "He becomes awake" or "he wakes up" as in After the light shies on his face, he gets awake gradually. but it is still a strained and unusual ...


1

Hardy is phonetically representing the girl's rural Wessex dialect accent, which is different from the way that educated people (e.g. his readers) spoke at the time.


2

No, you cannot change the order and keep the meaning. Unlike some other languages (most notably Latin), most English nouns are not inflected. Whether a particular noun is a subject or direct object or indirect object is entirely dependent on its placement in a sentence; its form remains the same regardless. He keeps telling me a truth. ...means "he ...


4

In American English, "on sale" can have either meaning depending on the context. The context is generally whether you would already expect the item to be available to be sold at that store or not. "Bananas are on sale at the grocery store." We would expect bananas to be available to be bought at the grocery store, so here, "on ...


0

The commas in that sentence are parenthetical commas. They indicate that whatever is between them is superfluous information that is not strictly necessary—you could remove the parenthetical content and the sentence would still be grammatically correct and would still make sense logically. In this example there is nothing wrong with the grammar of the ...


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