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It would be good to give a little more context, but the meaning of the phrases is thus: The 'far end' is the end farthest from the subject, or the entrance, depending on the context. So one could say, "There is a ticket booth at the entrance, and the ambulance is stationed at the far end of the driveway. This would mean that you see the ticket booth ...


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"Relatively unspectacular" First, the prefix "un-" means the meaning of the root word is negated. The root word is defined here: American Heritage Dictionary "spectacular" Of the nature of a spectacle; impressive or sensational. So, unspectacular means not impressive or sensational, that is something that might not be noticed ...


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Matthew Murphy is from Liverpool. There is a range of accents from this city and the surrounding areas of Merseyside and the Wirral etc. These accents may be referred to as 'Liverpudlian', or colloquially as 'scouse'. People from Liverpool, or who speak with a scouse accent are sometimes referred to as 'scousers'. Other famous musicians from Liverpool ...


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When talking about money, 'p' after a coin or amount sounds the same as the letter 'p' /piː/. 50 pence coin ✔︎ (formal) or 50p coin ✔︎ (colloquial) 20 pence coin ✔︎ (formal) or 50p coin ✔︎ (colloquial) I had £1.01 (one pound one p) in my change jar. ✔︎ I had £1.01 (one 0 one) in coins. ✘ *Not said in British English


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Q. How can I make my mind accept "agree + direct object" and make "agree + direct object" feel natural? A direct object receives the action of the verb. In other words, it is directly affected by it. The verb is agree so we must have the same opinion, or accept a suggestion or idea relating to the direct object. agree the price reach a ...


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“Coordinating work” is a very vague phrase beloved by people who prefer an impression of importance over clarity of purpose. Technically, it should mean ensuring that the work of different people or organizations is consistent with reaching a shared goal; this requires monitoring actions or communicating intentions or both. In practice, it may mean almost ...


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I am a native speaker of British English and also an accent trainer. It is very common among native speakers to drop the /t/ in 'exactly' so that it sounds like egg-ZAK-li. It also happens to 'correctly', but in that case it is considered sloppy to drop the /t/ and say cur-REK-li. The reason it happens is that in a cluster of three consonants, the middle ...


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The following website points out that when we use hope for the future, we use "to" plus infinitive only when the subjects of the main and subordinate clauses are the same. Perfect English Grammar how to use hope We can use 'to + infinitive' with 'hope' for the future. When we use 'to + infinitive', the subject is the same as the subject of 'hope'. ...


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"And this matters not just because of the inhumanity and distress, but on a practical level, it tells where to allocate resources..." When she says "on a practical level", she is referring to what she goes on to say after that. You could substitute that phrase with "pragmatically" and it would mean the same thing. Look into what ...


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This is a great question! I've been searching several dictionaries and haven't found a general usage of "the" that applies here. There are however some dictionary entries for the word "the" that are similar (in my view) to this instance but, of course, not the same: From the Macmillan Dictionary: used when you are saying what type of ...


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After a clarification in comments, I see that other answers fit the intent of the question. Just for completeness, note that “He’s off with Joe” (as in the original question) can also mean that he and Joe have gone somewhere together.


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As a native speaker, one aspect I'd often understood of phrases like "a bit off" was by analogy to something like milk or cheese (or indeed other perishable items like meat) that has turned sour or otherwise started to acquire an unpleasant flavour or odour, which could also be described as "a bit off". Conversely, when it has curdled ...


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The sentences without "the" say that the help text is wrong or incorrect in some way. It might have errors. With "the" the sentences suggest that this help text is accurate but not applicable in the current situation. It's the wrong (or incorrect) text at this spot. It might work elsewhere in the game but some other text belongs here. ...


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off adjective 33. slightly abnormal 34. not up to standard; not so good or satisfactory as usual; inferior or subnormal It's between these two definitions. If I say, "He's been off with me," or, "He's been very off with me," it means that things are not the same between us, that he hasn't been treating me like he normally does, that ...


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off, adjective 7. Inappropriate; untoward I felt that his comments were a bit off. As used in your example, the meaning is not quite as above, but similar. It sounds like the person is being unfriendly, distant, and awkward, rather than inappropriate.


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I think the cited usage is contracted from He's been very offhand with me lately... offhand - Ungraciously or offensively nonchalant or cool in manner. I'd say the contracted version is slightly "slangy". Also it's probably best avoided by non-native speakers (in favour of offhand) because in certain contexts the intended meaning might not be ...


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In every British series, it sounds to me like they are saying “MOM” (at least in American English that is how it would be spelled phonetically). From what I am gleaning in these posts, it seems that we are all hearing the same sound on both sides of the Atlantic, but the BrItish spell the sound differently than we do, aka pronounce the vowels differently. ...


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Some aspects I'd like to consider: We generally use "paper" or "papers" to refer to a piece of writing containing some information. For instance, if you go to an airport, the staff may ask: "Could you give me your papers, please?". In this case, "papers" could be a passport, some work permission, or another kind of ...


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